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i want to pass the parameters as the combination of a,b,c,d values

a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
b = [5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15]
c = [1,2,3,4,6,12,18]
d = [1,2,3,4,6,12,18,24]
results = []

this is my funcion:

def calc(a,b,c,d):
 ....

i want it to run calc(1,5,1,1) and then calc(1,5,1,2) ... calc(1,5,1,24), calc(1,5,2,1) ... calc(1,5,2,24) ... calc(1,6,1,1) ... calc(1,6,18,24) ... calc(2,5,1,1) ... calc(2,5,1,24) ... until calc(9,15,18,24)

i want to pass all possible combinations of a,b,c and d as parameters to the function

i have made it by using nested loops

for i in a:
    for j in b:
        for k in c:
             for l in d:
                 results.append(calc(i,j,k,l))

but i think this is not the best solution

it takes 15 min running because the dataset i'm using is too big

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    Here's the thing, the total number of runs through all loops will be 11*9*7*8 = 5544. This is a ridiculously small number for python, and you can pass through all the loops in under 1 millisecond. The problem therefore must be in the calc function, taking too much time. If you post it here I'm sure we can recommend a number of ways to optimize it. – Robo Mop Mar 7 at 20:20
  • If you prefer one-liner: results = [calc(i,j,k,l) for i in a for j in b for k in c for l in d] – Razzle Shazl Mar 7 at 20:24
  • I recommend that you post your calc function to codereview.stackexchange.com; make sure you check their posting standards. – Prune Mar 7 at 20:24
  • thanks for your help @RoboMop this is my function: it calculates the cumulative return and take the mean. i think the problem is that the formation = 132 months. so the it iterates 132*12*8*8 = 101376 times over a dataset with 159 rows × 135 columns code def retorno(formation, tamanho, hold,tempo): .... loserret = ((mtl_ret.loc[formation + MonthEnd(1): formation + MonthEnd(hold), mtl_ret.columns.isin(losers)]+1).cumprod().mean(axis=1)[-1]) ... return loserret code – Remo Mar 7 at 20:51
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The runtime can't really be changed if you need to evaluate everything - but that would depend on your calc function and whether you have any repeats in your inputs (which would allow you to use dynamic programming and cache lookups to your function instead).

For simplifying iteration, you can use itertools.product:

Cartesian product of input iterables.

Roughly equivalent to nested for-loops in a generator expression. For example, product(A, B) returns the same as ((x,y) for x in A for y in B).

So to iterate over the product of all these lists:

import itertools

for a_i, b_i, c_i, d_i in itertools.product(a, b, c, d):
    calc(a_i, b_i, c_i, d_i)

However be aware that this might not be the exact same iteration pattern as you mentioned in your example, but it will still iterate over each possible combination from your lists.

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To tame the complexity a little bit, you can use itertools.product:

itertools.product(*iterables, repeat=1)

Cartesian product of input iterables.

Roughly equivalent to nested for-loops in a generator expression. For example, product(A, B) returns the same as (x,y) for x in A for y in B).

import itertools

p = itertools.product(a, b, c, d)

for value_a, value_b, value_c, value_d in p:
    result = calc(value_a, value_b, value_c, value_d)

    print(result)
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    Important caveat is that this won't make it any faster. The dataset being too big is a more fundamental problem whose solution depends on what calc is doing and what you're doing with the result (do you really need to save them all in a list?). – Samwise Mar 7 at 20:16
  • Yes, good point. – Julia Mar 7 at 20:18

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