593

I want to define a two-dimensional array without an initialized length like this:

Matrix = [][]

but it does not work...

I've tried the code below, but it is wrong too:

Matrix = [5][5]

Error:

Traceback ...

IndexError: list index out of range

What is my mistake?

  • 10
    One does not define arrays, or any other thing. You can, however, create multidimensional sequences, as the answers here show. Remember that python variables are untyped, but values are strongly typed. – SingleNegationElimination Jul 12 '11 at 16:05
  • 24
    IMHO, The question is valid. It involves specific code that doesn't work; the answers told me what I needed to know, about an important, concrete, programming topic. Notice the # of upvotes, and even favorite marks. F.J's answer even showed a way that initialization can be done wrong, and why it is wrong. All very useful. – ToolmakerSteve Dec 7 '13 at 19:33
  • I'm confused. Coming from other languages: it IS a difference between an 1D-Array containing 1D-Arrays and a 2D-Array. And AFAIK there is no way of having a multi-dimensional-array (or list) in python. Should be said here... – Dirk Reichel Jun 5 '18 at 19:48

25 Answers 25

843

You're technically trying to index an uninitialized array. You have to first initialize the outer list with lists before adding items; Python calls this "list comprehension".

# Creates a list containing 5 lists, each of 8 items, all set to 0
w, h = 8, 5;
Matrix = [[0 for x in range(w)] for y in range(h)] 

You can now add items to the list:

Matrix[0][0] = 1
Matrix[6][0] = 3 # error! range... 
Matrix[0][6] = 3 # valid

print Matrix[0][0] # prints 1
x, y = 0, 6 
print Matrix[x][y] # prints 3; be careful with indexing! 

Although you can name them as you wish, I look at it this way to avoid some confusion that could arise with the indexing, if you use "x" for both the inner and outer lists, and want a non-square Matrix.

  • 181
    [[0 for x in range(cols_count)] for x in range(rows_count)] – songhir Nov 27 '14 at 2:48
  • 3
    Odd edit by ademar111190. In Python 3 there is no xrange but if you must use Python 2 then xrange is the correct function to use if you don't want to needlessly create objects. – Dave Nov 25 '15 at 7:29
  • 3
    @dave If you dont need it zero-filled, can use range to create the internal lists directly: [range(5) for x in range(5)] – alanjds Dec 9 '15 at 22:08
  • 2
    @alanjds - thats true, but you still create potentially many unnecessary object references in Python 2 for the outer iteration (try this with a VERY large range). Also, initialisation to some value is almost always what you want - and this is more often than not 0. range yields an iterable collection - xrange returns a generator. My point was that ademar "corrected" something that was actually more generally correct and efficient than his correction. – Dave Dec 10 '15 at 16:00
  • 4
    @6packkid the [0] * w part is nice, but [[0] * w] * h] will produce unexpected behavior. Try mat = [[0] * 3] * 3; mat[0][1] = 10; print(mat == [[0, 10, 0], [0, 10, 0], [0, 10, 0]]) and mat = [[0] * 3 for i in range(3)]; mat[0][1] = 10; print(mat == [[0, 10, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]). – senderle Jul 19 '17 at 15:45
350

If you really want a matrix, you might be better off using numpy. Matrix operations in numpy most often use an array type with two dimensions. There are many ways to create a new array; one of the most useful is the zeros function, which takes a shape parameter and returns an array of the given shape, with the values initialized to zero:

>>> import numpy
>>> numpy.zeros((5, 5))
array([[ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]])

numpy provides a matrix type as well. It's less commonly used, and some people recommend against using it. But it's useful for people coming to numpy from Matlab, and in some other contexts. I thought I'd include it since we're talking about matrices!

>>> numpy.matrix([[1, 2], [3, 4]])
matrix([[1, 2],
        [3, 4]])

Here are some other ways to create 2-d arrays and matrices (with output removed for compactness):

numpy.matrix('1 2; 3 4')                 # use Matlab-style syntax
numpy.arange(25).reshape((5, 5))         # create a 1-d range and reshape
numpy.array(range(25)).reshape((5, 5))   # pass a Python range and reshape
numpy.array([5] * 25).reshape((5, 5))    # pass a Python list and reshape
numpy.empty((5, 5))                      # allocate, but don't initialize
numpy.ones((5, 5))                       # initialize with ones
numpy.ndarray((5, 5))                    # use the low-level constructor
  • 65
    Whenever you want matrices, you want to use numpy. This answer should be first. – Pat B Jul 12 '11 at 16:14
  • 1
    For numerical matrices, numpy is king. I've had uses of two-dimensional arrays of generators, which I opted for the nested comprehension syntax. – Prashant Kumar Jul 12 '11 at 19:41
  • There's no need for reshape; you can call numpy.zeroes((5,5,...)) to create a multi-dimensional array. – user1071136 Dec 8 '13 at 20:03
  • 4
    I agree that numpy is the way to go for matrices in Python. But sometimes (for example a homework assignment) you just can't use it :( – dana Jan 10 '15 at 16:59
  • 1
    The fact that the question uses the English word "matrix" doesn't mean that they should use np.matrix to represent it. The proper way to represent a matrix in numpy is with an array. – user2357112 Nov 5 '17 at 20:39
292

Here is a shorter notation for initializing a list of lists:

matrix = [[0]*5 for i in range(5)]

Unfortunately shortening this to something like 5*[5*[0]] doesn't really work because you end up with 5 copies of the same list, so when you modify one of them they all change, for example:

>>> matrix = 5*[5*[0]]
>>> matrix
[[0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]
>>> matrix[4][4] = 2
>>> matrix
[[0, 0, 0, 0, 2], [0, 0, 0, 0, 2], [0, 0, 0, 0, 2], [0, 0, 0, 0, 2], [0, 0, 0, 0, 2]]
  • 107
    great comment about the shortening danger. – nbubis Jun 21 '13 at 22:46
  • 2
    Could you explain the logic behind the "shortening" failure? Why does python output copies of the same list in this case, and an array of different cells in the case of [0]*5? – mike622867 Mar 22 '15 at 23:00
  • 2
    I spent 30 minutes trying to figure this out before I realized my mistake – Parth Bhoiwala Aug 25 '17 at 19:05
  • 7
    The above comments are not exactly true: [0]*5 still creates a sequence with 5 times a reference to the same Object representing the number 0. But you will never notice this because 0 is immutable (I would say 0 behaves like a value - or you might think of it as a primitive data type - because it is immutable so you never get problems with references to same object instead of having copies.) – dreua Jan 26 '18 at 10:49
  • more pythonic: [[0]*5 for _ in range(5)] with anonymous loop counter you're not using – Jean-François Fabre Nov 11 '18 at 20:38
86

If you want to create an empty matrix, the correct syntax is

matrix = [[]]

And if you want to generate a matrix of size 5 filled with 0,

matrix = [[0 for i in xrange(5)] for i in xrange(5)]
  • 1
    I can not see what it is not [][] or [[][]]but rather [[]].. – Koray Tugay Jun 8 '18 at 1:41
  • @KorayTugay Because the matrix is represented using Python list(s) (the rows) nested inside another list (the columns). – elig Jul 2 '18 at 13:06
  • For Python-3 use range function instead xrange func – Rakesh Chaudhari Aug 28 '18 at 4:25
71

If all you want is a two dimensional container to hold some elements, you could conveniently use a dictionary instead:

Matrix = {}

Then you can do:

Matrix[1,2] = 15
print Matrix[1,2]

This works because 1,2 is a tuple, and you're using it as a key to index the dictionary. The result is similar to a dumb sparse matrix.

As indicated by osa and Josap Valls, you can also use Matrix = collections.defaultdict(lambda:0) so that the missing elements have a default value of 0.

Vatsal further points that this method is probably not very efficient for large matrices and should only be used in non performance-critical parts of the code.

  • 1
    Then you can also do import collections; Matrix = collections.defaultdict(float), to substitute zeros for uninitialized elements. – osa Oct 22 '15 at 16:17
  • 2
    Wouldn't accessing a dict for tuple(1,2) as key have a worst case complexity of O(n). As internally it would hash the tuples. Whereas using an 2D array would give O(1) time complexity to access index [1,2] access . So using dict for this should not be good choice. – Vatsal Nov 16 '15 at 12:25
  • @Vatsal wiki.python.org/moin/TimeComplexity says that the average case is O(1), but you're right about the worst case. Anyway, unless you're talking about A LOT OF ITEMS you wouldn't care about this difference. As a matter of fact, I would be worried more about memory than access time. – enobayram Nov 16 '15 at 13:38
  • Also we always try to avoid use of dicts until the overall complexity of the algorithm is equal or greater than O(n^2). As an 'n' times O(n) accesses would give a O(n^2) complexity. – Vatsal Nov 16 '15 at 14:28
  • @enobayram , Sorry but I do not agree. Asymptotic analysis will always give O(n^2) , if a worst case O(n) access is done 'n' times. Where as Amortized analysis can give a lesser bound. And there is a huge difference between amortized and average case ... please refer before making any assumptions and vague comments – Vatsal Nov 17 '15 at 4:10
37

In Python you will be creating a list of lists. You do not have to declare the dimensions ahead of time, but you can. For example:

matrix = []
matrix.append([])
matrix.append([])
matrix[0].append(2)
matrix[1].append(3)

Now matrix[0][0] == 2 and matrix[1][0] == 3. You can also use the list comprehension syntax. This example uses it twice over to build a "two-dimensional list":

from itertools import count, takewhile
matrix = [[i for i in takewhile(lambda j: j < (k+1) * 10, count(k*10))] for k in range(10)]
  • 5
    extend would also be helpful in the first case: If you start with m = [[]], then you could add to the inner list (extend a row) with m[0].extend([1,2]), and add to the outer list (append a new row) with m.append([3,4]), those operations would leave you with [[1, 2], [3, 4]]. – askewchan Oct 9 '13 at 16:59
19

The accepted answer is good and correct, but it took me a while to understand that I could also use it to create a completely empty array.

l =  [[] for _ in range(3)]

results in

[[], [], []]
17

You should make a list of lists, and the best way is to use nested comprehensions:

>>> matrix = [[0 for i in range(5)] for j in range(5)]
>>> pprint.pprint(matrix)
[[0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]

On your [5][5] example, you are creating a list with an integer "5" inside, and try to access its 5th item, and that naturally raises an IndexError because there is no 5th item:

>>> l = [5]
>>> l[5]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
IndexError: list index out of range
  • Actually the sequence for row_index('i') and column_index('j') are as follows: '>>> matrix = [[0 for column_index in range(5)] for row_index in range(5)]' – Aniruddha Kalburgi Sep 30 '18 at 1:45
10

To declare a matrix of zeros (ones):

numpy.zeros((x, y))

e.g.

>>> numpy.zeros((3, 5))
    array([[ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
   [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
   [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]])

or numpy.ones((x, y)) e.g.

>>> np.ones((3, 5))
array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
   [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
   [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.]])

Even three dimensions are possible. (http://www.astro.ufl.edu/~warner/prog/python.html see --> Multi-dimensional arrays)

10
rows = int(input())
cols = int(input())

matrix = []
for i in range(rows):
  row = []
  for j in range(cols):
    row.append(0)
  matrix.append(row)

print(matrix)

Why such a long code, that too in Python you ask?

Long back when I was not comfortable with Python, I saw the single line answers for writing 2D matrix and told myself I am not going to use 2-D matrix in Python again. (Those single lines were pretty scary and It didn't give me any information on what Python was doing. Also note that I am not aware of these shorthands.)

Anyways, here's the code for a beginner whose coming from C, CPP and Java background

Note to Python Lovers and Experts: Please do not down vote just because I wrote a detailed code.

9

A rewrite for easy reading:

# 2D array/ matrix

# 5 rows, 5 cols
rows_count = 5
cols_count = 5

# create
#     creation looks reverse
#     create an array of "cols_count" cols, for each of the "rows_count" rows
#        all elements are initialized to 0
two_d_array = [[0 for j in range(cols_count)] for i in range(rows_count)]

# index is from 0 to 4
#     for both rows & cols
#     since 5 rows, 5 cols

# use
two_d_array[0][0] = 1
print two_d_array[0][0]  # prints 1   # 1st row, 1st col (top-left element of matrix)

two_d_array[1][0] = 2
print two_d_array[1][0]  # prints 2   # 2nd row, 1st col

two_d_array[1][4] = 3
print two_d_array[1][4]  # prints 3   # 2nd row, last col

two_d_array[4][4] = 4
print two_d_array[4][4]  # prints 4   # last row, last col (right, bottom element of matrix)
9

I'm on my first Python script, and I was a little confused by the square matrix example so I hope the below example will help you save some time:

 # Creates a 2 x 5 matrix
 Matrix = [[0 for y in xrange(5)] for x in xrange(2)]

so that

Matrix[1][4] = 2 # Valid
Matrix[4][1] = 3 # IndexError: list index out of range
9

Use:

matrix = [[0]*5 for i in range(5)]

The *5 for the first dimension works because at this level the data is immutable.

  • I would probably write this as matrix = [[0]*cols for _ in range(rows)] – Shital Shah Feb 20 at 1:20
7

Using NumPy you can initialize empty matrix like this:

import numpy as np
mm = np.matrix([])

And later append data like this:

mm = np.append(mm, [[1,2]], axis=1)
  • whatwould be the pros and cons of using numpy rather than "list comprehension" ? – ThePassenger Mar 19 '18 at 22:11
6

I read in comma separated files like this:

data=[]
for l in infile:
    l = split(',')
    data.append(l)

The list "data" is then a list of lists with index data[row][col]

6

This is how I usually create 2D arrays in python.

col = 3
row = 4
array = [[0] * col for _ in range(row)]

I find this syntax easy to remember compared to using to for loops in a list comprehension.

4

Use:

import copy

def ndlist(*args, init=0):
    dp = init
    for x in reversed(args):
        dp = [copy.deepcopy(dp) for _ in range(x)]
    return dp

l = ndlist(1,2,3,4) # 4 dimensional list initialized with 0's
l[0][1][2][3] = 1

I do think NumPy is the way to go. The above is a generic one if you don't want to use NumPy.

  • I like this attempt at doing something simple with vanilla Python without having to use numpy. – Rick Henderson Jun 7 '16 at 1:01
4

If you want to be able to think it as a 2D array rather than being forced to think in term of a list of lists (much more natural in my opinion), you can do the following:

import numpy
Nx=3; Ny=4
my2Dlist= numpy.zeros((Nx,Ny)).tolist()

The result is a list (not a NumPy array), and you can overwrite the individual positions with numbers, strings, whatever.

  • are numpy.matrix equivalent to numpy.zeros without zeros without being list? – ThePassenger Mar 19 '18 at 22:14
3
# Creates a list containing 5 lists initialized to 0
Matrix = [[0]*5]*5

Be careful about this short expression, see full explanation down in @F.J's answer

  • 15
    Be careful in this way, because Matrix[0], Matrix[1], ..., Matrix[4] all point to the same array, so after Matrix[0][0] = 3, you would expect Matrix[0][0] == Matrix[1][0] == ... == Matrix[4][0] == 3. – gongzhitaao Apr 3 '14 at 19:38
  • Thanks gongzhitaao for your comment. Had I read it elier it would have saved me at least half an hour.. Having a matrix where each row points to the same place in memory doesn't seem to be very useful, and if you are not aware of what you are doing it even is dangerous! I am pretty sure this is NOT what Masoud Abasian, who asked the question, wants to do. – Adrian Nov 20 '14 at 2:18
  • 4
    You should remove this answer, since it's not correct answer. Beginners might be confused. – cxxl Nov 25 '16 at 20:58
  • What answer are you referring to? I don't see a user with the name "F.J" (not even in deleted answers). – Peter Mortensen Nov 12 '17 at 13:18
3

That's what dictionary is made for!

matrix = {}

You can define keys and values in two ways:

matrix[0,0] = value

or

matrix = { (0,0)  : value }

Result:

   [ value,  value,  value,  value,  value],
   [ value,  value,  value,  value,  value],
   ...
2

If you don't have size information before start then create two one-dimensional lists.

list 1: To store rows list 2: Actual two-dimensional matrix

Store the entire row in the 1st list. Once done, append list 1 into list 2:

from random import randint


coordinates=[]
temp=[]
points=int(raw_input("Enter No Of Coordinates >"))
for i in range(0,points):
    randomx=randint(0,1000)
    randomy=randint(0,1000)
    temp=[]
    temp.append(randomx)
    temp.append(randomy)
    coordinates.append(temp)

print coordinates

Output:

Enter No Of Coordinates >4
[[522, 96], [378, 276], [349, 741], [238, 439]]
2

by using list :

matrix_in_python  = [['Roy',80,75,85,90,95],['John',75,80,75,85,100],['Dave',80,80,80,90,95]]

by using dict: you can also store this info in the hash table for fast searching like

matrix = { '1':[0,0] , '2':[0,1],'3':[0,2],'4' : [1,0],'5':[1,1],'6':[1,2],'7':[2,0],'8':[2,1],'9':[2,2]};

matrix['1'] will give you result in O(1) time

*nb: you need to deal with a collision in the hash table

0
l=[[0]*(L) for i in range(W)]

Will be faster than:

l = [[0 for x in range(L)] for y in range(W)] 
  • Duplicate answer of one already answered below. Also [[0]*(L) for i in range(W)] should be [[0]*(L) for _ in range(W)] since i isn't used anywhere – Ayush Vatsyayan Jan 8 at 3:39
0

Try this:

rows = int(input('Enter rows\n'))
my_list = []
for i in range(rows):
    my_list.append(list(map(int, input().split())))
0

In case if you need a matrix with predefined numbers you can use the following code:

def matrix(rows, cols, start=0):
    return [[c + start + r * cols for c in range(cols)] for r in range(rows)]


assert matrix(2, 3, 1) == [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]]

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