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I am looking for a way to automatically determine, e.g., that (a < 12) & (a < 3) & (c >= 4) is the same as (a < 3) & (c >= 4). I looked into Matlab's symbolic toolbox and SymPy in Python, but these are apparently only capable of simplifying purely Boolean logic (e.g., simplify(a & b | b & a) -> ans=(a & b))

Is there a way of using these symbolic math tools like described above?

Edit

As noted in the comment to @user12750353's answer, I would like to also simplify systems of relations that are concatenated with a Boolean OR, e.g., ((a < 12) & (a < 3) & (c >= 4)) | (a < 1).

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    Shouldn't the first expression be congruent to (a < 12) & (c >= 4)? Mathematically, this would make more sense, because all solutions of a < 3 are solutions of a < 12. Or, are we looking for the intersection of the inequalities, i.e. a < 12 ∩ a < 3?
    – Jacob Lee
    Mar 22, 2021 at 14:46
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    FWIW you can try fourier_elim in Maxima which implements a version of Fourier-Motzkin elimination. Mar 22, 2021 at 15:34
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    Is it always simple relational expressions like in your example? I think you can try using equivalents, like (a < 12) is the same as max(a+1,12)==12 (assuming a is an integer)
    – Mark H
    Mar 22, 2021 at 19:40
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    Actually, it seems like SymPy is buggy when it comes to using the max function in that way. Here, I'm testing it with (a <= 4) & (a <= 6) and it simplifies it to always False! simplify(Eq(Max(4, a), 4) & Eq(Max(6, a), 6)) => False. But if I evaluate that expression instead of simplifying it (Eq(Max(6,a),6) & Eq(Max(4,a),4)).subs({a:3}) I get True
    – Mark H
    Mar 22, 2021 at 20:36
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    @JacobLee: (a < 12) & (a < 3) is true when a < 3, not for larger values of a. The & operator is the Boolean AND, and corresponds to an intersection, not a union. OP is looking for a simplified expression that yields the same result for any given input. Mar 24, 2021 at 13:53

2 Answers 2

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+50

SymPy sets can be used to do univariate simplification, e.g. ((x < 3) & (x < 5)).as_set() -> Interval.open(-oo, 3) and sets can be converted back to relationals. The following converts a complex expression to cnf form, separates args with respect to free symbols and simplifies those that are univariate while leaving multivariate arguments unchanged.

def f(eq):
    from collections import defaultdict
    from sympy import to_cnf, ordered
    cnf = to_cnf(eq)
    args = defaultdict(list)
    for a in cnf.args:
        args[tuple(ordered(a.free_symbols))].append(a)
    _args = []
    for k in args:
        if len(k) == 1:
            _args.append(cnf.func(*args[k]).as_set().as_relational(k[0]))
        else:
            _args.append(cnf.func(*args[k]))
    return cnf.func(*_args)

For example:

>>> from sympy.abc import a, c
>>> f((a < 1) | ((c >= 4) & (a < 3) & (a < 12)))
(a < 3) & ((c >= 4) | (a < 1))
3

You can take a look in sympy inequality solvers for some options.

I could apply reduce_inequalities to your problem

from sympy.abc import a, c
import sympy.solvers.inequalities as neq
t = neq.reduce_inequalities([a < 12, a < 3, c >= 4])

And it results (4 <= c) & (-oo < a) & (a < 3) & (c < oo)

It also works with some more complex examples enter image description here

as long as you have one variable per inequality.

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    Thank you, that works great! Is it also possible, though, to work out systems with alternative conditions (i.e., Boolean OR)? Like ((a < 12) & (c >= 4) & (a < 3)) | (a < 1)
    – japhwil
    Mar 23, 2021 at 17:29
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    I am not sure if when you have only linear equations and you are intersecting them you have a simple domain. If you have a complicated logic I would try to put it in the conjunctive normal form, simplify each term separately. Then simplify the pairs of terms that have overlaps. But this is a whole new program.
    – Bob
    Mar 23, 2021 at 18:06

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