10

I have a class with many fields which represents different physical values.

class Tunnel
{
    private double _length;
    private double _crossSectionArea;
    private double _airDensity;
    //...

Each field is exposed using read/write property. I need to check on setter that the value is correct and generate exception otherwise. All validations are similar:

    public double Length
    {
        get { return _length; }
        set
        {
            if (value <= 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("value",
                    "Length must be positive value.");
            _length = value;
        }
    }

    public double CrossSectionArea
    {
        get { return _crossSectionArea; }
        set
        {
            if (value <= 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("value",
                    "Cross-section area must be positive value.");
            _crossSectionArea = value;
        }
    }

    public double AirDensity
    {
        get { return _airDensity; }
        set
        {
            if (value < 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("value",
                    "Air density can't be negative value.");
            _airDensity = value;
        }
    }
    //...

Is there any elegant and flexible way to accomplish such validation?

  • I think the way you've done it is the correct way to go. The only change would be maybe create a validator function that you call whenever you are ready that checks all of your values at one time. In my experience, Visual Studio (don't know what you are using) seems to swallow exceptions that occur in a property setter. – jp2code Jul 12 '11 at 15:08
  • @jp2code, exceptions in setter works fine. Just checked. – Kyrylo M Jul 12 '11 at 15:10
7

Assuming you want this sort of behaviour, you might consider some helper methods, e.g.

public static double ValidatePositive(double input, string name)
{
    if (input <= 0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(name + " must be positive");
    }
    return input;
}

public static double ValidateNonNegative(double input, string name)
{
    if (input < 0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(name + " must not be negative");
    }
    return input;
}

Then you can write:

public double AirDensity
{
    get { return _airDensity; }
    set
    {            
        _airDensity = ValidationHelpers.ValidateNonNegative(value,
                                                            "Air density");
    }
}

If you need this for various types, you could even make it generic:

public static T ValidateNonNegative(T input, string name)
    where T : IComparable<T>
{
    if (input.CompareTo(default(T)) < 0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(name + " must not be negative");
    }
    return input;
}

Note that none of this is terribly i18n-friendly...

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for improving code. But I hasn't understood what you mean about "i18n-friendly"... – Kyrylo M Jul 12 '11 at 15:16
  • @archer: The messages are hard-coded as English. You'll have a bit more work ahead of you if you want to translate them into a different language. – Jon Skeet Jul 12 '11 at 15:16
  • OK. Thank you for explanation. – Kyrylo M Jul 12 '11 at 15:19
  • RATS! I like this one much better than the little validator routine I just wrote. I even invoked Thy name! :) – jp2code Jul 12 '11 at 15:20
4

All depends what technology you are using - if you're under MVC you can use Attributes, like this;

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee256141(v=vs.98).aspx

| improve this answer | |
  • Neither was I - the MVC attributes handle both client side and server side validation (see the Model.IsValid method) – Mikey Hogarth Jul 13 '11 at 11:17
4

Here's my version, it's a bit cleaner than Jon's version in some respects:

interface IValidator <T>
{
  bool Validate (T value);
}

class IntValidator : IValidator <int>
{
  public bool Validate (int value)
  {
    return value > 10 && value < 15;
  }
}
class Int2Validator : IValidator<int>
{
  public bool Validate (int value)
  {
    return value > 100 && value < 150;
  }
}

struct Property<T, P> where P : IValidator<T>, new ()
{
  public T Value
  {
    set
    {
      if (m_validator.Validate (value))
      {
        m_value = value;
      }
      else
      {
        Console.WriteLine ("Error validating: '" + value + "' is out of range.");
      }
    }

    get { return m_value; }
  }

  T m_value;
  static IValidator<T> m_validator=new P();
}

class Program
{
  static void Main (string [] args)
  {
    Program
      p = new Program ();

    p.m_p1.Value = 9;
    p.m_p1.Value = 12;
    p.m_p1.Value = 25;
    p.m_p2.Value = 90;
    p.m_p2.Value = 120;
    p.m_p2.Value = 250;
  }

  Property<int, IntValidator>
    m_p1;

  Property<int, Int2Validator>
    m_p2;
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Try to use such a method:

 public void FailOrProceed(Func<bool> validationFunction, Action proceedFunction, string errorMessage)
    {
        // !!! check for nulls, etc
        if (!validationFunction())
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(errorMessage);
        }

        proceedFunction();
    }
| improve this answer | |
1

Yes, by creating your own validation attributes.

Read this article: Business Object Validation Using Attributes in C#

I will have the decency of NOT copying it here :)

| improve this answer | |
1

Using the Validator function I mentioned in my comment above, I'd do something like this (untested code):

void textBox_Changed(object sender, EventArgs e) {
  submitButton.Enabled = validator();
}

bool validator() {
  const string NON_POSITIVE = "Value must be greater than Zero";
  bool result = false;
  string controlName = "Length";
  try {
    _length = Convert.ToDouble(txtLength.Text);
    if (_length <= 0) throw new Exception(NON_POSITIVE);
    controlName = "Cross Section Area";
    _crossSectionArea = Convert.ToDouble(txtCrossSectionArea.Text);
    if (_crossSectionArea <= 0) throw new Exception(NON_POSITIVE);
    controlName = "Air Density";
    _airDensity = Convert.ToDouble(txtAirDensity.Text);
    if (_airDensity <= 0) throw new Exception(NON_POSITIVE);
    result = true; // only do this step last
  } catch (Exception err) {
    MessageBox.Show(controlName + " Error: " + err.Message, "Input Error");
  }
  return result;
}

John Skeet probably has a better way, but this works. :)

| improve this answer | |
1

You can achieve this using classes from System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations

class Tunnel
{
    [Range(0, double.MaxValue, ErrorMessage = "Length must be positive value.")]
    public double Length { get; set; }
}

Validation:

var tunnel = new Tunnel { Length = 0 };
var context = new ValidationContext(tunnel, null, null);
Validator.ValidateObject(tunnel, context, true);

Also you can implement your own validation attributes overriding ValidationAttribute class

| improve this answer | |
  • This seems like it's going to introduce a bit of overhead surely? – Skizz Jul 12 '11 at 15:35
  • @Skizz, It is validation using attributes, no more. I don't like implement validation inside set accessor. – Kirill Polishchuk Jul 12 '11 at 15:43
  • what I was getting at was the run time connection between the property and the attribute. Maybe .net does something clever here. – Skizz Jul 12 '11 at 15:45
  • @Skizz, It depends on task, but many .NET frameworks such Entity Framework, WPF, ASP.NET MVC, etc use reflection. This validation is something like simple AOP version. – Kirill Polishchuk Jul 12 '11 at 15:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.