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I have a json file where several of the keys are numbers. I found another question that was similar which stated to use bracket notation when trying to access the key when it is a number. I am not sure how to use it in forEach. Everything works fine when I do not have the numbers so the logic works. It is possible that this may be a syntax issue that I am not aware of. Any help or guidance in the right direction would be helpful.

json file:

[
{
    "track": "Virtual 1",
    "data": {
        "20210310": [
            {
                "start": "8:20 a.m.",
                "end": "",
                "company": "Otonomo",
                "ticker": "OTON"
            },

script

const request = new Request('schedule.json');
fetch(request)
  .then((r) => {
    return r.json();
  })
  .then((dataStr) => {
      dataStr.forEach(function(n, i) {
            console.log(Object.keys(n.data));
            n.data["20210310"].forEach(function(data["20210310"]) {
              createTableCells(tab1, "20210310");
            });
2
  • you need a function for forEach; specifically formal parameters. – dandavis Apr 8 at 18:19
  • you already accessed the property using n.data["20210310"].forEach. In the callback function, you need a variable that will receive each of the objects in that array. – Barmar Apr 8 at 18:36
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You are already right and accessing it correctly with the bracket notation. E.g. this will yield you the value you want n.data["20210310"] The issue with your code is the function that you are passing into the forEach loop. You want something like this n.data["20210310"].forEach(function(element) { ...

You can always do a console.log(element); to see what you get within the forEach, but the elemtn will be the nested object with the "start", "end", "company" etc. properties.

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I don't see any Number in your json file, all are strings ... so they can all be reference the "20210310"

This might help you (see codepen : https://codepen.io/michel47-the-encoder/pen/GRrOMgX)

however if you need to use the number within your callback function then you can use a let n = parseInt(k) to get the "real" number instead of the string, or as your numbers seems to be dates, you can so a date = new Date(k.replace(/(....)(..)(..)/,`$1-$2-$3`)); to have a "javascriptDate" !



let json=[
{
   "track": "Virtual 1",
      "data": {
         "20210310": [
         {
            "start": "8:20 a.m.",
            "end": "",
            "company": "Otonomo",
            "ticker": "OTON"
         } ]
      }

}];

((dataStr) => { dataStr.forEach( function(n, i) {
  console.log('n:',n);
  console.log('i:',i);
  console.log(Object.keys(n.data));
  Object.keys(n.data).forEach(
   k => {
     // some code here using n.data[k];
     // like createTableCells(tab1, n.data[k]);
     // etc.
     date = new Date(k.replace(/(....)(..)(..)/,`$1-$2-$3`));
     console.dir(date.toGMTString())
     console.dir(n.data[k]) 

     console.info(`${k}: ${n.data[k][0].ticker}; start: ${n.data[k][0].start}...`);
   });
   
  } )
})(json);

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