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I'm trying to call the init function of the screen I'm changing my screen index to

For an example, i have this code:

from PyQt5 import QtWidgets   as qtw
from PyQt5 import QtGui       as qtg
from sys   import argv        as sysArgv
from sys   import exit        as sysExit

arialLarge = qtg.QFont("Arial", 18)

class MainWindow(qtw.QWidget):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()
        # Current screen label;
        mainWindowLabel = qtw.QLabel("This is the main window", self)
        mainWindowLabel.setFont(arialLarge)
        mainWindowLabel.move(20, 40)
        # Button for going to the HelloWindow screen;
        gotoHelloWindowButton = qtw.QPushButton("Go to hello window", self, clicked=lambda: appStack.setCurrentIndex(appStack.currentIndex()+1))
        gotoHelloWindowButton.move(100, 100)


class HelloWindow(qtw.QWidget):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()
        # EG: print hello world when I visit this page
        print("hello world")


        # Current screen label;
        helloWindowLabel = qtw.QLabel("This is the hello window", self)
        helloWindowLabel.setFont(arialLarge)
        helloWindowLabel.move(20, 40)
        # Button for going to the MainWindow screen;
        gotoMainWindowButton = qtw.QPushButton("Go to main window", self, clicked=lambda: appStack.setCurrentIndex(appStack.currentIndex()-1))
        gotoMainWindowButton.move(100, 100)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    app = qtw.QApplication(sysArgv)
    appStack = qtw.QStackedWidget()
    appStack.addWidget(MainWindow())
    appStack.setFixedSize(300, 300)
    appStack.show()
    appStack.addWidget(HelloWindow())
    sysExit(app.exec())

If im visiting the HelloWindow from the MainWindow, how can i run the init function of the HelloWindow screen so I can run whatever code I want in there?

I need to be able to do this as on the app im working on as on the mainpage i have dynamically created buttons that all have functions parameters with different indexes to my server, and i need to be able to fetch the data from server based off the clicked button's data index so on the other page I can view the desired data.

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  • I know what your talking about, but I need to be able to create new screen instances, I also did try creating the instances whenevr i clickedd a button but that is creating memory leaks, so yeah, this is my only way around this. And yes I couldd create different windows but thats not what i want to do – bosdos12 Apr 11 at 19:44
  • No, I've read your other question and I repeat what was said there: it does not create memory leaks, it's just that you don't use it correctly. A memory leak is a completely different thing. Exactly as it was said there, you don't have to call __init__ again, you should create a function that does what you need and call it both from the __init__ and whenever you need to show/update the widget again. Before worrying about inexistent memory leaks for the wrong reasons, you should better study and understand what classes and instances are. – musicamante Apr 11 at 20:01
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The __init__ of a python class is what is called when an instance is created (using SomeClass()), so you should not try (or even think) to call it again, as it could create serious problems and bugs that are hard to track.

I strongly suggest you to read the documentation about classes in Python, as you cannot ignore that aspect in object oriented programming.

If you need to call something everytime the index is changed, then you should better subclass QStackedWidget and control everything from there.

A good solution is to create a standardized function that will be called everytime the page is presented, and ensure that the stack widget correctly calls it.

class FirstPage(QtWidgets.QWidget):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__(self)
        # ...
        self.nextButton = QtWidgets.QPushButton('Next')
        self.doSomething()

    def doSomething(self):
        ...


class SecondPage(QtWidgets.QWidget):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__(self)
        # ...
        self.prevButton = QtWidgets.QPushButton('Previous')
        self.doSomething()

    def doSomething(self):
        ...


class Stack(QtWidgets.QStackedWidget):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__(self)
        self.first = FirstPage()
        self.first.nextButton.clicked.connect(self.goNext)
        self.addWidget(self.first)

        self.second = SecondPage()
        self.second.prevButton.clicked.connect(self.goPrev)

        self.currentChanged.connect(self.initCurrent)

    def goNext(self):
        self.setCurrentIndex(1)

    def goPrev(self):
        self.setCurrentIndex(0)

    def initCurrent()
        if self.currentWidget():
            self.currentWidget().doSomething()


if __name__ == "__main__":
    app = qtw.QApplication(sysArgv)
    appStack = Stack()
    appStack.setFixedSize(300, 300)
    appStack.show()
    sysExit(app.exec())

Note that adding a QMainWindow to a parent is not a good idea, as Qt main windows are intended to be used as top level windows; also note that using fixed geometries (positions and sizes) is often considered bad practice, and you should use layout managers instead.

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  • 1
    I'm going to slightly disagree with the comment about parenting QMainWindow. In general, I agree, but there's a useful exception. Toolbars only work completely properly when embedded in a QMainWindow. I've needed to embed QMainWindows in tabs so that I could have a drawing application with a properly functioning toolbar inside each tab. It worked fine, and it was far easier than trying to work around the toolbar problems in any other way. Otherwise, I agree; if you're looking at embedding for some other reason, maybe see if there's a better way. – goug Apr 12 at 21:19
  • @goug Yes, there are limit cases. I know of a "trick" about using nested QMainWindows that allows multiple "levels" of QDockWidgets (with limitations to the areas in which the docks can be placed). As always, there are various levels of exceptions, and one could do almost anything the language/framework allows (even if normally unsuggested, discouraged or that wasn't thought for), as long as one knows what is being done. We know cars can jump from ramps and land safely, but if you're approaching a ramp while learning to drive I doubt your instructor would tell you it's fine do go on. – musicamante Apr 12 at 22:33
  • I like to push the "limits" of Qt along with my knowledge and experience, doing experiments, see the results... and I don't object if I see "unorthodox" usage if a user shows enough experience to be able to manage advanced aspects; but if I see that same usage from what clearly seems an unexperienced/beginner user, it's a form of responsibility to warn them about it and inform about the preferred practice: there's no point in listing all (valid) exceptions, if the correct practices are not known yet. You have to know and master the rules before learning how to break them with fashion ;-) – musicamante Apr 12 at 22:44
  • In this specific case if you only need to embed a "window" a common beginner mistake is to confuse QMainWindow as "the only" available window, but there's generally no need for that. Also, if you need a menubar, any QLayout already provides setMenuBar(), while if a status bar is required, it's enough to have a "main" QVBoxLayout and add a QStatusBar to it. There are important differences obviuosly: for instance, they can be created in Designer by default only for QMainWindows, and QStatusBar doesn't automatically show status tips of children. – musicamante Apr 12 at 22:53

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