Given a set of latitude and longitude points, how can I calculate the latitude and longitude of the center point of that set (aka a point that would center a view on all points)?

EDIT: Python solution I've used:

Convert lat/lon (must be in radians) to Cartesian coordinates for each location.
X = cos(lat) * cos(lon)
Y = cos(lat) * sin(lon)
Z = sin(lat)

Compute average x, y and z coordinates.
x = (x1 + x2 + ... + xn) / n
y = (y1 + y2 + ... + yn) / n
z = (z1 + z2 + ... + zn) / n

Convert average x, y, z coordinate to latitude and longitude.
Lon = atan2(y, x)
Hyp = sqrt(x * x + y * y)
Lat = atan2(z, hyp)
  • 2
    Regarding your solution: Probably your errors won't be too big with your assumption of a spherical earth, but earth is better describes as an ellipsoid. – John Jul 14 '11 at 3:46
  • Wrote this as a python function and shared it at gist.github.com/3718961 – Alvin Sep 14 '12 at 0:30
  • 14
    It is very important to note that this assumes that your lat and long are in radians! I was scratching my head for a while not realizing that. To convert to radians from decimal, multiply the decimal * pi/180. Then to convert back from radians to decimal, multiply by 180/pi. HTH – Ryan Guill Nov 20 '12 at 15:47
  • @zeke Let's refer to a spherical Earth and normalize distances with respect to R, the Earth's radius. Take two points on the Equator, expressing their positions in rectangular coordinates: P1=(1,0,0) and P2=(0,1,0). The center point, by your approach, is Pc=(0.5,0.5,0) and its distance from the centre of the Earth is d=sqrt(0.5)~0.7. Is this, a point ~1900km beneath the surface, exactly what you want? – gboffi Oct 19 '14 at 22:40
  • Sorry for being late, but I was wondering, what's the math behind this algorithm, could someone advise me some readings where this is explained? Thanks! – tonix Nov 4 '15 at 15:18

13 Answers 13

up vote 42 down vote accepted

The simple approach of just averaging them has weird edge cases with angles when they wrap from 359' back to 0'.

A much earlier question on SO asked about finding the average of a set of compass angles.

An expansion of the approach recommended there for spherical coordinates would be:

  • Convert each lat/long pair into a unit-length 3D vector.
  • Sum each of those vectors
  • Normalise the resulting vector
  • Convert back to spherical coordinates
  • 4
    Seems good, I did something similar based on what I found at this web site: geomidpoint.com/calculation.html. – zeke Jul 13 '11 at 16:37
  • 3
    downvoter - please explain, and offer a better solution if you can. – Alnitak Feb 12 '13 at 17:16

Thanks! Here is a C# version of OP's solutions using degrees. It utilises the System.Device.Location.GeoCoordinate class

    public static GeoCoordinate GetCentralGeoCoordinate(
        IList<GeoCoordinate> geoCoordinates)
    {
        if (geoCoordinates.Count == 1)
        {
            return geoCoordinates.Single();
        }

        double x = 0;
        double y = 0;
        double z = 0;

        foreach (var geoCoordinate in geoCoordinates)
        {
            var latitude = geoCoordinate.Latitude * Math.PI / 180;
            var longitude = geoCoordinate.Longitude * Math.PI / 180;

            x += Math.Cos(latitude) * Math.Cos(longitude);
            y += Math.Cos(latitude) * Math.Sin(longitude);
            z += Math.Sin(latitude);
        }

        var total = geoCoordinates.Count;

        x = x / total;
        y = y / total;
        z = z / total;

        var centralLongitude = Math.Atan2(y, x);
        var centralSquareRoot = Math.Sqrt(x * x + y * y);
        var centralLatitude = Math.Atan2(z, centralSquareRoot);

        return new GeoCoordinate(centralLatitude * 180 / Math.PI, centralLongitude * 180 / Math.PI);
    }

I found this post very useful so here is the solution in PHP. I've been using this successfully and just wanted to save another dev some time.

/**
 * Get a center latitude,longitude from an array of like geopoints
 *
 * @param array data 2 dimensional array of latitudes and longitudes
 * For Example:
 * $data = array
 * (
 *   0 = > array(45.849382, 76.322333),
 *   1 = > array(45.843543, 75.324143),
 *   2 = > array(45.765744, 76.543223),
 *   3 = > array(45.784234, 74.542335)
 * );
*/
function GetCenterFromDegrees($data)
{
    if (!is_array($data)) return FALSE;

    $num_coords = count($data);

    $X = 0.0;
    $Y = 0.0;
    $Z = 0.0;

    foreach ($data as $coord)
    {
        $lat = $coord[0] * pi() / 180;
        $lon = $coord[1] * pi() / 180;

        $a = cos($lat) * cos($lon);
        $b = cos($lat) * sin($lon);
        $c = sin($lat);

        $X += $a;
        $Y += $b;
        $Z += $c;
    }

    $X /= $num_coords;
    $Y /= $num_coords;
    $Z /= $num_coords;

    $lon = atan2($Y, $X);
    $hyp = sqrt($X * $X + $Y * $Y);
    $lat = atan2($Z, $hyp);

    return array($lat * 180 / pi(), $lon * 180 / pi());
}
  • 1
    I've used this solution but it gives a somehow wrong solution - if I search the center of some coordinates on a map it kind of "weighs" the points and tends to stay where there are more points. – LowFieldTheory Jul 28 '14 at 7:53
  • 4
    @Novalink that's what an average does... – Alnitak Jul 30 '15 at 17:12
  • 2
    @Alnitak Here we want to search the center of the area circumscribed by the coordinates. Are you sure you commented on the right place? – LowFieldTheory Jul 31 '15 at 0:19

Very useful post! I've implemented this in JavaScript, hereby my code. I've used this successfully.

function rad2degr(rad) { return rad * 180 / Math.PI; }
function degr2rad(degr) { return degr * Math.PI / 180; }

/**
 * @param latLngInDeg array of arrays with latitude and longtitude
 *   pairs in degrees. e.g. [[latitude1, longtitude1], [latitude2
 *   [longtitude2] ...]
 *
 * @return array with the center latitude longtitude pairs in 
 *   degrees.
 */
function getLatLngCenter(latLngInDegr) {
    var LATIDX = 0;
    var LNGIDX = 1;
    var sumX = 0;
    var sumY = 0;
    var sumZ = 0;

    for (var i=0; i<latLngInDegr.length; i++) {
        var lat = degr2rad(latLngInDegr[i][LATIDX]);
        var lng = degr2rad(latLngInDegr[i][LNGIDX]);
        // sum of cartesian coordinates
        sumX += Math.cos(lat) * Math.cos(lng);
        sumY += Math.cos(lat) * Math.sin(lng);
        sumZ += Math.sin(lat);
    }

    var avgX = sumX / latLngInDegr.length;
    var avgY = sumY / latLngInDegr.length;
    var avgZ = sumZ / latLngInDegr.length;

    // convert average x, y, z coordinate to latitude and longtitude
    var lng = Math.atan2(avgY, avgX);
    var hyp = Math.sqrt(avgX * avgX + avgY * avgY);
    var lat = Math.atan2(avgZ, hyp);

    return ([rad2degr(lat), rad2degr(lng)]);
}

  • 1
    I know the post is old, but could you please post a reference or something explaining the Math behind the algorithm you posted? Thanks! – tonix Nov 4 '15 at 14:31
  • Its quite deep..! – Brent Mar 8 '16 at 15:18
  • Worked Perfectly! Thanks – andrewoodleyjr Feb 24 at 20:40

In the interest of possibly saving someone a minute or two, here is the solution that was used in Objective-C instead of python. This version takes an NSArray of NSValues that contain MKMapCoordinates, which was called for in my implementation:

#import <MapKit/MKGeometry.h>
+ (CLLocationCoordinate2D)centerCoordinateForCoordinates:(NSArray *)coordinateArray {
    double x = 0;
    double y = 0;
    double z = 0;

    for(NSValue *coordinateValue in coordinateArray) {
        CLLocationCoordinate2D coordinate = [coordinateValue MKCoordinateValue];

        double lat = GLKMathDegreesToRadians(coordinate.latitude);
        double lon = GLKMathDegreesToRadians(coordinate.longitude);
        x += cos(lat) * cos(lon);
        y += cos(lat) * sin(lon);
        z += sin(lat);
    }

    x = x / (double)coordinateArray.count;
    y = y / (double)coordinateArray.count;
    z = z / (double)coordinateArray.count;

    double resultLon = atan2(y, x);
    double resultHyp = sqrt(x * x + y * y);
    double resultLat = atan2(z, resultHyp);

    CLLocationCoordinate2D result = CLLocationCoordinate2DMake(GLKMathRadiansToDegrees(resultLat), GLKMathRadiansToDegrees(resultLon));
    return result;
}
  • 1
    For anyone out there, for what its worth, Instead of using your own macro for degrees to radians, import <GLKit/GLKMath.h> and use GLKMathDegreesToRadians and GLKMathRadiansToDegrees – pnizzle Sep 13 '16 at 6:33

Javascript version of the original function

/**
 * Get a center latitude,longitude from an array of like geopoints
 *
 * @param array data 2 dimensional array of latitudes and longitudes
 * For Example:
 * $data = array
 * (
 *   0 = > array(45.849382, 76.322333),
 *   1 = > array(45.843543, 75.324143),
 *   2 = > array(45.765744, 76.543223),
 *   3 = > array(45.784234, 74.542335)
 * );
*/
function GetCenterFromDegrees(data)
{       
    if (!(data.length > 0)){
        return false;
    } 

    var num_coords = data.length;

    var X = 0.0;
    var Y = 0.0;
    var Z = 0.0;

    for(i = 0; i < data.length; i++){
        var lat = data[i][0] * Math.PI / 180;
        var lon = data[i][1] * Math.PI / 180;

        var a = Math.cos(lat) * Math.cos(lon);
        var b = Math.cos(lat) * Math.sin(lon);
        var c = Math.sin(lat);

        X += a;
        Y += b;
        Z += c;
    }

    X /= num_coords;
    Y /= num_coords;
    Z /= num_coords;

    var lon = Math.atan2(Y, X);
    var hyp = Math.sqrt(X * X + Y * Y);
    var lat = Math.atan2(Z, hyp);

    var newX = (lat * 180 / Math.PI);
    var newY = (lon * 180 / Math.PI);

    return new Array(newX, newY);
}

If you are interested in obtaining a very simplified 'center' of the points (for example, to simply center a map to the center of your gmaps polygon), then here's a basic approach that worked for me.

public function center() {
    $minlat = false;
    $minlng = false;
    $maxlat = false;
    $maxlng = false;
    $data_array = json_decode($this->data, true);
    foreach ($data_array as $data_element) {
        $data_coords = explode(',',$data_element);
        if (isset($data_coords[1])) {
            if ($minlat === false) { $minlat = $data_coords[0]; } else { $minlat = ($data_coords[0] < $minlat) ? $data_coords[0] : $minlat; }
            if ($maxlat === false) { $maxlat = $data_coords[0]; } else { $maxlat = ($data_coords[0] > $maxlat) ? $data_coords[0] : $maxlat; }
            if ($minlng === false) { $minlng = $data_coords[1]; } else { $minlng = ($data_coords[1] < $minlng) ? $data_coords[1] : $minlng; }
            if ($maxlng === false) { $maxlng = $data_coords[1]; } else { $maxlng = ($data_coords[1] > $maxlng) ? $data_coords[1] : $maxlng; }
        }
    }
    $lat = $maxlat - (($maxlat - $minlat) / 2);
    $lng = $maxlng - (($maxlng - $minlng) / 2);
    return $lat.','.$lng;
}

This returns the middle lat/lng coordinate for the center of a polygon.

very nice solutions, just what i needed for my swift project, so here's a swift port. thanks & here's also a playground project: https://github.com/ppoh71/playgounds/tree/master/centerLocationPoint.playground

/*
* calculate the center point of multiple latitude longitude coordinate-pairs
*/

import CoreLocation
import GLKit

var LocationPoints = [CLLocationCoordinate2D]()

//add some points to Location ne, nw, sw, se , it's a rectangle basicaly
LocationPoints.append(CLLocationCoordinate2D(latitude: 37.627512369999998, longitude: -122.38780611999999))
LocationPoints.append(CLLocationCoordinate2D(latitude: 37.627512369999998, longitude:  -122.43105867))
LocationPoints.append(CLLocationCoordinate2D(latitude: 37.56502528, longitude: -122.43105867))
LocationPoints.append(CLLocationCoordinate2D(latitude: 37.56502528, longitude: -122.38780611999999))

// center func
func getCenterCoord(LocationPoints: [CLLocationCoordinate2D]) -> CLLocationCoordinate2D{

    var x:Float = 0.0;
    var y:Float = 0.0;
    var z:Float = 0.0;

    for points in LocationPoints {

     let lat = GLKMathDegreesToRadians(Float(points.latitude));
     let long = GLKMathDegreesToRadians(Float(points.longitude));

        x += cos(lat) * cos(long);
        y += cos(lat) * sin(long);
        z += sin(lat);
    }

    x = x / Float(LocationPoints.count);
    y = y / Float(LocationPoints.count);
    z = z / Float(LocationPoints.count);

    let resultLong = atan2(y, x);
    let resultHyp = sqrt(x * x + y * y);
    let resultLat = atan2(z, resultHyp);



    let result = CLLocationCoordinate2D(latitude: CLLocationDegrees(GLKMathRadiansToDegrees(Float(resultLat))), longitude: CLLocationDegrees(GLKMathRadiansToDegrees(Float(resultLong))));

    return result;

}

//get the centerpoint
var centerPoint = getCenterCoord(LocationPoints)
print("Latitude: \(centerPoint.latitude) / Longitude: \(centerPoint.longitude)")
  • I wish I could give you more points. Thanks!!! – Andrew McKinley Aug 5 '16 at 18:06

In Django this is trivial (and actually works, I had issues with a number of the solutions not correctly returning negatives for latitude).

For instance, let's say you are using django-geopostcodes (of which I am the author).

from django.contrib.gis.geos import MultiPoint
from django.contrib.gis.db.models.functions import Distance
from django_geopostcodes.models import Locality

qs = Locality.objects.anything_icontains('New York')
points = [locality.point for locality in qs]
multipoint = MultiPoint(*points)
point = multipoint.centroid

point is a Django Point instance that can then be used to do things such as retrieve all objects that are within 10km of that centre point;

Locality.objects.filter(point__distance_lte=(point, D(km=10)))\
    .annotate(distance=Distance('point', point))\
    .order_by('distance')

Changing this to raw Python is trivial;

from django.contrib.gis.geos import Point, MultiPoint

points = [
    Point((145.137075, -37.639981)),
    Point((144.137075, -39.639981)),
]
multipoint = MultiPoint(*points)
point = multipoint.centroid

Under the hood Django is using GEOS - more details at https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.10/ref/contrib/gis/geos/

This is is the same as a weighted average problem where all the weights are the same, and there are two dimensions.

Find the average of all latitudes for your center latitude and the average of all longitudes for the center longitude.

Caveat Emptor: This is a close distance approximation and the error will become unruly when the deviations from the mean are more than a few miles due to the curvature of the Earth. Remember that latitudes and longitudes are degrees (not really a grid).

If you wish to take into account the ellipsoid being used you can find the formulae here http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/gps/docs/A_Guide_to_Coordinate_Systems_in_Great_Britain.pdf

see Annexe B

The document contains lots of other useful stuff

B

If you want all points to be visible in the image, you'd want the extrema in latitude and longitude and make sure that your view includes those values with whatever border you want.

(From Alnitak's answer, how you calculate the extrema may be a little problematic, but if they're a few degrees on either side of the longitude that wraps around, then you'll call the shot and take the right range.)

If you don't want to distort whatever map that these points are on, then adjust the bounding box's aspect ratio so that it fits whatever pixels you've allocated to the view but still includes the extrema.

To keep the points centered at some arbitrary zooming level, calculate the center of the bounding box that "just fits" the points as above, and keep that point as the center point.

Out of object in PHP. Given array of coordinate pairs, returns center.

/**
 * Calculate center of given coordinates
 * @param  array    $coordinates    Each array of coordinate pairs
 * @return array                    Center of coordinates
 */
function getCoordsCenter($coordinates) {    
    $lats = $lons = array();
    foreach ($coordinates as $key => $value) {
        array_push($lats, $value[0]);
        array_push($lons, $value[1]);
    }
    $minlat = min($lats);
    $maxlat = max($lats);
    $minlon = min($lons);
    $maxlon = max($lons);
    $lat = $maxlat - (($maxlat - $minlat) / 2);
    $lng = $maxlon - (($maxlon - $minlon) / 2);
    return array("lat" => $lat, "lon" => $lng);
}

Taken idea from #4

  • This would not work for coordinates crossing the 180th meridian. For example, two longitudal points, -175 and 175 would return a center of 0 in your algorithm, whereby the real center would be either -180 or 180. – Winch Oct 13 at 19:17

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