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I have a method where I would like to run three queries in parallel. I am trying to use Task Parallel library to do so as shown:

        internal static async Task<RequestAppointmentDBMasterObject> GetDAMasterObject(string facility, string sites, string state)
        {
            
            RequestAppointmentDBMasterObject mo = new RequestAppointmentDBMasterObject();

            string querySites = query1;
            string queryPractitioners = query2;
            string queryExistingAppts = query3;

        using (IDbConnection db = new OdbcConnection(connectionString))
        {
            await Task.Run(() =>
            {
                Parallel.Invoke(
                    () => { mo.SiteList = db.Query<Sites>(querySites).ToList(); },
                    () => { mo.PractitionerList = db.Query<Practitioners>(queryPractitioners).ToList(); },
                    () => { mo.ExistingAppointments = db.Query<AvailResponseObject>(queryExistingAppts).ToList(); }
                );
            });
        }

            return mo;
        }

Then, on another class I am calling this method to set the object I am going to work with as shown below:

        RequestAppointmentDBMasterObject mo = DataAccess.GetDAMasterObject(facility, site, state).Result;

The problem is that I never get a result back when I call the API. Once I change everything back to not use the Task and Parallel libs. everything works fine. I also tried this same code in a Console App and I got data back. I am not sure why I might be missing on the code so I can use this on my API. Thank you in advance.

6
  • This code contains several bugs. Parallel.Invoke doesn't help at all. Dapper has QuerryAsync so there's no reason to call Task.Run to call Query. Worse, Parallel.Invoke` is modifying shared state Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 14:00
  • @PanagiotisKanavos, thanks for your feedback. I just fixed how Parllel.Invoke is getting called. Can you post an example on how to do this with QueryAsync
    – Yoismel
    Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 14:08
  • 1
    It doesn't matter how you call Parallel.Invoke. It's the wrong thing to use in the first place. It's wasting threads and prevents you from using QueryAsync Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 14:12
  • @PanagiotisKanavos, will it be valid to say this will then execute in parallel? mo.SiteList = db.QueryAsync<Sites>(querySites).Result.ToList(); mo.PractitionerList = db.QueryAsync<Practitioners>(queryPractitioners).Result.ToList(); mo.ExistingAppointments = db.QueryAsync<AvailResponseObject>(queryExistingAppts).Result.ToList();
    – Yoismel
    Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 14:26
  • No. .Result blocks. You must use await to await completion without blocking. Richard's answer shows this Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 14:34

2 Answers 2

4

This is massively more complex than needed. Having layers of tasks wrapper others is not generally the right approach.

You would be better performing the three queries as async operations (ie. they return Task<T>, and then awaiting them in parallel:

var t1 = db.QueryAsync(...);
var t2 = db.QueryAsync(...);
var t3 = db.QueryAsync(...);

await Task.WhenAll(t1, t2, t3);

This does depend on the database connection supporting multiple concurrent connections (this is generally not true).

Use t1.Result etc. to get the returned values.

3
  • Thanks for your feedback @Richard. Please note that I updated the question to show how I am using Parallel.Invoke. Can you post an example of what you mean
    – Yoismel
    Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 14:10
  • Just applied this and worked. Already seeing better performance. Thanks a lot for your feedback.
    – Yoismel
    Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 14:48
  • 1
    @TheodorZoulias oops, forgot to fix that. Was thinking of other Parallel methods.
    – Richard
    Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 16:52
4

As noted in the comments, you don't want to use Parallel at all. Instead, use asynchronous concurrency (await Task.WhenAll).

However, most database providers do not allow multiple simultaneous requests over the same database connection. So you will probably need to have three different db connections to run three queries concurrently.

internal static async Task<RequestAppointmentDBMasterObject> GetDAMasterObject(string facility, string sites, string state)
{
  RequestAppointmentDBMasterObject mo = new RequestAppointmentDBMasterObject();
  string querySites = query1;
  string queryPractitioners = query2;
  string queryExistingAppts = query3;

  using (IDbConnection db1 = new OdbcConnection(connectionString))
  using (IDbConnection db2 = new OdbcConnection(connectionString))
  using (IDbConnection db3 = new OdbcConnection(connectionString))
  {
    var task1 = db1.Query<Sites>(querySites).ToListAsync();
    var task2 = db2.Query<Practitioners>(queryPractitioners).ToListAsync();
    var task3 = db3.Query<AvailResponseObject>(queryExistingAppts).ToListAsync();
    await Task.WhenAll(task1, task2, task3);
    mo.SiteList = await task1;
    mo.PractitionerList = await task2;
    mo.ExistingAppointments = await task3;
  }
  return mo;
}

Doing multiple concurrent queries like this is possible, but it's usually better to do a single query that gets everything back all at once. That way you only need a single db connection, and all the query results are consistent with each other.

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  • thanks for your feedback. This clarifies a question I had "most database providers do not allow multiple simultaneous requests". I like the approach you are showing.
    – Yoismel
    Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 14:34
  • Seems this database supports concurrent connections since Richard's suggestion worked. I will have this in mind for future reference. Thanks Stephen.
    – Yoismel
    Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 14:50
  • Is there a reason to do await Task.WhenAll(task1, task2, task3) followed by three lines awaiting each task again? Commented Mar 28, 2021 at 21:23
  • @Enigmativity: Just preference. I prefer a single await Task.WhenAll to make the code as clear as possible. Commented Mar 28, 2021 at 21:41
  • Fair enough. I had wondered if it were a personal coding preference. It is very clear. Commented Mar 28, 2021 at 21:57

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