69

I'm running below code to clean text

import pandas as pd

def not_regex(pattern):
        return r"((?!{}).)".format(pattern)
    
tmp = pd.DataFrame(['No one has a European accent either @',
                    'That the kid   reminds me of Kevin'])

tmp[0].str.replace(not_regex('(\\b[-/]\\b|[a-zA-Z0-9])'), ' ') 

Then it returns a warning

<ipython-input-8-ef8a43f91dbd>:9: FutureWarning: The default value of regex will change from True to False in a future version.
  tmp[0].str.replace(not_regex('(\\b[-/]\\b|[a-zA-Z0-9])'), ' ')

Could you please elaborate on the reason of this warning?

2
  • 13
    In Series.str.replace the the current default value for the param regex is set to True. In a future version it will be defaulted to false: regex=False This means in the future, if you want to use regex with str,replace you will need to set the regex param to True. str.replace docs. You can also look at the depreciation list here Mar 12, 2021 at 16:48
  • 4
    You're welcome. One more thing to note: "In addition, single character regular expressions will not be treated as literal strings when regex=True is set" Mar 12, 2021 at 16:55

3 Answers 3

127

See Pandas 1.2.0 release notes:

The default value of regex for Series.str.replace() will change from True to False in a future release. In addition, single character regular expressions will not be treated as literal strings when regex=True is set (GH24804)

I.e., use regular expressions explicitly now:

dframe['colname'] = dframe['colname'].str.replace(r'\D+', regex=True)
3
  • 3
    does it means that if you don't use regex you shouldn't mind about this warning ? Mar 28, 2023 at 13:02
  • 1
    if you specify string.str.replace("nan", "", regex=False) (or whatever your use case is), you will not get the warning.
    – Evan
    Apr 15, 2023 at 4:06
  • 1
    @lcrmorin If you do not use regex, be aware the old library will treat it as a regex. ALWAYS specify if you are using or not using a regex, it is safest. Apr 22, 2023 at 13:45
4

I have like

df.Experience.head(5)
0    24 years experience
1    12 years experience
2     9 years experience
3    12 years experience
4    20 years experience
Name: Experience, dtype: object

I use like

df['Experience']=df['Experience'].str.replace(r'\D+','', regex=True).astype(int)

I get like

df.Experience.head(5)
0    24
1    12
2     9
3    12
4    20
Name: Experience, dtype: int64
1

For the warning not to appear, just put regex=True inside the parentheses

EX: str.replace('.', '',regex=True)

1

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