686

I want to make body have 100% of the browser height. Can I do that using CSS?

I tried setting height: 100%, but it doesn't work.

I want to set a background color for a page to fill the entire browser window, but if the page has little content I get a ugly white bar at the bottom.

21 Answers 21

889

Try setting the height of the html element to 100% as well.

html, 
body {
    height: 100%;
}

Body looks to its parent (HTML) for how to scale the dynamic property, so the HTML element needs to have it's height set as well.

However the content of body will probably need to change dynamically. Setting min-height to 100% will accomplish this goal.

html {
  height: 100%;
}
body {
  min-height: 100%;
}
  • 3
    thanks, this seem to remove the white bar on short pages, but now on pages which height exceeds the browser window height I get a 20px white bar at the bottom :| – bodyofheat Jul 11 '11 at 19:01
  • 44
    ok I found out! it works if I add html,body{min-height:100%;} :D – bodyofheat Jul 11 '11 at 19:32
  • 50
    doesn't work for Chrome – bFunc Jul 19 '14 at 12:29
  • 8
    Note: if you use the body {min-height} version then you cannot use .body-child{height: 100%} trick. – Salman A Dec 6 '14 at 9:52
  • 7
    best answer is with CSS3, using vh -> body { height: 100vh } - check answer here stackoverflow.com/a/25829844/2680216 – Adriano Resende Oct 2 '15 at 17:53
171

As an alternative to setting both the html and body element's heights to 100%, you could also use viewport-percentage lengths.

5.1.2. Viewport-percentage lengths: the ‘vw’, ‘vh’, ‘vmin’, ‘vmax’ units

The viewport-percentage lengths are relative to the size of the initial containing block. When the height or width of the initial containing block is changed, they are scaled accordingly.

In this instance, you could use the value 100vh - which is the height of the viewport.

Example Here

body {
    height: 100vh;
}
body {
    min-height: 100vh;
}

This is supported in most modern browsers - support can be found here.

  • 4
    Besides the fact that this is dead simple, it's also good that we adopt new practices. – Pan Wangperawong Jun 29 '15 at 20:07
  • 3
    @niaster I definitely agree. Browser support has already improved since I posted this answer as well :) – Josh Crozier Jun 29 '15 at 20:12
  • 5
    This should now become an accepted answer. – incarnate Jul 7 '15 at 9:37
  • 10
    Not sure why we need to start "adopting new practices" when the old practice works fine. There's no advantage to doing this: the code is not smaller, nor does it perform any better, and there are still browsers out there that don't support vw/vh. – cimmanon Aug 3 '15 at 23:02
  • 2
    doesn't work on mobile... – BentOnCoding Nov 16 '15 at 16:41
115

If you have a background image then you will want to set this instead:

html{
  height: 100%;
}
body {
  min-height: 100%;
}

This ensures that your body tag is allowed to continue growing when the content is taller than the viewport and that the background image continues to repeat/scroll/whatever when you start scrolling down.

Remember if you have to support IE6 you will need to find a way to wedge in height:100% for body, IE6 treats height like min-height anyway.

  • Also works when there is a global flexbox right under body (body > #flexbox-wrapper) – justnorris Jun 14 '13 at 12:41
  • 1
    This is the correct answer, as the accepted answer will not grow as content gets longer than a single screen. – SimplGy Jun 21 '13 at 22:10
  • Thank you so much, Angry Dan, that ugly white space at the bottom of my site is gone! – Boris Burkov May 7 '14 at 15:37
  • Of course, since this question was posed, view port based dimensions became a Thing. So now you can just do body{min-height: 100vh} – Angry Dan Jul 8 '15 at 15:39
  • You also need body { height: auto; } for scrollbars to not be shown in FireFox. other than that, works perfectly. – Torxed Jan 27 '16 at 13:09
68

If you want to keep the margins on the body and don't want scroll bars, use the following css:

html { height:100%; }
body { position:absolute; top:0; bottom:0; right:0; left:0; }

Setting body {min-height:100%} will give you scroll bars.

See demo at http://jsbin.com/aCaDahEK/2/edit?html,output .

  • 5
    Thank you for the only working answer :) I assume 'absolute' made it work – Dmitry Matveev Jul 8 '14 at 10:14
  • Works well for me in Firefox without scrollbars, thank you. The accepted answer does not. – Andrew Jul 8 '15 at 8:00
  • @Andrew Oddly enough, this gives scroll-bars in FireFox. What you need however to the accepted answer is height: auto; in the body clause as well for scrollbars to now pop up. – Torxed Jan 27 '16 at 13:08
  • @Torxed I still get scroll bars in FireFox with this too. Adding the auto setting to height didn't seem to work for me :( – Travis Crum Feb 4 '16 at 20:25
  • This didn't work for me in Chrome 56.0.2924.87 (64-bit). – Ryan Mar 7 '17 at 20:04
26
html, body
{
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}
  • 3
    Works for updated Chrome and FF @ 09.2014 – bFunc Jul 19 '14 at 12:29
19

What I use on the start of literally every CSS file I use is the following:

html, body{
    margin: 0;

    padding: 0;

    min-width: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    max-width: 100%;

    min-height: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    max-height: 100%;
}

The margin of 0 ensures that the HTML and BODY elements aren't being auto-positioned by the browser to have some space to the left or right of them.

The padding of 0 ensures that the HTML and BODY elements aren't automatically pushing everything inside them down or right because of browser defaults.

The width and height variants are set to 100% to ensure that the browser doesn't resize them in anticipation of actually having an auto-set margin or padding, with min and max set just in case some weird, unexplainable stuff happens, though you probably dont need them.

This solution also means that, like I did when I first started on HTML and CSS several years ago, you won't have to give your first <div> a margin:-8px; to make it fit in the corner of the browser window.


Before I posted, I looked at my other fullscreen CSS project and found that all I used there was just body{margin:0;} and nothing else, which has worked fine over the 2 years I've been working on it.

Hope this detailed answer helps, and I feel your pain. In my eyes, it is dumb that browsers should set an invisible boundary on the left and sometimes top side of the body/html elements.

  • Could you explain please, what is the possible purpose of width: 100% for body and html elements? Yes, I understand, that from practical point of view, body { margin: 0; } should be enough in most cases. I just want to understand more thoroughly. – john c. j. Jan 23 '17 at 17:37
18

After testing various scenarios, I believe this is the best solution:

html {
    width:100%;
    height: 100%;
    display: table;
}

body {
    width:100%;
    display:table-cell;
}

html, body {
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
}

It is dynamic in that the html and the body element will expand automatically if their contents overflow. I tested this in the latest version of Firefox, Chrome, and IE 11.

See the full fiddle here (for you table haters out there, you can always change it to use a div):

https://jsfiddle.net/71yp4rh1/9/


With that being said, there are several issues with the answers posted here.

html, body {
    height: 100%;
}

Using the above CSS will cause the html and the body element to NOT automatically expand if their contents overflow as shown here:

https://jsfiddle.net/9vyy620m/4/

As you scroll, notice the repeating background? This is happening because the body element's height has NOT increased due to its child table overflowing. Why doesn't it expand like any other block element? I'm not sure. I think browsers handle this incorrectly.

html {
    height: 100%;
}

body {
    min-height: 100%;
}

Setting a min-height of 100% on the body as shown above causes other problems. If you do this, you cannot specify that a child div or table take up a percentage height as shown here:

https://jsfiddle.net/aq74v2v7/4/

Hope this helps someone. I think browsers are handling this incorrectly. I would expect the body's height to automatically adjust growing larger if its children overflow. However, that doesn't seem to happen when you use 100% height and 100% width.

  • 2
    I tried all of the high-voted answers on this page, but none worked. This one did! – Ryan Mar 7 '17 at 20:31
13

A quick update

html, body{
    min-height:100%;
    overflow:auto;
}

A better solution with today's CSS

html, body{ 
  min-height: 100vh;
  overflow: auto;
}
  • 2
    How does this offer anything different over the existing answers? – cimmanon Aug 3 '15 at 23:05
  • 1
    I have tried others also, but did not work for me. This one worked, so it can be a solution to someone needy. @cimmanon – Jayant Varshney Aug 4 '15 at 4:47
  • This works, thank you! – Liran H Nov 6 '17 at 17:15
  • 1
    This is the only one which worked for me. Thanks! – James Nov 30 '17 at 22:11
  • I have to say this one works for me other than other high vote answers. overflow: auto here do the magic. Btw I use Chrome. – SkuraZZ Oct 15 '18 at 6:36
4

Here:

html,body{
    height:100%;
}

body{
  margin:0;
  padding:0
  background:blue;
}
3

Please check this:

* {margin: 0; padding: 0;}    
html, body { width: 100%; height: 100%;}

Or try new method Viewport height :

html, body { width: 100vw; height: 100vh;}

Viewport: If your using viewport means whatever size screen content will come full height fo the screen.

  • Please include an explanation of your solution so others who find this answer can understand. Thanks! – Shawn Oct 26 '16 at 19:37
  • 1
    Hi Sir, check after code i given explanation.... – Ayyappan K Nov 10 '16 at 21:57
  • Could you explain please, what is the possible purpose of width: 100% for body and html elements? – john c. j. Jan 23 '17 at 18:08
  • so lets say i have a table with 50 columns and 1000 rows having numbers between 1000 to 9999, what will happen to them, will they scroll beyond the window like we do normally or will they have an overflow type scrollbar – PirateApp Jul 15 '18 at 7:48
3

You can also use JS if needed

var winHeight = window.innerHeight    || 
document.documentElement.clientHeight || 
document.body.clientHeight;

var pageHeight = $('body').height();
if (pageHeight < winHeight) {
    $('.main-content,').css('min-height',winHeight)
}
  • But for this you need to add more things than needed like jQuery library and writing in JavaScript whilst this can be done in CSS. – Front-end Developer Nov 16 '17 at 23:21
2

Try

<html style="width:100%; height:100%; margin: 0; padding: 0;">
<body style="overflow:hidden; width:100%; height:100%; margin:0; padding:0;">
  • 2
    Could you explain please, what is the possible purpose of width: 100% for body and html elements? Yes, I understand, that from practical point of view, body { margin: 0; } should be enough in most cases. I just want to understand more thoroughly. – john c. j. Jan 23 '17 at 17:44
2

Only with 1 line of CSS… You can get this done.

body{ height: 100vh; }
2

If you don't want the work of editing your own CSS file and define the height rules by yourself, the most typical CSS frameworks also solve this issue with the body element filling the entirety of the page, among other issues, at ease with multiple sizes of viewports.

For example, Tacit CSS framework solves this issue out of the box, where you don't need to define any CSS rules and classes and you just include the CSS file in your HTML.

1
html {
    background: url(images/bg.jpg) no-repeat center center fixed; 
    -webkit-background-size: cover;
    -moz-background-size: cover;
    -o-background-size: cover;
    background-size: cover;
    min-height: 100%;
}
html body {
    min-height: 100%
}

Works for all major browsers: FF, Chrome, Opera, IE9+. Works with Background images and gradients. Scrollbars are available as content needs.

1

Try adding:

body {
height: 100vh;
}
0

all answers are 100% correct and well explained, but i did something good and very simple to make it responsive.

here the element will take 100% height of view port but when it comes to mobile view it don't look good specially on portrait view ( mobile ), so when view port is getting smaller the element will collapse and overlap on each other. so to make it little responsive here is code. hope someone will get help from this.

<style>
.img_wrap{
      width:100%;
      background: #777;
}
.img_wrap img{
      display: block;  
      width: 100px;
      height: 100px;
      padding: 50px 0px;
      margin: 0 auto;
}
.img_wrap img:nth-child(2){
      padding-top: 0;
}
</style>

<div class="img_wrap">
  <img src="https://i.pinimg.com/originals/71/84/fc/7184fc63db0516a00e7d86900d957925.jpg" alt="">
  <img src="https://i.pinimg.com/originals/71/84/fc/7184fc63db0516a00e7d86900d957925.jpg" alt="">
</div>

<script>
   var windowHeight = $(window).height();
   var elementHeight = $('.img_wrap').height();

   if( elementHeight > windowHeight ){
       $('.img_wrap').css({height:elementHeight});
   }else{
       $('.img_wrap').css({height:windowHeight});
   }
</script>

here is JSfiddle Demo.

0

Here Update

html
  {
    height:100%;
  }

body{
     min-height: 100%;
     position:absolute;
     margin:0;
     padding:0; 
}
-1

About the extra space at the bottom: is your page an ASP.NET application? If so, there is probably a wrapping almost everything in your markup. Don't forget to style the form as well. Adding overflow:hidden; to the form might remove the extra space at the bottom.

  • 6
    I do not recommend using overflow:hidden unless you have a really good reason. Find out why things are overflowing and adjust so it will not overflow instead – jontro Jan 19 '15 at 14:37
-1
@media all {
* {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

html, body {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
} }
  • Could you explain please, what is the possible purpose of width: 100% for body and html elements? Yes, I understand, that from practical point of view, body { margin: 0; } should be enough in most cases. I just want to understand more thoroughly. – john c. j. Jan 23 '17 at 17:45
-2

CSS3 has a new method.

 height:100vh

It makes ViewPort 100% equal to the height.

So your Code should be

 body{
 height:100vh; 
 }

protected by Josh Crozier May 12 '14 at 22:36

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