73

how can i set a callback for the error handling if mongoose isn't able to connect to my DB?

i know of

connection.on('open', function () { ... });

but is there something like

connection.on('error', function (err) { ... });

?

  • 5
    For anyone stumbling on this question, connection.on('error', function (err) { ... }); is now implemented in 3.X. – Nepoxx Jan 7 '15 at 21:56
117

When you connect you can pick up the error in the callback:

mongoose.connect('mongodb://localhost/dbname', function(err) {
    if (err) throw err;
});
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    What if I want my server to continue running even if there is an error? Everything I've tried so far throws the error and then terminates the program. – winduptoy Dec 27 '12 at 3:20
  • 2
    @evilcelery All queries in mongoose are buffered, so all of them should be executed as soon as you reconnect to db, which is fine and should not be a cause of unknown state. – pronebird Feb 17 '13 at 12:16
  • 9
    This does not seem to work. I can feed it a bad uri and err always returns undefined. – Morgan Herlocker Apr 2 '13 at 16:49
  • 1
    The error comes from the Mongoose documentation for connect() mongoosejs.com/docs/connections.html, which does not specify a callback is possible. – mikemaccana May 14 '14 at 9:36
  • 2
    This does not work in newer Mongoose versions (3.X). See Asta's answer for a solution that works. – Nepoxx Jan 7 '15 at 21:55
41

there many mongoose callback you can use,

// CONNECTION EVENTS
// When successfully connected
mongoose.connection.on('connected', function () {  
  console.log('Mongoose default connection open to ' + dbURI);
}); 

// If the connection throws an error
mongoose.connection.on('error',function (err) {  
  console.log('Mongoose default connection error: ' + err);
}); 

// When the connection is disconnected
mongoose.connection.on('disconnected', function () {  
  console.log('Mongoose default connection disconnected'); 
});

// If the Node process ends, close the Mongoose connection 
process.on('SIGINT', function() {  
  mongoose.connection.close(function () { 
    console.log('Mongoose default connection disconnected through app termination'); 
    process.exit(0); 
  }); 
}); 

more on: http://theholmesoffice.com/mongoose-connection-best-practice/

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    the on error callback doesn't provide the error anymore. it's just a boolean value saying true. – amitava mozumder Apr 26 '19 at 4:11
21

In case anyone happens upon this, the version of Mongoose I'm running (3.4) works as stated in the question. So the following can return an error.

connection.on('error', function (err) { ... });
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    even this doesn't work! the value of err is just 'true'. with no description of the actual error. – amitava mozumder Apr 26 '19 at 5:16
  • @amitavamozumder check my answer of how to use catch and try/catch methods to handle errors. – valdeci Aug 25 '19 at 22:11
5

As we can see on the mongoose documentation for Error Handling, since the connect() method returns a Promise, the promise catch is the option to use with a mongoose connection.

So, to handle initial connection errors, you should use .catch() or try/catch with async/await.

In this way, we have two options:

Using the .catch() method:

mongoose.connect('mongodb://localhost:27017/test', { useNewUrlParser: true })
.catch(error => console.error(error));

or using try/catch:

try {
    await mongoose.connect('mongodb://localhost:27017/test', { useNewUrlParser: true });
} catch (error) {
    console.error(error);
}

IMHO, I think that using catch is a cleaner way.

| improve this answer | |
  • On a bad connection, I get UnhandledPromiseRejectionWarning: ReferenceError: handleError is not defined – serraosays Sep 4 '19 at 4:34
  • @staypuftman the handleError is a generic method, it not doesn't exist at all. I updated my question to make this clear. – valdeci Sep 4 '19 at 8:33
  • Got it, stupid mistake on my end. It's just a generic catch() - thanks for the clarification – serraosays Sep 4 '19 at 18:34
  • @valdeci thanks, this was mentioned in the official mongoose doc too. Still here i am looking a solution for the same in stack overflow. And i find this one as best so far – Joel Joseph Aug 26 at 5:30
2

Late answer, but if you want to keep the server running you can use this:

mongoose.connect('mongodb://localhost/dbname',function(err) {
    if (err)
        return console.error(err);
});
| improve this answer | |
0
  • Handle (catch) the connect exceptions
  • Handle other connection errors
  • show a message when successfully connected
mongoose.connect(
  "mongodb://..."
).catch((e) => {
  console.log("error connecting to mongoose!");
});
mongoose.connection.on("error", (e) => {
  console.log("mongo connect error!");
});
mongoose.connection.on("connected", () => {
  console.log("connected to mongo");
});
| improve this answer | |

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