1

I am trying to insert the records of a dbf file into a table in a MS Access database that I have already created.

The dbf file's name is tab1.dbf and it has three columns: cl1, cl2, cl3.

The MS Access database name is db1 and it has one table tb2 with three columns: cl1, cl2, cl3.

I have connected Delphi to the MS Access database using ADOConnection1.

To insert the dbf file's records, I have to click in a Button1 with OpenDialog1

The code I use is this :

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var importdir,ipo : string;

begin
if form1.OpenDialog1.Execute then
begin
importdir:= extractfiledir(form1.OpenDialog1.FileName);
ipo:= form1.OpenDialog1.FileName ;
end;
form1.Edit1.Text:= importdir;
ADOConnection1.Execute('insert into tab2 SELECT * FROM [ database = '+ipo+' ].tab1'  );
end;

but when i execut the form1 i have this error message : name of the file is incorrect

can you help me guys ?

11
  • Where is ADOConnection1 connected? Also first try with a hardcoded filename. – fpiette Apr 11 at 15:42
  • Don't use a form var (form1) inside a form class! – Delphi Coder Apr 11 at 16:04
  • @DelphiCoder This is useless but doesn't really harm. – fpiette Apr 11 at 17:08
  • 2
    @fpiette: Yes, it does hurt. It introduces a restriction that the code only works if you're using a variable in scope named form1. What happens if you're not auto-creating the form but are creating it in code (MyForm := TForm1.Create(nil);)? The code breaks, or you end up accessing the wrong instance of the form. You know this - never refer to a specifc instance of the class within the class itself. If you need to access a member of that class, use Self instead. We try not to encourage bad practices here. – Ken White Apr 11 at 22:57
  • 1
    @fpiette: You didn't say It's bad practice but it's not the problem here. What you wrote was This is useless but doesn't really harm, which can be interpreted (especially by a new user) to mean that it never causes harm and therefore is OK to do, which it is not. I even mentioned that I knew you were aware of this - I wasn't meaning to offend, just to avoid writing things that might be misunderstood by a new coder. – Ken White Apr 12 at 12:22
0

Here after is one simple solution. It simple because it assume the Access database structure is the same as the dBASE structure. You'll get started with this example that you'll adapt to your needs.

procedure TDbfToAccessWithAdoForm.DbfToAccessButtonClick(Sender: TObject);
var
    Fld       : Integer;
    FldValue  : Variant;
    InsertSQL : String;
begin
    ADOConnectionAccess.Connected := TRUE;
    ADOConnectionDbf.Connected    := TRUE;
    ADOQueryDbf.SQL.Text          := 'Select * from Clients';
    ADOQueryDbf.Open;

    // Build the parametrized INSERT statement
    InsertSQL := 'insert into Clients(';
    for Fld := 0 to ADOQueryDbf.FieldCount - 1 do
        InsertSQL := InsertSQL + ADOQueryDbf.Fields[Fld].FieldName + ',';
    // Remove extra coma
    Delete(InsertSQL, Length(InsertSQL), 1);
    InsertSQL := InsertSQL + ') values (';
    for Fld := 0 to ADOQueryDbf.FieldCount - 1 do
        InsertSQL := InsertSQL + ':' + ADOQueryDbf.Fields[Fld].FieldName + ',';
    // Remove extra coma
    Delete(InsertSQL, Length(InsertSQL), 1);
    InsertSQL := InsertSQL + ')';

    while not ADOQueryDbf.Eof do begin
        ADOQueryAccess.SQL.Text := InsertSQL;
        for Fld := 0 to ADOQueryDbf.FieldCount - 1 do begin
            FldValue := ADOQueryDbf.Fields[Fld].Value;
            // Here you can do whatever conversion is required
            if FldValue = Null then begin
                if ADOQueryDbf.FieldDefList[Fld].DataType = ftDateTime then
                    FldValue := 0      // My Access table doesn't like empty datetime
                else
                    FldValue := ' ';   // My Access table doesn't like empty string
            end;
            ADOQueryAccess.Parameters.ParamByName(ADOQueryDbf.Fields[Fld].FieldName).Value := FldValue;
        end;
        ADOQueryAccess.ExecSQL;
        ADOQueryDbf.Next;
    end;

    ADOQueryDbf.Close;
    ADOQueryAccess.Close;
end;

You should add error checking and try/finally or try/except. I let you do it as you do usually.

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