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data.table has the elegant setattr for in-place addition of a single attribute to a column. Is there an elegant way to overlay multiple attributes in one step? For example, suppose that a data.table has many columns and I want to assign two attributes to column x1 and three attributes to column x3 as might be specified in the following list:

a <- list(x1=list(label='X1', units='mm'),
          x3=list(label='X3', comment='collected remotely', format='type 3'))

I could easily write code that processes a and calls setattr 5 times to accomplish this. But I'm hoping there is a better way.

2 Answers 2

2

I don't know if the following code is very elegant but it works. It's a double *apply loop.
Quoting the question:

I could easily write code that processes a and calls setattr 5 times to accomplish this. But I'm hoping there is a better way.

The problem is that the name in setattr must be a length 1 character string, so setattr will always have to be called 5 times. In the code below this is done in disguise of a double loop.

The example data.table comes from the 3rd DT in help("setattr").

library(data.table)

DT <- data.table(x1 = 1:3, y = 4:6, x3 = 7:9)
a <- list(x1=list(label='X1', units='mm'),
          x3=list(label='X3', comment='collected remotely', format='type 3'))

mapply(function(x, a){
  lapply(names(a), function(na) setattr(DT[[x]], na, a[[na]]))
}, names(a), a)

attributes(DT$x1)
#$label
#[1] "X1"
#
#$units
#[1] "mm"

attributes(DT$x3)
#$label
#[1] "X3"
#
#$comment
#[1] "collected remotely"
#
#$format
#[1] "type 3"

Note. In order to avoid the ugly output from the loops, wrap them in invisible:

invisible(
  mapply(function(x, a){
    lapply(names(a), function(na) setattr(DT[[x]], na, a[[na]]))
  }, names(a), a)
)

Edit

The following code is simpler.

lapply(names(a), function(x){
  lapply(names(a[[x]]), function(y) setattr(DT[[x]], y, a[[x]][[y]]))
})
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  • 1
    If you or anyone else wants an additional challenge: If one of the attributes is "class" and there is an existing class for a column, we would want to do class(x) <- unique(c(class(x), newclass)) Apr 5, 2021 at 21:43
2

This may deviate too much from you desired output, but just to throw out an idea: because setattr accepts a data.table, an alternative may be to set attributes at the data.table level, as a named list pointing to the individual columns:

setattr(d, "all_attr", a)
str(d)
# Classes ‘data.table’ and 'data.frame':    3 obs. of  3 variables:
# $ x1: int  1 2 3
# $ y : int  4 5 6
# $ x3: int  7 8 9
# - attr(*, ".internal.selfref")=<externalptr> 
#   - attr(*, "all_attr")=List of 2
# ..$ x1:List of 2
# .. ..$ label: chr "X1"
# .. ..$ units: chr "mm"
# ..$ x3:List of 3
# .. ..$ label  : chr "X3"
# .. ..$ comment: chr "collected remotely"
# .. ..$ format : chr "type 3"

If you want the attributes set at the level of individual columns, and if you can live with attributes as a nested list, I think it may be enough to loop over the columns.

lapply(names(a), function(x) setattr(d[[x]], x, a[[x]]))
str(d)
# Classes ‘data.table’ and 'data.frame':    3 obs. of  3 variables:
# $ x1: int  1 2 3
# ..- attr(*, "x1")=List of 2
# .. ..$ label: chr "X1"
# .. ..$ units: chr "mm"
# $ y : int  4 5 6
# $ x3: int  7 8 9
# ..- attr(*, "x3")=List of 3
# .. ..$ label  : chr "X3"
# .. ..$ comment: chr "collected remotely"
# .. ..$ format : chr "type 3"
# - attr(*, ".internal.selfref")=<externalptr>

library(data.table)
d = data.table(x1 = 1:3, y = 4:6, x3 = 7:9)
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  • With all the effort I've put in to the Hmisc package to deal with variable labels and units, I've sometimes thought that separating such subset-invariant attributes as you have done may be a better idea. Good food for thought. Apr 6, 2021 at 11:21
  • Thank you for your feedback Frank! Perhaps you could specify/elaborate your requirements in your question as well, e.g. using the toy data from the answers? Cheers
    – Henrik
    Apr 6, 2021 at 11:42
  • This is a much different issue but there are occasions where attributes may best be kept as separate objects and not even placed as an "external" data.table attribute. For example, I've sometimes thought that variable labels should be variable name-specific within one entire analysis script, no matter which data table a variable is coming from. I would then define an object like a above and have various graphics and table making functions look for label and units in a to form axis labels and table row or column headings. Apr 6, 2021 at 12:10

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