1

I want to replace all occurrences of 2 with 3.I want to do this without using the value of the index because that would be hardcoding. What I have so far is:


list=[1,2,3,4,2,34,2]

replace_at(list, index, value)

Enum.each list, fn(x) ->
if x==2 do
  replace_at(list, index, 3)
end

Enum.each list, fn(x) ->
IO.puts x
end

3 Answers 3

8

In Elixir, you do not have arrays, but linked list. If you simply want to replace all ocurrences of 2 with 3, you can use the map function, of the Enum module like this:

iex(1)> Enum.map(list, fn x -> if x == 2, do: 3, else: x end)
[1, 3, 3, 4, 3, 34, 3]

You could also use pattern matching:

iex(1)> Enum.map(list, fn
...(1)> 2 -> 3
...(1)> x -> x
...(1)> end)
1
  • You can even one-line it: Enum.map(list, fn 2 -> 3; x -> x end) (but not for long, as the formatter will convert it to multi-line by default if you use it). Mar 19, 2021 at 9:51
3

It is essential to know that Elixir is immutable, so you cannot replace values in a list; actually, you create a new list.

You can use the map method from Enum module, where you can found a bunch of algorithms to deal with enumerables.

iex(2)> [1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 34, 2] |> Enum.map(fn
...(2)>   2 -> 3
...(2)>   other -> other
...(2)> end)
[1, 3, 3, 4, 3, 34, 3]

A method with this implementation could be like the code below:

defmodule Replace do

  def replace_all(list, from, to) do
    list
    |> Enum.map(fn
      ^from -> to
      other -> other
    end)
  end

end
0
0

We don’t have arrays, and access by index is costly.

If you still want to accomplish it, Enum.with_index/2 is your friend.

replace_at = fn list, index, value -> 
  list
  |> Enum.with_index()
  |> Enum.map(fn
    {_, ^index} -> value # match index
    {value, _} -> value  # anything else   
  end)
end

And use it like

# index      0  1  2  3  4  5   6  
replace_at.([1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 34, 2], 2, 42)
#⇒ [1, 2, 42, 4, 2, 34, 2]

Replacing all 2s has nothing to do with the index, one does not need the index to do it. Just use Enum.map/2 out of the box.


Also, you should learn that Enum.each/2 does not modify anything ever.

2
  • Re: replace_at: List.replace_at/3 would do the same out of the box and be more efficient I believe, since it should be able to reuse the right part of the list and does not have to walk the full list (but it is still costly and not equivalent to an array).
    – sabiwara
    Mar 19, 2021 at 12:40
  • 1
    The purpose of this answer was mostly to show how we deal with indices in lists if needed. Enum.reduce_while/3 instead of Enum.map/2 and we’ll get to the List.replace_at/3 implementation. Also, put_in/3 + Access.at/2. Mar 19, 2021 at 13:17

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