14

Take a look at the following code

#include <type_traits>

template <typename T>
struct basic_type {
  using type = T;
};

consteval auto foo(auto p, auto x) noexcept {
  if constexpr (p(x)) {
    return 1;
  } else {
    return 0;
  }
}

int main() {
    // This compiles
    return foo(
        []<typename T>(basic_type<T>) 
        { 
            return std::is_integral_v<T>; 
        }, 
        basic_type<int>{});

    // This gives "x is not a constant expression"
    /*return foo(
        []<typename T>(T) 
        { 
            return std::is_integral_v<std::decay_t<T>>; 
        }, 
        0);*/
}

The first return statement compiles just fine on latest gcc trunk, while the second one does not compile, with the error message:

source>: In instantiation of 'consteval auto foo(auto:1, auto:2) [with auto:1 = main()::<lambda(T)>; auto:2 = int]':
<source>:26:12:   required from here
<source>:9:3: error: 'x' is not a constant expression
    9 |   if constexpr (p(x)) {
      |   ^~
<source>: In function 'int main()':
<source>:26:19: error: 'consteval auto foo(auto:1, auto:2) [with auto:1 = main()::<lambda(T)>; auto:2 = int]' called in a constant expression
   26 |         return foo(
      |                ~~~^
   27 |                 []<typename T>(T)
      |                 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   28 |                 {
      |                 ~  
   29 |                         return std::is_integral_v<std::decay_t<T>>;
      |                         ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   30 |                 },
      |                 ~~ 
   31 |                 0);
      |                 ~~ 
<source>:8:16: note: 'consteval auto foo(auto:1, auto:2) [with auto:1 = main()::<lambda(T)>; auto:2 = int]' is not usable as a 'constexpr' function because:
    8 | consteval auto foo(auto p, auto x) noexcept {
      |                ^~~

Can anyone tell me why?

Here's a godbolt link https://godbolt.org/z/71rbWob4e

EDIT

As requested, here's foo without auto parameters:

template<typename Predicate, typename T>
consteval auto foo(Predicate p, T x) noexcept {
  if constexpr (p(x)) {
    return 1;
  } else {
    return 0;
  }
}

Error Message looks like this:


<source>: In instantiation of 'consteval auto foo(Predicate, T) [with Predicate = main()::<lambda(T)>; T = int]':
<source>:27:15:   required from here
<source>:10:3: error: 'x' is not a constant expression
   10 |   if constexpr (p(x)) {
      |   ^~
<source>: In function 'int main()':
<source>:27:15: error: 'consteval auto foo(Predicate, T) [with Predicate = main()::<lambda(T)>; T = int]' called in a constant expression
   27 |     return foo(
      |            ~~~^
   28 |         []<typename T>(T)
      |         ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   29 |         {
      |         ~      
   30 |             return std::is_integral_v<std::decay_t<T>>;
      |             ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   31 |         },
      |         ~~     
   32 |         0);
      |         ~~     
<source>:9:16: note: 'consteval auto foo(Predicate, T) [with Predicate = main()::<lambda(T)>; T = int]' is not usable as a 'constexpr' function because:
    9 | consteval auto foo(Predicate p, T x) noexcept {
      | 
8
  • fwiw, the difference seems to be 0 vs basic_type<int>{} not std::decay_t<T> vs T (godbolt.org/z/5Mfe14MxW) – largest_prime_is_463035818 Mar 30 at 11:08
  • Given that all compilers (gcc, clang, msvc) have the same result and somewhat weird rules w.r.t. if constexpr I'm inclined to believe that the error is correct (but not 100% sure). Can you try to rewrite your foo replacing auto parameters with actual template arguments? Likely it'd make it clearer. – Dan M. Mar 30 at 11:18
  • I added the function without auto parameters @DanM. – Yamahari Mar 30 at 12:10
  • consteval and constexpr function can have non-compile-time arguments. It means that compiler makes most general assumptions when compiling this function. And this assumption is that arguments are non-compile-time. It means that compiler can't guarantee that your if-constexpr is always compile-time, hence the error about it. If you place all your arguments as template auto parameters of your function then it should compile well. – Arty Mar 30 at 12:31
  • but it does not actually depend on the value you pass in, only the type of the value, which is always known at compile-time? – Yamahari Mar 30 at 12:38
19

In order to evaluate this:

  if constexpr (p(x)) {

We need for p(x) to be a constant expression. The rules for whether something qualifies as a constant expression or not are based on a list of things that you're not allowed to do.

When x is a basic_type<int> and p is a function that takes a basic_type<int> by value, there are simply no rules that we are violating. This is an empty type, so copying it (as we're doing here) doesn't actually involve any kind of read. This just works.


But when x is an int and p is a function that takes an int by value, this also requires copying x but this time it involves reading the value of x. Because, of course, gotta initialize the parameter somehow. And this does run afoul of a rule: [expr.const]/8 says we're not allowed to perform:

an lvalue-to-rvalue conversion unless it is applied to

  • a non-volatile glvalue that refers to an object that is usable in constant expressions, or
  • a non-volatile glvalue of literal type that refers to a non-volatile object whose lifetime began within the evaluation of E;

An lvalue-to-rvalue conversion is what happens when we read the value of a variable, and neither of those bullets apply. It doesn't matter here that you don't actually care what the value is, since p doesn't use it. In order to be able to even invoke p, you have to copy x, and you're not allowed to do that. Hence the error.


However, your lambda here doesn't actually need the value, just the type, so you could instead write this:

    return foo(
        []<typename T>(T const&) 
        { 
            return std::is_integral_v<std::decay_t<T>>; 
        }, 
        0);

Now we're no longer copying x into the lambda, since the lambda no longer takes by value - it takes by reference. As a result, we're not violating the lvalue-to-rvalue conversion rule (or any other rule) and this is now a valid constant expression.


Then, as a bonus, if you change foo to take x by reference (because, again, you don't actually care about the value, so why not):

consteval auto foo(auto p, auto const& x) noexcept {
  if constexpr (p(x)) {
    return 1;
  } else {
    return 0;
  }
}

Then both variants become ill-formed. Both the basic_type<int> and int versions (regardless of whether you take the int by value or by reference). For more on this case, see the constexpr array size problem which I'm currently trying to resolve with P2280.

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