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I want to know Guard Sequence And What Are The Valid Guard Expressions in Erlang?

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    Welcome to Stack Overflow. The questions seems a bit too broad. What does the documentation say? Where are you having problems? – n-smits Apr 1 at 1:26
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Guard Sequences

A guard sequence is a sequence of guards, separated by semicolon (;). The guard sequence is true if at least one of the guards is true. (The remaining guards, if any, are not evaluated.)

Guard1;...;GuardK

Example:

go(X,Y) when X==1;Y==2 ->
   io:format("Yes~n").

In the shell:

2> a:go(1, 2).
Yes
ok
3> a:go(1, 3).
Yes
ok
4> a:go(4, 2).
Yes
ok
5> a:go(4, 3).
** exception error: no function clause matching 
                a:go(4,3) (a.erl, line 4)

So, a semi-colon is like OR.

A guard is a sequence of guard expressions, separated by comma (,). The guard is true if all guard expressions evaluate to true.

GuardExpr1,...,GuardExprN

Example:

go(X,Y,Z) when X==1,Y==2, is_atom(Z) ->
    io:format("Yes~n").

In the shell:

8> a:go(1, 3, a).
** exception error: no function clause matching 
                    a:go(1,3,a) (a.erl, line 4)
9> a:go(1, 2, a).
Yes
ok

So, a comma is like AND.

Guard Expressions

The set of valid guard expressions is a subset of the set of valid Erlang expressions. The reason for restricting the set of valid expressions is that evaluation of a guard expression must be guaranteed to be free of side effects. Valid guard expressions are the following:

Variables
Constants (atoms, integer, floats, lists, tuples, records, binaries, and maps)
Expressions that construct atoms, integer, floats, lists, tuples, records, binaries, and maps
Expressions that update a map
The record epxressions Expr#Name.Field and #Name.Field
Calls to the BIFs specified in tables Type Test BIFs and Other BIFs Allowed in Guard Expressions
Term comparisons
Arithmetic expressions
Boolean expressions
Short-circuit expressions (andalso/orelse)

Type Test BIFs:

    is_atom/1
    is_binary/1
    is_bitstring/1
    is_boolean/1
    is_float/1
    is_function/1
    is_function/2
    is_integer/1
    is_list/1
    is_map/1
    is_number/1
    is_pid/1
    is_port/1
    is_record/2
    is_record/3
    is_reference/1
    is_tuple/1

Notice that most type test BIFs have older equivalents, without the is_ prefix. These old BIFs are retained for backwards compatibility only and are not to be used in new code. They are also only allowed at top level. For example, they are not allowed in Boolean expressions in guards.

Other BIFs Allowed in Guard Expressions:

abs(Number)
bit_size(Bitstring)
byte_size(Bitstring)
element(N, Tuple)
float(Term)
hd(List)
length(List)
map_get(Key, Map)
map_size(Map)
node()
node(Pid|Ref|Port)
round(Number)
self()
size(Tuple|Bitstring)
tl(List)
trunc(Number)
tuple_size(Tuple)

If an arithmetic expression, a Boolean expression, a short-circuit expression, or a call to a guard BIF fails (because of invalid arguments), the entire guard fails. If the guard was part of a guard sequence, the next guard in the sequence (that is, the guard following the next semicolon) is evaluated.

This:

A guard sequence is a sequence of guards, separated by semicolon (;).

gives you this:

GuardSequence = Guard1;Guard2;Guard3

What is a Guard? This sentence:

A guard is a sequence of guard expressions, separated by comma (,).

gives you this:

Guard1 = GuardExpr1, GuardExpr2, GuardExpr3

What's a guard expression? This sentence:

The set of valid guard expressions is...

gives you stuff like:

GuardExpr1 = (X==1)
GuardExpr2 = (Y==2)
GuardExpr3  = is_atom(Z)

Now, substitute the GuardExpr's into this line:

 Guard1 = GuardExpr1, GuardExpr2, GuardExpr3

giving you:

 Guard1 =   X==1, Y==2, is_atom(Z)

Now, substitute Guard1 into this line:

 GuardSequence = Guard1;Guard2;Guard3

giving you:

 GuardSequence = X==1, Y==2, is_atom(Z)

If you also have a Guard2 and Guard3, and they look like this:

 Guard2 =  is_integer(X)
 Guard3 =  element(Y, Tuple)

then GuardSequence would look like this:

GuardSequence = X==1, Y==2, is_atom(Z); is_integer(X); element(Y, Tuple)

OKAY??!

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