69

My first attempt of reverse for loop that does something n times was something like:

for ( unsigned int i = n-1; i >= 0; i-- ) {
    ...     
}

This fails because in unsigned arithmetic i is guaranteed to be always greater or equal than zero, hence the loop condition will always be true. Fortunately, gcc compiler warned me about a 'pointless comparison' before I had to wonder why the loop was executing infinitely.


I'm looking for an elegant way of resolving this issue keeping in mind that:

  1. It should be a backwards for loop.
  2. The loop index should be unsigned.
  3. n is unsigned constant.
  4. It should not be based on the 'obscure' ring arithmetics of unsigned integers.

Any ideas? Thanks :)

8
  • 5
    if n > largest positive value representable by int. Mar 20, 2009 at 11:38
  • 1
    Then use a long. And if your array's too big for a long, you've got more serious problems than unsigned :-)
    – paxdiablo
    Mar 20, 2009 at 11:41
  • 1
    Semantics, maybe? As i should never be below zero.
    – Auron
    Mar 20, 2009 at 11:42
  • 1
    who said anything about an array?
    – anon
    Mar 20, 2009 at 11:42
  • 1
    @Pax: for example, this could be code for a 16-bit processor, where i starts above 32767. Using anything bigger than an unsigned int would be inefficient. Mar 21, 2009 at 17:07

20 Answers 20

116

How about:

for (unsigned i = n ; i-- > 0 ; )
{
  // do stuff with i
}
13
  • 4
    @Auron, n is typically the length of an array, so in most cases you don't want i == n.
    – quinmars
    Mar 20, 2009 at 12:07
  • 10
    As far as I'm concerned this is the standard idiom for reverse loop, I'm surprised people haven't met it before.
    – bobince
    Mar 20, 2009 at 13:33
  • 6
    You can even write it as i --> 0 which will tell visually the intention ;-) May 11, 2011 at 8:22
  • 5
    @HeathHunnicutt - Unsigned integer arithmetic has well defined "modulo" semantics. Out of bounds results will silently wrap.
    – Mankarse
    Oct 16, 2011 at 9:08
  • 3
    @HeathHunnicutt unsigned integers never overflow or underflow in C. Only for signed integers underflows and overflows have undefined behavior. From the standard: unsigned arithmetic does not overflow because a result that cannot be represented by the resulting unsigned integer type is reduced modulo the number that is one greater than the largest value that can be represented by the resulting unsigned integer type..
    – Ruslan
    Mar 3, 2016 at 5:21
15
for ( unsigned int loopIndex = n; loopIndex > 0; --loopIndex ) {
    unsigned int i = loopIndex - 1;
    ...
} 

or

for ( unsigned int loopIndex = 0; loopIndex < n; ++loopIndex ) {
    unsigned int i = n - loopIndex - 1;
    ...
} 
1
  • Yikes! I accidentally deleted a comment when trying to delete my own. Got from my cache: "A classic example of long variable names making the code less readable, IMHO." -- sorry, can't find an undo
    – Lou Franco
    Mar 20, 2009 at 11:40
12

Why not simply:

unsigned int i = n;
while(i--)
{ 
    // use i
}

This meets all the requirement enumerated in the body of the question. It doesn't use anything likely to fail code review or violate a coding standard. The only objection I could see to it is if the OP really insisted on a for loop and not a straightforward way of generating i = (n-1) .. 0.

3
  • Elegant and simple solution, although a bit obscure, in my opinion. In general, I would try to avoid code with ++ or -- operators, where I have to think twice to find out what is really happening there.
    – Auron
    May 20, 2011 at 7:34
  • 4
    @Auron When I learnt C understanding the difference between ++i and i++ was not considered obscure. How times have changed. With a upvote of 19 this is considered easier for (unsigned i = n ; i-- > 0 ; )... Oh well!
    – idz
    May 20, 2011 at 9:55
  • 1
    Neither it was when I learnt C. I also think the most upvoted answer is a bit obscure too. More than two years have passed, and maybe today I wouldn't have voted it as recommended. Nevertheless, I upvoted your answer, and I'd suggest while (i-- != 0) as a clearer way to write the loop condition.
    – Auron
    May 24, 2011 at 14:09
11
for ( unsigned int i = n; i != 0; i-- ) {
    // do something with i - 1
    ...     
}

Note that if you use C++ as well as C, using != is a good habit to get into for when you switch to using iterators, where <= etc. may not be available.

1
  • 1
    plus, when any code within the loop decreases i even further, you'll notice an infinite loop soon. (and it's easier to reason about)
    – xtofl
    Mar 20, 2009 at 12:38
10

I'd tend to use

 for ( unsigned int i = n; i > 0; )  {
    --i;
    ...     
 }

it's almost the same as skizz' answer, (it misses out a final unnecessary decrement, but the compiler should optimise that away), and actually will pass code review. Every coding standard I've had to work with has had a no-mutation in conditional rule.

6
  • 2
    Now that's a mutilated for construct, to be swiftly replaced by a while statement! -1 for that.
    – xtofl
    Mar 20, 2009 at 12:39
  • xtofl -- No, not a while statement. Skizz shows the best way. A while statement needs its loop variable declared outside its scope, in an independent statement.
    – Svante
    Mar 20, 2009 at 12:55
  • Unfortunately, Skizz' answer wouldn't get past code review in most shops. Mar 20, 2009 at 13:03
  • 1
    "no-mutation in conditional" - I thought we were programmers, not (code)monkeys! Rules should be broken wherever the code would suffer because of it. Using an 'i-1' indexer is far worse than a mutating conditional. The hoops some of these answers jump through are just ugly.
    – Skizz
    Mar 20, 2009 at 14:22
  • I agree about using a i-1 indexer being worse. Mar 20, 2009 at 14:48
8
for ( unsigned int i = n; i > 0; i-- ) {
    ...  
    i-1 //wherever you've been using i   
}
3
  • 4
    I personally find that using "i-1" instead of just "i" is non-obvious without a big warning comment and is likely to cause strange bugs when someone in the future instinctively uses "i" instead of "i-1".
    – Skizz
    Mar 20, 2009 at 12:20
  • yeah, just like using 0 to accessing first cell of an array. Life ain't easy ;-)
    – vartec
    Mar 20, 2009 at 12:28
  • 1
    You can get around that by calling i 'counter' and declaring a variable called 'index = counter-1'.
    – xtofl
    Mar 20, 2009 at 12:36
5

Maybe this way? IMHO its clear and readable. You can omit the if(n>=1) if it is implicitly known somehow.

if(n>=1) {
    // Start the loop at last index
    unsigned int i = n-1;
    do {
       // a plus: you can use i, not i-1 here
    } while( i-- != 0 );
}

Another version:

if(n>=1) {
    unsigned int i = n;
    do {
       i--;

    } while( i != 0 );
}

The first code without if statement would look like:

unsigned int i = n-1;
do {

} while( i-- != 0 );
0
4
for (unsigned int i = n-1; i<(unsigned int)-1; i--)

OK, its "obscure ring arithmetic".

2
4

Or you could rely on the wrapping behaviour of unsigned int if you need indexing from n-1 to 0

for(unsigned int i = n-1; i < n; i--) {
    ...
}
3
for ( unsigned int i = n; i > 0; i-- ) {
    unsigned int x = i - 1;
    // do whatever you want with x    
}

Certainly not elegant, but it works.

3

The only reason I mention this option is because I did not see it in the list.

for ( unsigned int i = n-1; i < n; i-- ) {
... 
}

Totally against intuition, but it works. the reason it works is because subtracting 1 from 0 yields the largest number that can be represented by an unsigned integer.

In general I do not think it is a good idea to work with unsigned integers and arthmetic, especially when subtracting.

2
  • This makes me wonder if it is a good idea or not to work with unsigned arithmetic in for loops...
    – Auron
    Mar 21, 2009 at 20:04
  • 1
    Mmmm... according to the time stamp, @peje was there 3 minutes before you did... but I wonder how you two ended up with exactly the same code???!!!
    – ysap
    Mar 27, 2012 at 2:59
2

Easy, just stop at -1:

for( unsigned int i = n; i != -1; --i )
{
 /* do stuff with i */
}

edit: not sure why this is getting downvoted. it works and it's simpler and more obvious than any of the above.

2
  • 1
    It doesn't work because i is unsigned and you should not be comparing it to a signed value. My C compiler has the warnings turned up high enough not to accept code like this. If you used a cast like (unsigned)-1 it would work, but why not use the more obvious UINT_MAX macro? If I saw this in someone's code as is, I would be scratching my head trying to figure out why it wasn't an infinite loop. It works, but it's not obvious.
    – Chris Lutz
    Sep 6, 2009 at 22:54
  • 1
    I definitely like the UINT_MAX solution or even the cast. Love it! I used to use what Pete Kirkham suggests, but this is so much better!
    – the swine
    Mar 17, 2013 at 17:00
1
for ( unsigned int i = n; i > 0; i-- ) {
    ...     
}

Should work fine. If you need to use the i variable as an index into an array do it like this:

array[i-1];
1

Hm. Here are your options:

  1. Use i=0 as your break condition - Loop will not execute when i reaches 0, so execute 1 iteration of the loop contents for i=0 after the loop has exited.
for ( unsigned int i = n-1; i > 0; i-- ) {
    doStuff(i);
}
doStuff(0);
  1. In the loop, test for i=0 and break out. Not recommended because now you're testing the value of i twice in the loop. Also using break within a loop is generally regarding as bad practice.
for ( unsigned int i = n-1; i >= 0; i-- ) {
    doStuff(i);
    if (i=0) break;
}
1
  • I think repeating the doStuff just because you're working with unsigned int is a bit... overhead? Just as testing for one special case of something that's actually not special at all.
    – xtofl
    Mar 20, 2009 at 12:41
1
unsigned index;
for (unsigned i=0; i<n; i++)
{
    index = n-1 - i; // {i == 0..n-1} => {index == n-1..0}
}
0

This is untested, but could you do the following:

for (unsigned int i, j = 0; j < n; i = (n - ++j)) {
    /* do stuff with i */
}
0

Use two variables, one to count up, and the other for the array index:

unsigned int Index = MAX - 1;
unsigned int Counter;
for(Counter = 0; Counter < MAX; Counter++)
{
    // Use Index
    Index--;
}
0

Since this is not a standard for loop I would probably use a while loop instead, e.g.:

unsigned int i = n - 1;
while (1)
{
    /* do stuff  with i */

     if (i == 0)
    {
        break;
    }
    i--;
}
1
  • If n is 0 initially, this suffers from the same issue the OP asked about, as i will be a very large number on the 1st loop iteration. Jun 30 at 23:23
-1
for ( unsigned int i = n-1; (n-i) >= 0; i-- ) {
    // n-i will be negative when the loop should stop.
    ...     
}
1
  • 1
    if n and i are both unsigned, n-i will be also unsigned, won't it?
    – Auron
    Mar 20, 2009 at 11:48
-6

e.z:

#define unsigned signed

for ( unsigned int i = n-1; i >= 0; i-- ) { ... 
}
2
  • Why would I want tho change 'unsigned' by 'signed' and lose all the semantics?
    – Auron
    Sep 11, 2009 at 8:03
  • 5
    Ahaha, best troll answer I've seen.
    – alecov
    Apr 29, 2015 at 17:06

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