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Consider this toy example of "fighting" two random "players":

#[derive(Clone)]
struct Player {
    name: String,
    health: i32,
    attack: i32,
}

fn fight(player_a: &mut Player, player_b: &mut Player) {
    player_a.health -= player_b.attack;
    player_b.health -= player_a.attack;
}

fn main() {
    // Create Vector of 100 new players
    let players: Vec<Player> = vec![
        Player {
            name: String::new(),
            health: 100,
            attack: 5,
        };
        100
    ];

    // Pick two "random" indices
    let i1 = 19;
    let i2 = 30;

    fight(&mut players[i1], &mut players[i2]); // Error!
}

This code will not work as the fight function takes two mutable references to elements of the same players vector.

My ugly workaround currently looks like the following, using RefCell:

use std::cell::RefCell;

let mut players: Vec<RefCell<Player>> = vec![];
for _ in 0..100 {
    players.push(RefCell::new(Player {
        name: String::new(),
        health: 100,
        attack: 5,
    }));
}

fight(&mut players[i1].borrow_mut(), &mut players[i2].borrow_mut());

I'd like to know if there's a more efficient way of doing this to avoid the extra overhead of RefCell? Can I leverage split_at_mut somehow?

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2 Answers 2

4

It’s possible to use split_at_mut to borrow both exclusively:

#[derive(Clone)]
struct Player {
    name: String,
    health: i32,
    attack: i32,
}

fn fight(player_a: &mut Player, player_b: &mut Player) {
    player_a.health -= player_b.attack;
    player_b.health -= player_a.attack;
}

fn get2<T>(arr: &mut [T], a: usize, b: usize) -> (&mut T, &mut T) {
    use std::cmp::Ordering;

    let (sw, a, b) = match Ord::cmp(&a, &b) {
        Ordering::Less => (false, a, b),
        Ordering::Greater => (true, b, a),
        Ordering::Equal =>
            panic!("attempted to exclusive-borrow one element twice"),
    };
    
    let (arr0, arr1) = arr.split_at_mut(a + 1);
    let (ea, eb) = (&mut arr0[a], &mut arr1[b - (a + 1)]);

    if sw {
        (eb, ea)
    } else {
        (ea, eb)
    }
}

fn main() {
    // Create Vector of 100 new players
    let mut players: Vec<Player> = vec![
        Player {
            name: String::new(),
            health: 100,
            attack: 5,
        };
        100
    ];

    // Pick two "random" indices
    let i1 = 19;
    let i2 = 30;
    
    let (p1, p2) = get2(&mut players, i1, i2);

    println!("{} ({} HP) vs {} ({} HP)",
        p1.attack, p1.health, p2.attack, p2.health);
    fight(p1, p2);
    println!("{} ({} HP) vs {} ({} HP)",
        p1.attack, p1.health, p2.attack, p2.health);
}
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2

You can change fight method like next:

#[derive(Clone)]
struct Player {
    name: String,
    health: i32,
    attack: i32,
}

fn fight(players: &mut [Player], player1_index: usize, player2_index: usize) {
    players[player1_index].health -= players[player2_index].attack;
    players[player2_index].health -= players[player1_index].attack;
}

fn main() {
    // Create Vector of 100 new players
    let mut players: Vec<Player> = vec![
        Player {
            name: String::new(),
            health: 100,
            attack: 5,
        };
        100
    ];

    // Pick two "random" indices
    let i1 = 19;
    let i2 = 30;

    fight(&mut players, i1, i2);
}

Or you can try to workaround this issue with Option:

#[derive(Clone)]
struct Player {
    name: String,
    health: i32,
    attack: i32,
}

fn fight(player_a: &mut Player, player_b: &mut Player) {
    player_a.health -= player_b.attack;
    player_b.health -= player_a.attack;
}

fn main() {
    // Create Vector of 100 new players
    let mut players: Vec<Option<Player>> = vec![
        Some(Player {
            name: String::new(),
            health: 100,
            attack: 5,
        });
        100
    ];

    // Pick two "random" indices
    let i1 = 19;
    let i2 = 30;

    let mut player1 = players[i1].take().unwrap();
    let mut player2 = players[i2].take().unwrap();
    fight(&mut player1, &mut player2);
    players[i1].replace(player1);
    players[i2].replace(player2);
}

Or if you really need 100% performance, you can try to dig deeper into unsafe raw pointers. But you should think twice.

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  • I've done some benchmarking and all 3 proposed solutions so far are around twice as fast as the original RefCell workaround. Your first suggestion of modifying the fight function is the fastest and the simplest, and looks like the way to go. Thanks!
    – t_d_milan
    Commented Apr 5, 2021 at 13:18

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