I have a handler attached to an event and I would like it to execute only if it is triggered by a human, and not by a trigger() method. How do I tell the difference?

For example,

$('.checkbox').change(function(e){
  if (e.isHuman())
  {
    alert ('human');
  }
});

$('.checkbox').trigger('change'); //doesn't alert
  • 6
    It took me a while to figure out how to google this question. – minexew Mar 13 '15 at 15:45
  • @minexew Hardest part of using programming is naming variables and how to google problems! :P – Ilyas karim Dec 29 '17 at 11:00
up vote 186 down vote accepted

You can check e.originalEvent: if it's defined the click is human:

Look at the fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/Uf8Wv/

$('.checkbox').change(function(e){
  if (e.originalEvent !== undefined)
  {
    alert ('human');
  }
});

my example in the fiddle:

<input type='checkbox' id='try' >try
<button id='click'>Click</button>

$("#try").click(function(event) {
    if (event.originalEvent === undefined) {
        alert('not human')
    } else {
        alert(' human');
    }


});

$('#click').click(function(event) {
    $("#try").click();
});
  • 1
    @Nicola Is this documented anywhere? – Šime Vidas Jul 14 '11 at 11:15
  • @Sime i don't know, but i think it's standard. look here:api.jquery.com/category/events/event-object – Nicola Peluchetti Jul 14 '11 at 11:28
  • @Nicola I see, it's a jQuery thing. jQuery stores the original event object inside this property. Btw, what do you mean you don't know? You just provided the link to the documentation :) – Šime Vidas Jul 14 '11 at 11:41
  • 1
    Looks like you can also use event.isTrigger – avoliva May 28 '15 at 18:33
  • 1
    @Anurag, I was running into the same issue just now. It looks like jQuery populates originalEvent when the event is triggered by DOM.click(), but you can use $($("#try")[0]).click();, which is clunky, but works. – Daniel Garrett Aug 11 '16 at 16:06

More straight forward than above would be:

$('.checkbox').change(function(e){
  if (e.isTrigger)
  {
    alert ('not a human');
  }
});

$('.checkbox').trigger('change'); //doesn't alert

I think that the only way to do this would be to pass in an additional parameter on the trigger call as per the documentation.

$('.checkbox').change(function(e, isTriggered){
  if (!isTriggered)
  {
    alert ('human');
  }
});

$('.checkbox').trigger('change', [true]); //doesn't alert

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/wG2KY/

Accepted answer didn't work for me. It's been 6 years and jQuery has changed a lot since then.

For example event.originalEvent returns always true with jQuery 1.9.x. I mean object always exists but content is different.

Those who use newer versions of jQuery can try this one. Works on Chrome, Edge, IE, Opera, FF

if ((event.originalEvent.isTrusted === true && event.originalEvent.isPrimary === undefined) || event.originalEvent.isPrimary === true) {
    //Hey hooman it is you
}

You can use onmousedown to detect mouse click vs trigger() call.

  • I may not work on the following scenario : Sometimes is possible to select page's elements using the Tab key. For example, if I have selected in this way a checkbox, I can check/uncheck using the space key . Or even open a drodpdown using the down arrow key . – Diego Favero Nov 22 '17 at 13:18

I would think about a possibility where you check the mouse position, like:

  • Click
  • Get mouse position
  • Overlaps the coords of the button
  • ...
  • I may not work on the following scenario : Sometimes is possible to select page's elements using the Tab key. For example, if I have selected in this way a checkbox, I can check/uncheck using the space key . Or even open a drodpdown using the down arrow key . – Diego Favero Nov 22 '17 at 13:18

Incase you have control of all your code, no alien calls $(input).focus() than setFocus().

Use a global variable is a correct way for me.

var globalIsHuman = true;

$('input').on('focus', function (){
    if(globalIsHuman){
        console.log('hello human, come and give me a hug');
    }else{
        console.log('alien, get away, i hate you..');
    }
    globalIsHuman = true;
});

// alien set focus
function setFocus(){
    globalIsHuman = false;
    $('input').focus();
}
// human use mouse, finger, foot... whatever to touch the input

If some alien still want to call $(input).focus() from another planet. Good luck or check other answers

  • This only prevents people from calling setFocus() - it doesn't prevent people from triggering the focus event. Not writing setFocus() at all would also prevent people from calling it, so I don't see the benefit. In fact, people could still call $('input').focus() and have it pass. – Rob Jul 27 '17 at 5:38
  • wow, first time i have someone comment right after i answered the question, I will update the answer – vanduc1102 Jul 27 '17 at 5:41

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