15

Considering this well-known C++ pattern :

template <class... Ts> struct overload : Ts... { using Ts::operator()...; };
template <class... Ts> overload(Ts...) -> overload<Ts...>; // clang needs this deduction guide,
                                                           // even in C++20 for some reasons ...

I wonder why declaring one of the parameter as a mutable lambda changes the override resolution.

Live example here on godbolt :

#include <iostream>

template <class... Ts> struct overload : Ts... { using Ts::operator()...; };
template <class... Ts> overload(Ts...) -> overload<Ts...>; // clang needs this deduction guide,
                                                           // even in C++20 for some reasons ...

auto main() -> int
{
    auto functor_1 = overload{
        [](int &&){
            std::cout << "int\n";
        },
        [](auto &&) {   // making this lambda `mutable` makes deduction mismatch ?
            std::cout << "smthg else\n";
        }
    };
    functor_1(42); // prints `int`

    auto functor_2 = overload{
        [](int &&){
            std::cout << "int\n";
        },
        [](auto &&) mutable {
            std::cout << "smthg else\n";
        }
    };
    functor_2(42); // prints `smth else`
}
4
  • 1
    Even though this pattern is well-known, I think it'd be beneficial to include a deduction guide (template <class... Ts> overload(Ts&& ...) -> overload<Ts...>;), because without it your code does not compile. – Fureeish Mar 31 at 15:08
  • I guess the void operator()(int&&) const is a worse match than template<class T> void operator(T&&) because the first one is const? – user253751 Mar 31 at 15:08
  • @Fureeish In fact, only Clang needs the user-defined deduction guide I added to the original question. This is one of the feature of C++20, in opposition to C++17 – Guss Mar 31 at 15:14
  • Interesting, do you have the name of the paper that proposed that change? – Fureeish Mar 31 at 15:42
9

With

auto functor = overload{
    [](int &&){
        std::cout << "int\n";
    },
    [](auto &&) {
        std::cout << "smthg else\n";
    }
};
functor(42); // prints `int`

both closures have const qualified operator()'s so int&& is a better match as it is not a template.

With

auto functor = overload{
    [](int &&){
        std::cout << "int\n";
    },
    [](auto &&) mutable {
        std::cout << "smthg else\n";
    }
};
functor(42); // prints `smthg else`

Your auto&& closure is not const qualified anymore, meaning there is no const qualification adjustment that needs to happen in order to call it. This makes that overload an identity exact match, while the int&& overload needs a const qualification adjustment. The identity exact match beats out a const qualification adjustment exact match per [tab:over.ics.scs] so that is why you see the auto&& version called.

5
  • Thanks, you're right. Did not notice the const conversion – Guss Mar 31 at 15:18
  • @Guss No problem. It's bitten me few times so I understand where you're coming from. – NathanOliver Mar 31 at 15:20
  • 1
    @Guss fwiw, what you observe is consistent with "normal" overload resolution of methods: godbolt.org/z/4GKhGKevW – largest_prime_is_463035818 Mar 31 at 15:23
  • @largest_prime_is_463035818 Yes definitly. Thanks for pinpointing this, I totaly forgot that symbol cv qualifier was stronger than argument implicit conversion when deducing the symbol godbolt.org/z/Mn7qxnsjY – Guss Mar 31 at 15:27
  • @Guss really no need to make excuses :) I found that out only by experimenting and I wouldnt be able to explain you why without reading this answer – largest_prime_is_463035818 Mar 31 at 15:30

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