44

I want to be able to parse any URL with Ruby to get the main part of the domain without the www (just the example.com)

1
  • Ruby does not handle hostname matching correctly under all conditions when matching an end entity server cert. I'm aware of some unexpected and nonsensical results.
    – jww
    Apr 9 '14 at 18:57
86

Please note there is no algorithmic method of finding the highest level at which a domain may be registered for a particular top-level domain (the policies differ with each registry), the only method is to create a list of all top-level domains and the level at which domains can be registered.

This is the reason why the Public Suffix List exists.

I'm the author of PublicSuffix, a Ruby library that decomposes a domain into the different parts.

Here's an example

require 'uri/http'

uri = URI.parse("http://toolbar.google.com")
domain = PublicSuffix.parse(uri.host)
# => "toolbar.google.com"
domain.domain
# => "google.com"

uri = URI.parse("http://www.google.co.uk")
domain = PublicSuffix.parse(uri.host)
# => "www.google.co.uk"
domain.domain
# => "google.co.uk"
5
  • 2
    Is the last domain.domain #=> "google.com" a mistake or am I not understanding something??
    – Mischa
    Dec 5 '12 at 7:49
  • 1
    No, it's not a mistake. The first domain is a variable, the second is the method call. The variable can be called whatever you want. Dec 5 '12 at 11:49
  • "This is the reason why the Public Suffix List exists..." - I don't believe the 'main' domain and an entry in the PSL are the same thing. The PSL includes gTLDs, ccTLDs and paths for cookies. The cookie paths are not needed to determine the 'main' domain, and it might cause an incorrect result.
    – jww
    Apr 9 '14 at 18:54
  • 3
    @SimoneCarletti My original comment was a while ago, but what I meant was that in the last example .co.uk, becomes .com all of a sudden.
    – Mischa
    Apr 12 '14 at 0:22
  • I would rename domain.domain to domain.name Mar 15 '17 at 17:35
67

This should work with pretty much any URL:

# URL always gets parsed twice
def get_host_without_www(url)
  url = "http://#{url}" if URI.parse(url).scheme.nil?
  host = URI.parse(url).host.downcase
  host.start_with?('www.') ? host[4..-1] : host
end

Or:

# Only parses twice if url doesn't start with a scheme
def get_host_without_www(url)
  uri = URI.parse(url)
  uri = URI.parse("http://#{url}") if uri.scheme.nil?
  host = uri.host.downcase
  host.start_with?('www.') ? host[4..-1] : host
end

You may have to require 'uri'.

4
  • 1
    That probably won't work if url is just www.example.com, URI doesn't react well to URIs that don't have schemes. Jul 13 '11 at 5:22
  • 2
    You can get around that by checking u.scheme right after u = URI.parse(url) and then adding a scheme if necessary and reparsing. Jul 13 '11 at 5:33
  • 11
    I think these are getting too complex. This should work: URI('http://www.example.com').host.match(/[^\.]+\.\w+$/).to_s.
    – Chip
    Dec 7 '13 at 18:06
  • 2
    @Chip hey your regex can't check ccTLD If URI('http://www.example.co.kr').host.match(/[^\.]+\.\w+$/).to_s coded, then => "co.kr" is outputted
    – Penguin
    Aug 10 '16 at 2:22
4

Just a short note: to overcome the second parsing of the url from Mischas second example, you could make a string comparison instead of URI.parse.

# Only parses once
def get_host_without_www(url)
  url = "http://#{url}" unless url.start_with?('http')
  uri = URI.parse(url)
  host = uri.host.downcase
  host.start_with?('www.') ? host[4..-1] : host
end

The downside of this approach is, that it is limiting the url to http(s) based urls, which is widely the standard. But if you will use it more general (f.e. for ftp links) you have to adjust accordingly.

4

Addressable is probably the right answer in 2018, especially uses the PublicSuffix gem to parse domains.

However, I need to do this kind of parsing in multiple places, from various data sources, and found it a bit verbose to use repeatedly. So I created a wrapper around it, Adomain:

require 'adomain'

Adomain["https://toolbar.google.com"]
# => "toolbar.google.com"

Adomain["https://www.google.com"]
# => "google.com"

Adomain["stackoverflow.com"]
# => "stackoverflow.com"

I hope this helps others.

1

Here's one that works better with .co.uk and .com.fr - type domains

domain = uri.host[/[^.\s\/]+\.([a-z]{3,}|([a-z]{2}|com)\.[a-z]{2})$/]
1
0

if the URL is in format http://www.google.com, then you could do something like:

a = 'http://www.google.com'
puts a.split(/\./)[1] + '.' + a.split(/\./)[2]

Or

a =~ /http:\/\/www\.(.*?)$/
puts $1
2
  • definitely not - it really depends on your input - are your receiving just an url at a time as input? do the urls have relative paths? do they always come with www as a subdomain? do they always have a subdomain? are they all http urls or you get urls with https, ftp, etc? and there are many more questions that could be asked - this is just to get you started :) Jul 13 '11 at 5:08
  • That wouldn't work for a UK domains co.uk for example Jan 11 '16 at 0:42
-1

Well you can write this method:

require 'URI'
def domain_name(url, arg={:with_dot_principal=>false})
  arg[:with_dot_principal] ? URI(url).hostname.split('.').last(2).join('.') : URI(url).hostname.split('.').last(2).first
end

And using:

domain_name("https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl&safe=active&ssui=on")
# => "google"
domain_name("http://google.com", with_dot_principal: true)
# => "google.com"
2
  • This doesn't work for ccTLDs, e.g. domain_name("https://www.google.co.uk/?gws_rd=ssl&safe=active&ssui=on") #=> "co"
    – Cody
    Dec 21 '21 at 21:34
  • Well you are right, this work only for the specific example on the question, and that is, only a example, on last years I pretend developers should understand and act accordingly. Jan 13 at 15:29

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