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I am wondering what was the best way using C++ to make a class constructor take an argument from a limited list. For example, if I have a class called Colour, then the constructor would only accept Red, Green, or Blue and store the value to a private variable. Then I would have a method called printColour which would print the variable.

Currently, I've been able to get this to work:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class MyClass
{
public:
    typedef enum { A = 3, B = 7 } Options_t;
    MyClass(Options_t);
    void printVal(void);
private:
    Options_t _val;
};

MyClass::MyClass(Options_t val)
{
    _val = val;
}

void MyClass::printVal(void)
{
    cout << _val << endl;
}

MyClass hi(MyClass::A);

int main(void)
{
    hi.printVal();
    return 0;
}

However, the :: notation to access the class's struct seems a bit clunky (I want to write an Arduino Library so it might be beginners needing to use the constructor / methods.

Is there any better way to do this (maybe with . notation?) Thanks!

Edit: When I try to compile with MyClass x(2) (int instead of Options_t), I get this error:

class_enums.cpp:24:9: error: no matching constructor for initialization of 'MyClass'
MyClass hi(2);
        ^  ~
class_enums.cpp:4:7: note: candidate constructor (the implicit copy constructor) not viable: no known
      conversion from 'int' to 'const MyClass' for 1st argument
class MyClass
      ^
class_enums.cpp:14:10: note: candidate constructor not viable: no known conversion from 'int' to
      'MyClass::Options_t' for 1st argument
MyClass::MyClass(Options_t val)
         ^

So it seems that I can't just use an int as the argument?

6
  • 2
    Using “::” is appropriate. However, how do you present me from doing “MyClass x(2)”? – Vlad Feinstein Apr 11 at 14:48
  • C++ is a verbose language. Personally I believe that using the clunky notation keeps things simple and clear. – Raviteja Narra Apr 11 at 16:46
  • @VladFeinstein the constructor only accepts an instance of the struct Options_t. Unless there's something I don't understand? – ktstuff Apr 12 at 2:22
  • Look up the difference between enum and enum class. enum is the old way and will generally implicitly convert from numbers (so Vlad's snippet will work), whereas enum class is more strict in what it accepts. – Silvio Mayolo Apr 12 at 2:26
  • If I try to compile with MyClass x(2);, I get these errors: class_enums.cpp:25:9: error: no matching constructor for initialization of 'MyClass' MyClass x(2); ^ ~ class_enums.cpp:4:7: note: candidate constructor (the implicit copy constructor) not viable: no known conversion from 'int' to 'const MyClass' for 1st argument class MyClass ^ class_enums.cpp:14:10: note: candidate constructor not viable: no known conversion from 'int' to 'MyClass::Options_t' for 1st argument MyClass::MyClass(Options_t val) ^ 1 error generated. – ktstuff Apr 12 at 2:32
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If you just want this during creation of hi, then you can do

MyClass hi(hi.A);

However, in your class, you must use the namespace accessor ::. The . is to access a member of an instance, not the actual class stuff.

They probably explained it better here: When do I use a dot, arrow, or double colon to refer to members of a class in C++? and here: What is the difference between "::" "." and "->" in c++

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Thanks for the help! In the end I decided to go with this code (below) because according to this link, ints are not implicitly converted to an enum value.

Code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

typedef enum { C = 1, D = 6 } Options;

class MyClass
{
public:
    MyClass(Options);
    void printVal(void);
private:
    Options _val;
};

MyClass::MyClass(Options val)
{
    _val = val;
}

void MyClass::printVal(void)
{
    cout << _val << endl;
}

MyClass hi(C);

int main(void)
{
    hi.printVal();
    return 0;
}

Also, doing it this way, I can define a struct for all the Options for the class, then just pass by reference to the constructor, like so:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

typedef enum { C = 1, D = 6 } Options;
typedef struct
{
    Options opt;
} MCConfig;

class MyClass
{
public:
    MyClass(Options);
    MyClass(MCConfig &);
    void printVal(void);
private:
    Options _val;
};

MyClass::MyClass(Options val)
{
    _val = val;
}

MyClass::MyClass(MCConfig & conf)
{
    _val = conf.opt;
}

void MyClass::printVal(void)
{
    cout << _val << endl;
}

MyClass hi(C);

int main(void)
{
    hi.printVal();
    MCConfig c;
    c.opt = D;
    MyClass m(c);
    m.printVal();
    return 0;
}

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