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In python, there are 3 main types awaitable objects: coroutines, Tasks, and Futures.

I can await a coroutine, and also a tasks.

Awaiting a coroutine

import asyncio

async def nested():
    return 42

async def main():
    print(await nested())  # will print "42".

asyncio.run(main())

Awaiting a task

import asyncio

async def nested():
    return 42

async def main():
    task = asyncio.create_task(nested())
    await task

asyncio.run(main())

What is the value of wrapping the coroutine in a task in the first place? It looks like they do the same thing.

When would I need to use a task vs a coroutine?

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    Can you clarify your question? There are way more awaitable types than the three listed. A coroutine and task are different types - as with any other two types, you pick one over the other when you need its specific features. – MisterMiyagi Apr 8 at 10:48
  • Thanks for the comment, I edited for clarity, let me know if that helps. – Patrick Collins Apr 8 at 10:51
7

Coroutine is just a function that runs in the context of current awaitable. It can yield execution to the event loop on behalf of the caller (the one who calls await). Think of a function that is allowed to pause it's thread. You can call one coroutine from another, but they still share the same thread.

Task, on other hand, immediately posts a separate job to an event loop. The task itself is a handle to that job. You may await a task, but it can run on itself just fine in "parallel" — in single threaded context this means that task can run while other josb are yielding (e.g. waiting for the I/O). Task may complete even before you call await.

Example without tasks:

job_1 = sleep(5)
job_2 = sleep(2)

# will sleep for 5 seconds
await job_1

# will sleep for another 2 seconds
await job_2

Example with tasks:

job_1 = sleep(5)
job_2 = asyncio.create_task(sleep(2))

# will sleep for 5 seconds
await job_1

# by this time, job_2 is complete
# because previous job has yielded at some point, allowing other jobs to run
# thus await takes no time
await job_2
3

In this case there's no real difference: by awaiting the coroutine it's going to get scheduled as part of the task it's part of. However that means it's driven by its parent.

By wrapping a coroutine in a task, it gets independently scheduled on the event loop, meaning it is not driven by the containing task anymore (it has its own lifecycle) and it can be interacted with more richly (e.g. cancelled or have callbacks added to it).

Think "function" versus "thread", really. A coroutine is just a function which can be suspended (if it awaits stuff), but it still only exists within the lexical and dynamic context of its caller. A task is freed from that context, it makes the wrapped coroutine live its own life in the same way a thread makes the wrapped function (target) live its own life.

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  • Oooooo. So that's why I'm getting errors by not awaiting my tasks when I add them to a list? When I try to add corotines to a list, that also errors, but I assumed you can't "do" that. – Patrick Collins Apr 8 at 11:01
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    Without the code I can't tell you because I don't know what you mean. You certainly can't await a list, even if it's a list of tasks (or coroutines), you need to use something like gather or wait in order to "multiplex" the inner awaitable objects into a single top-level awaitable. – Masklinn Apr 8 at 11:05
  • Can you gather a list of coroutines? – Patrick Collins Apr 8 at 11:07
  • Just tested, you can gather a list of coroutines. If you can gather a list of coroutines, why even bother making them tasks? – Patrick Collins Apr 8 at 11:13
  • For the same reason that you'd otherwise make tasks: if you gather coroutines you just wrap together, they still have to be driven by the current task. – Masklinn Apr 8 at 14:10
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Creating a Task schedules the passed coroutine to be run on an event loop. You can use the Task to cancel the underlying coroutine.

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