26

I have two questions:

  1. Is there a need to use Interlocked class for accessing boolean values? Isnt a read or a write to a boolean value atomic by default?

  2. I tried using Interlocked.CompareExchange on a boolean and got the following error:

    bool value = true;
    Interlocked.CompareExchange<bool>(ref value, false, true);
    

    Error: The type 'bool' must be a reference type in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'System.Threading.Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref T, T, T)'

How do i go about solving this problem ?

  • 4
    your question fails to mention the magic 'threading' word anywhere. What are you trying to do? – Mitch Wheat Jul 12 '11 at 7:55
25
  1. Reading or writing boolean values separately is atomic, but "compare and exchange" does both reading and writing to the same address, which means that entire transaction is not atomic. If multiple threads can write to this same location, you need to make the entire transaction atomic, by using the Interlocked class.

  2. public static T CompareExchange<T>(ref T a, T b, T c)) where T : class overload can only be used with reference types (note the where T : class clause at the end). Instead of a boolean value, you can use the CompareExchange(Int32, Int32, Int32) overload, and switch the boolean with an Int32.

    Alternatively, if you want to keep your variables of boolean type, you can use the lock method to ensure thread safety. This would be a slightly slower solution, but depending on your performance requirements, this might be still the preferred way.

11

Roll your own "AtomicBoolean" class (that wraps Interlocked.CompareExchange(...))

using System.Threading;

public class AtomicBoolean
{
    private const int TRUE_VALUE = 1;
    private const int FALSE_VALUE = 0;
    private int zeroOrOne = FALSE_VALUE;

    public AtomicBoolean()
        : this(false)
    { }

    public AtomicBoolean(bool initialValue)
    {
        this.Value = initialValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Provides (non-thread-safe) access to the backing value
    /// </summary>
    public bool Value
    {
        get
        {
            return zeroOrOne == TRUE_VALUE;
        }
        set
        {
            zeroOrOne = (value ? TRUE_VALUE : FALSE_VALUE);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Attempt changing the backing value from true to false.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Whether the value was (atomically) changed from false to true.</returns>
    public bool FalseToTrue()
    {
        return SetWhen(true, false);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Attempt changing the backing value from false to true.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Whether the value was (atomically) changed from true to false.</returns>
    public bool TrueToFalse()
    {
        return SetWhen(false, true);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Attempt changing from "whenValue" to "setToValue".
    /// Fails if this.Value is not "whenValue".
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="setToValue"></param>
    /// <param name="whenValue"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public bool SetWhen(bool setToValue, bool whenValue)
    {
        int comparand = whenValue ? TRUE_VALUE : FALSE_VALUE;
        int result = Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref zeroOrOne, (setToValue ? TRUE_VALUE : FALSE_VALUE), comparand);
        bool originalValue = result == TRUE_VALUE;
        return originalValue == whenValue;
    }
}

Example Usage:

class MultithreadedClass
{
    private AtomicBoolean isUpdating = new AtomicBoolean(false);

    public void Update()
    {
        if (!this.isUpdating.FalseToTrue())
        {
            return; //a different thread is already updating
        }
        try
        {
            //... do update.
        }
        finally
        {
            this.isUpdating.Value = false; //we are done updating
        }
    }
}

Test cases (if you're going to use it in production):

[TestClass]
public class AtomicBooleanTest
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestAtomicBoolean()
    {
        AtomicBoolean b = new AtomicBoolean();
        Assert.IsFalse(b.Value);

        b = new AtomicBoolean(false);
        Assert.IsFalse(b.Value);

        b = new AtomicBoolean(true);
        Assert.IsTrue(b.Value);

        //when Value is already true, FalseToTrue fails
        b.Value = true;
        Assert.IsFalse(b.FalseToTrue());
        Assert.IsTrue(b.Value);

        //when Value is already false, TrueToFalse fails
        b.Value = false;
        Assert.IsFalse(b.TrueToFalse());
        Assert.IsFalse(b.Value);

        //Value not changed if SetWhen fails
        b.Value = false;
        Assert.IsFalse(b.SetWhen(true, true));
        Assert.IsFalse(b.Value);

        //Value not changed if SetWhen fails
        b.Value = true;
        Assert.IsFalse(b.SetWhen(false, false));
        Assert.IsTrue(b.Value);
    }
}
  • 2
    That seems a bit overcomplicated. How about having an AtomicBoolean class with a single static instance Truth, and interpreting any reference to Truth as true, and any other reference as false? – supercat Aug 2 '13 at 22:57
  • @supercat Updated to include an example of how I would use it; I think the use-case isn't too complicated. What I was going for is a boolean wrapper with atomic operations. What I think you're suggesting might work better with enums -- perhaps as part of a finite state machine (where changing between states needs to be atomic). – EthanB Aug 5 '13 at 14:53
  • 1
    My point was that if one defines AtomicBoolean as a class without a public constructor but with widening typecasts to and from bool (where true is a reference to the only instance that will ever exist and false is null) the Interlocked methods in the framework will work as-is with the expected semantics. Each variable of type AtomicBoolean will encapsulate an atomic boolean state, thus behaving as a variable of type Bool except for the lack of a public constructor. If AtomicBool wraps an Integer, each variable will encapsulate not an atomic state, but instead... – supercat Aug 5 '13 at 16:12
  • 1
    ...the identity of an object which holds an atomic Boolean state; if two variables hold references to the same instance, then an atomic operation performed on one will affect the state reported by both (since both variables would report the state of the same instance). – supercat Aug 5 '13 at 16:16
  • 1
    One comment (a year and a half later): As I understand the .NET memory model, you'll want to use Interlocked.Exchange in your Value setter, or else other threads are not guaranteed to see the written value immediately. Alternately, you could mark zeroOrOne as volatile. – Ben Feb 5 '15 at 20:30
10

You can use Interlocked.Exchange on an int for this:

int boolValue = 0;

// ...

if (System.Threading.Interlocked.Exchange(ref boolValue, 1) == 1)
{
    // Was True
}
else
{
    // Was False                
}
8

You can't use interlocked for Boolean. You're better off using an int instead.

http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/98293/interlocked-compareexchange-should-offer-an-overload-for-boolean

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.