100

Is there a pythonic way of splitting a number such as 1234.5678 into two parts (1234, 0.5678) i.e. the integer part and the decimal part?

153

Use math.modf:

import math
x = 1234.5678
math.modf(x) # (0.5678000000000338, 1234.0)
8
  • 2
    Perfect! Works great with negatives too! Thanks – Double AA Jul 13 '11 at 16:04
  • 1
    after apply math.modf(x) how can I handle result values? For example if I assing 1234.0 to a variable, how I can do that? – hakiko Dec 30 '13 at 0:31
  • 3
    dec, int = math.modf(1234.5678) – gbtimmon Jun 23 '14 at 16:34
  • 22
    Don't use int as a variable name, it will override the int function. – Holloway Jul 29 '14 at 11:23
  • 2
    @Trengot - Use int_ if you must have a variable that, when read aloud, is called "int". – ArtOfWarfare Jun 23 '15 at 18:24
63

We can use a not famous built-in function; divmod:

>>> s = 1234.5678
>>> i, d = divmod(s, 1)
>>> i
1234.0
>>> d
0.5678000000000338
3
  • 5
    Gives possibly unintuitive results for negative numbers: divmod(-4.5,1) gives -5.0 and 0.5. Using divmod(-4.5, -1) gives 4.0 and -0.5. – Holloway Jul 29 '14 at 11:26
  • @Holloway it is not unintuitive, it comes from math rules: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floor_and_ceiling_functions :) – Sviatoslav V. Nov 7 '20 at 11:08
  • @SviatoslavV. Those math rules you mentioned specifically state: The integral part or integer part of x, often denoted [ x ] , is floor(x) if x is nonnegative, and ceiling(x) otherwise. – Bhuvanesh Jan 26 at 6:40
48
>>> a = 147.234
>>> a % 1
0.23400000000000887
>>> a // 1
147.0
>>>

If you want the integer part as an integer and not a float, use int(a//1) instead. To obtain the tuple in a single passage: (int(a//1), a%1)

EDIT: Remember that the decimal part of a float number is approximate, so if you want to represent it as a human would do, you need to use the decimal library

3
  • 5
    Slightly confusing results for negative numbers, -2.25 // 1 == -3.0 and -2.25 % 1 == 0.75. This may be what the OP would want, as int part + decimal part is still equal to the original value. By contrast, math.modf(-2.25) == (-0.25, -2.0). – Andrew Clark Jul 13 '11 at 15:57
  • @Andrew - good point! I think @mhyfritz's answer is a better one, anyhow! – mac Jul 13 '11 at 16:02
  • Nice - I reckon this would be the fastest way of those shown here bearing in mind Andrew Clark's caveat for negative numbers – jacanterbury Jan 8 '18 at 18:52
15
intpart,decimalpart = int(value),value-int(value)

Works for positive numbers.

2
  • In [1]: value = 1.89 In [2]: intpart,decimalpart = int(value),value-int(value) In [3]: intpart Out [3]: 1 In [4]: decimalpart Out [4]: 0.8899999999999999 – iMom0 Mar 9 '12 at 4:44
  • 1
    @iMom0 - See docs.oracle.com/cd/E19957-01/806-3568/ncg_goldberg.html and numerous questions on this site regarding floating point accuracy. – Mark Ransom Mar 9 '12 at 4:51
7

This variant allows getting desired precision:

>>> a = 1234.5678
>>> (lambda x, y: (int(x), int(x*y) % y/y))(a, 1e0)
(1234, 0.0)
>>> (lambda x, y: (int(x), int(x*y) % y/y))(a, 1e1)
(1234, 0.5)
>>> (lambda x, y: (int(x), int(x*y) % y/y))(a, 1e15)
(1234, 0.5678)
4

This also works for me

>>> val_int = int(a)
>>> val_fract = a - val_int
1

This is the way I do it:

num = 123.456
split_num = str(num).split('.')
int_part = int(split_num[0])
decimal_part = int(split_num[1])
2
  • 4
    Depending on the use case, this probably won't work for numbers with zero after the decimal place (e.g. 123.0456) – Jon Oct 4 '16 at 8:24
  • You're right: it depends on the use case. If you try it with 123.0456 result is int_part = 123 and decimal_part = 456. In my use cases I found "the zero removal" usefull :) – holydrinker Jan 31 '18 at 8:17
1

I have come up with two statements that can divide positive and negative numbers into integer and fraction without compromising accuracy (bit overflow) and speed.

As an example, a positive or negative value of the value 100.1323 will be divided as:
100.1323 -> (100, 0.1323)
-100.1323 -> (-100, -0.1323)

Code

# Divide a number (x) into integer and fraction
i = int(x) # Get integer
f = (x*1e17 - i*1e17) / 1e17 # Get fraction

Speedtest

The performance test shows that the two statements are faster than math.modf, as long as they are not put into their own function or method.

test.py:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import math
import cProfile

""" Get the performance of both statements and math.modf """

X = -100.1323  # The number to be divided into integer and fraction
LOOPS = range(5 * 10 ** 6)  # Number of loops


def scenario_a():
    """ Get the performance of the statements """
    for _ in LOOPS:
        i = int(X)  # -100
        f = (X*1e17-i*1e17)/1e17  # -0.1323


def scenario_b():
    """ Tests the speed of the statements when integer need to be float.
        NOTE: The only difference between this and math.modf is the accuracy """
    for _ in LOOPS:
        i = int(X)  # -100
        i, f = float(i), (X*1e17-i*1e17)/1e17  # (-100.0, -0.1323)


def scenario_c():
    """ Tests the speed of the statements in a function """
    def modf(x):
        i = int(x)
        return i, (x*1e17-i*1e17)/1e17

    for _ in LOOPS:
        i, f = modf(X)  # (-100, -0.1323)


def scenario_d():
    """ Tests the speed of math.modf """
    for _ in LOOPS:
        f, i = math.modf(X)  # (-0.13230000000000075, -100.0)


def scenario_e():
    """ Tests the speed of math.modf when the integer part should be integer """
    for _ in LOOPS:
        f, i = math.modf(X)  # (-0.13230000000000075, -100.0)
        i = int(i)  # -100


if __name__ == '__main__':
    cProfile.run('scenario_a()')
    cProfile.run('scenario_b()')
    cProfile.run('scenario_c()')
    cProfile.run('scenario_d()')
    cProfile.run('scenario_e()')

Result:

         4 function calls in 1.357 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    1.357    1.357 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    1.357    1.357    1.357    1.357 test.py:11(scenario_a)
        1    0.000    0.000    1.357    1.357 {built-in method builtins.exec}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}


         4 function calls in 1.858 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    1.858    1.858 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    1.858    1.858    1.858    1.858 test.py:18(scenario_b)
        1    0.000    0.000    1.858    1.858 {built-in method builtins.exec}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}


         5000004 function calls in 2.744 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    2.744    2.744 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    1.245    1.245    2.744    2.744 test.py:26(scenario_c)
  5000000    1.499    0.000    1.499    0.000 test.py:29(modf)
        1    0.000    0.000    2.744    2.744 {built-in method builtins.exec}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}


         5000004 function calls in 1.904 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    1.904    1.904 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    1.073    1.073    1.904    1.904 test.py:37(scenario_d)
        1    0.000    0.000    1.904    1.904 {built-in method builtins.exec}
  5000000    0.831    0.000    0.831    0.000 {built-in method math.modf}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}


         5000004 function calls in 2.547 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    2.547    2.547 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    1.696    1.696    2.547    2.547 test.py:43(scenario_e)
        1    0.000    0.000    2.547    2.547 {built-in method builtins.exec}
  5000000    0.851    0.000    0.851    0.000 {built-in method math.modf}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}

Use C/C++ extension

I have tried to compile the two statements with C/C++ support and the result was even better. With Python extension module it was possible to get a method that was faster and more accurate than math.modf.

math2.pyx:

def modf(number):
    cdef float num = <float> number
    cdef int i = <int> num
    return i, (num*1e17 - i*1e17) / 1e17

See Basics of Cython

test.py:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import math
import cProfile
import math2

""" Get the performance of both statements and math.modf """

X = -100.1323  # The number to be divided into integers and fractions
LOOPS = range(5 * 10 ** 6)  # Number of loops


def scenario_a():
    """ Tests the speed of the statements in a function using C/C++ support """
    for _ in LOOPS:
        i, f = math2.modf(X)  # (-100, -0.1323)


def scenario_b():
    """ Tests the speed of math.modf """
    for _ in LOOPS:
        f, i = math.modf(X)  # (-0.13230000000000075, -100.0)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    cProfile.run('scenario_a()')
    cProfile.run('scenario_b()')

Result:

         5000004 function calls in 1.629 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    1.629    1.629 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    1.100    1.100    1.629    1.629 test.py:10(scenario_a)
        1    0.000    0.000    1.629    1.629 {built-in method builtins.exec}
  5000000    0.529    0.000    0.529    0.000 {math2.modf}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}


         5000004 function calls in 1.802 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    1.802    1.802 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    1.010    1.010    1.802    1.802 test.py:16(scenario_b)
        1    0.000    0.000    1.802    1.802 {built-in method builtins.exec}
  5000000    0.791    0.000    0.791    0.000 {built-in method math.modf}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}

NOTE

The statements can be faster with modulo, but modulo can not be used to split negative numbers into integer and fraction parts.

i, f = int(x), x*1e17%1e17/1e17 # Divide a number (x) into integer and fraction

As an example, a positive or negative value of the value 100.1323 will be divided as:
100.1323 -> (100, 0.1323)
-100.1323 -> (-100, 0.8677) <-- Wrong

0

If you don't mind using NumPy, then:

In [319]: real = np.array([1234.5678])

In [327]: integ, deci = int(np.floor(real)), np.asscalar(real % 1)

In [328]: integ, deci
Out[328]: (1234, 0.5678000000000338)

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