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I am currently working on a project that is a spinoff (fork) from a framework I have been working on.

This project is intended to be pretty generic, but now I need to fork the codebase again for a client of mine.

At this moment, I have created a custom branch for my client, but I'd rather have a standalone repository for this.

  • Is is possible to 'fork a fork'?
  • If not, what alternatives do I have?

Outline of the situation:

  • Framework repository (original)
    • Generic application repository (fork)
      • (not yet) Client repository (fork of application)

Note: when trying to 'fork a fork' in Github, you will receive a notification that you have already forked the project:

Image showing a forked project cannot be forked again

  • I don't see why it should not be possible... have you tried it? – Felix Kling Jul 13 '11 at 8:20
  • @Felix ah, perhaps I should have clarified that. It is not possible. Updated post to reflect this. – Aron Rotteveel Jul 13 '11 at 8:21
  • Oh ok ( :( ). Is it important that the project is also known to GitHub as a fork (maybe because of pull requests..)? Otherwise you might be able to clone their "real" repository and add it as GitHub project later... – Felix Kling Jul 13 '11 at 8:23
  • @Felix I thought of that. Could be a possible alternative, yeah. I'd still prefer the entire fork history to be preserved, though. – Aron Rotteveel Jul 13 '11 at 8:24
  • I see... in any way, I suggest to contact GitHub support (if you haven't done so yet). – Felix Kling Jul 13 '11 at 8:26
22

I contacted GitHub support about this 'issue' and they confirmed this is not possible. Also, it is very unlikely that such a feature will be implemented in the future.

  • 6
    We have a solid scenario where this feature is required. In 2015: Is Github still insistent on not supporting this use case? – javadba Aug 18 '15 at 18:20
  • 6
    This is now very possible. You just go to the fork you want to fork and click "fork" like you would always do. This only works if you don't have a different fork of that repository in your account already, though. If you do, you have to delete it. Here's an example: github.com/tmk/tmk_keyboard/network/members – iFreilicht Aug 14 '16 at 11:10
  • 1
    They ought to support having both a fork of the original repo and a fork of a fork, simultaneously. They only need to keep track of the parent repo id for it to work. – Andrew Oct 27 '17 at 21:43
16

This is now very possible. You just go to the fork you want to fork and click "fork" like you would always do. This only works if you don't have a different fork of that repository in your account already, though. If you do, you have to delete it.

Answered in a comment by iFreilicht

Since this is the correct answer now, it is better to highlight it.

  • 7
    This is not a correct answer, since the person doesn't want to delete his original repository someone made a fork of, he/she now wants again to fork with their modifications. – axkibe Feb 16 '17 at 12:41
3

Simple answer: Yes and no.

No, for a single account as you are unable to create two repositories with the same name (and forks always have the same name).

Yes, for multiple accounts. So you could setup an organization for your second fork.

  • @Korakter that seems to be the problem: the original project is personal, the fork is organizational. The third one should be organizational... – Aron Rotteveel Jul 13 '11 at 8:40
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    Don't see a problem: As long as the second and third repo goes into different organizations, it works. – KingCrunch Jul 13 '11 at 8:54
  • That still is the problem though; I'd rather not create another organization account for this, since it is technically still the same organization, and these are paid accounts. – Aron Rotteveel Jul 13 '11 at 11:43
  • 2
    You should use branches then, not forks. – Tekkub Jul 14 '11 at 19:49
  • @Koraktor: "unable to create two repositories with the same name (and forks always have the same name)." Couldn't you rename the repository in Admin > Settings > Repository Name? – XP1 Sep 18 '11 at 17:19
0

Of course it is possible. Unfortunately it must be done on the cmd line. After you create the base fork, create another new repo. Check out the base fork locally, add a remote to the new repo, and push to the new repo.

  • this will not register as a fork with github, but in the "git sense of a 'fork'", it is a fork. – mnagel Jul 25 '13 at 16:46
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    The problem is you won't be able provide a pull-request – Yugal Jindle Apr 24 '14 at 8:45

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