-1

So i have written the following method in a class:

Array & operator = (const Array &a) {
  /*delete [] array;
    priv_size = a.priv_size;                        HOW DOES THIS EVEN DO SOMETHING???
    priv_base = a.priv_base;
    array = new int[priv_size*priv_size];

    for (int i=0; i<priv_size*priv_size; i++)
        array[i] = a.array[i];

    return *this;
*/
}

as you can clearly see it is all in one big comment. However, when i call the = operator in main like this:

  cout << a; //there is an operator << too
  cout << endl;
  Array b = a;
  b[1][1] = 39;
  b[3][1] = 2;
  cout << b;
  cout << endl;
  cout << a;

where a is the following array:

   0   0   0   0
   0   0   0   0
   3   0   0   0
   0   0   0   5

this happens:

   0   0   0   0
   0   0   0   0
   3   0   0   0
   0   0   0   5

   0   0   0   0
   0  39   0   0
   3   0   0   0
   0   2   0   5

   0   0   0   0
   0   0   0   0
   3   0   0   0
   0   0   0   5

As you can see i also change some values in b, but a remains intact which means b is not by mistake somehow connected to a in any way.

What is going on here? Help.

Thanks.

EDIT: I moved the comment so that it covers the whole method including the Array & operator = (const Array &a) part. The exact same thing happens(????). How is this possible? It almost seems like there is already a default operator = method, which does't really make too much sense, because why would c++ prioritize such a method, and even if it does, why set it so that it copies a whole array?.

Also, here is the constructor, since a lot of people needed to see it:

Array (int s = 0, int b = 0) :
    array(new int[s*s]), priv_size(s), priv_base(b) {
    for (int i=0; i<priv_size*priv_size; i++)
        array[i] = 0;                                //sets everything to 0
}
6
  • 15
    Array b = a; is not assignment - it's copy initialisation - we need to see the constructor. Please post a minimal reproducible example. See en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/copy_initialization case (1). Apr 5, 2021 at 20:29
  • 3
    you can clearly see it is all in one big comment. Would create undefined behavior if operator=() was used. however its not.
    – drescherjm
    Apr 5, 2021 at 20:41
  • 1
    If you uncomment the code, you should also check for self assignment. a = a; would also lead to UB since you delete[] array; and create a new uninitialized array that you read from (and you'd loose the data too).
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Apr 5, 2021 at 20:46
  • 1
    Rather than array = new int[priv_size*priv_size]; where int* array; is a member variable, switch to std::vector and do array = a.array; where std::vector<int> array; is the member variable. It'll fix several bugs in the program.
    – Eljay
    Apr 5, 2021 at 20:52
  • 2
    As I said in my 1st comment this is not assignment. So the assignment operator is not needed. Apr 6, 2021 at 9:05

1 Answer 1

1

My question is answered:

In my example i wrote Array b = a;, which in c++ calls the copy constructor and not the opperator =

This is documented here:

https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/copy_initialization

As well as here:

https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/copy_constructor

Thanks to everyone who took the time to read the question and comment.

1
  • @Ted Lyngmo thanks for pointing this out!
    – 808kalli
    Apr 7, 2021 at 22:25

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