0

I'm working on a project that requires me to import a text file, read the file, and sort the words in different ways(i.e. ascending order, unique words, etc...). So far, I've been able to import the file and have it print, that it, until I added the commands to sort the list into lines and words.

I've used a buffered reader to store the lines and the words, but upon execution, I don't know if the data has been stored in the separate arraylists, and the console doesn't print the number of words stored in ArrayList wordList.

Where am I going wrong here?

Here is my code so far:

public static void main(String[] args)throws IOException{
  if(args.length == 0){
    System.out.println("Error, usage: java ClassName inputfile");
    System.exit(1);
  }
  File randomText = new File(args[0]);
    if(randomText.exists() && randomText.isFile()){
      processFile(randomText);
    } else{
        System.err.println("ERROR: file does not exist");
        System.exit(1);
      }
 }

public static void processFile(File randomText)throws IOException, FileNotFoundException{
  ArrayList<String> lineList = new ArrayList<String>();
  ArrayList<String> wordList = new ArrayList<String>();

  BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(randomText));
  StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
  String line;
  while((line=br.readLine()) != null){
    sb.append(line);
    sb.append("\n");
    lineList.add(line);
  }
  while((line = br.readLine()) != null){
    wordList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(line.split(" |.")));
    }
    System.out.println("Total number of words in the file: " + wordList.size());
    br.close();
}
2
  • 2
    File readers (and BufferedReader in particular, in your case) read the file once in sequence. Once you've read it, it's gone. You need to either seek back to the beginning of the file or iterate over the lines array to split into words. – Silvio Mayolo Apr 12 at 2:15
  • 1
    Can you post (at least part of) the text file so that I can test my code on your actual data? Does the file contain only ASCII characters? – Abra Apr 12 at 4:45
0

You are missing wordList.addAll(Arrays.asList(line.split(" |.")));

Declared : wordList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(line.split(" |."))); This only add last line words

There are two ways you can do it.

  1. create an another BufferedReader and add to wordList
    BufferedReader br1 = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(randomText));
            while((line = br1.readLine()) != null){
              }
              System.out.println("Total number of words in the file: " + wordList.size());
              br1.close();
          }
  1. add to wordList in single while loop
public static void main(String[] args) throws FileNotFoundException, IOException {
      if (args.length == 0) {
          System.out.println("Error, usage: java ClassName inputfile");
          System.exit(1);
      }
      File randomText = new File(args[0]);
      if (randomText.exists() && randomText.isFile()) {
          processFile(randomText);
      } else {
          System.err.println("ERROR: file does not exist");
          System.exit(1);
      }
  }
  public static void processFile(File randomText) throws IOException, FileNotFoundException {
      ArrayList<String> lineList = new ArrayList<String>();
      ArrayList<String> wordList = new ArrayList<String>();
      BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(randomText));
      StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
      String line;
      while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
          sb.append(line);
          sb.append("\n");
          lineList.add(line);
          wordList.addAll(Arrays.asList(line.split(" |.")));
      }
      System.out.println("Total number of words in the file: " + wordList.size());
      br.close();
  }
1
  • Thank you. I had to move a couple things around in my code, but using this strategy allowed me to print out the correct number of words. – FinMartinez Apr 14 at 20:44
0

As others noted, you cannot reuse a file reader. You read the file once, and then that reader object is done. So let's read that file into a list of lines. Then use that list of lines to get a list of words.

By the way, the java.io.File class has been supplanted by the java.nio.file framework, as noted at the end of the File Javadoc’s overview. That note suggests using toPath to convert to a Path object.

File file = new File( "/Users/basilbourque/names.txt" );
Path path = file.toPath();

From that Path object, we can obtain a stream of the lines from that file via Files.lines.

Stream < String > lines = Files.lines( path )

For example, try dumping the lines to console.

try ( Stream < String > lines = Files.lines( path ) )
{
    lines.forEach( s -> System.out.println( s ) );
}
catch ( IOException e )
{
    e.printStackTrace();
}

We want to collect the lines into a List. In Java 16 we have shorter syntax for capturing a stream to a list with new method Stream#toList, instead of using a collector explicitly.

List < String > lines = List.of();
try { lines = Files.lines( path ).toList(); } catch ( IOException e ) { e.printStackTrace(); }

We can shorten that further by using Files.readAllLines.

List < String > lines = List.of();
try { lines = Files.readAllLines( path ); } catch ( IOException e ) { e.printStackTrace(); }

Use List.copyOf to make an unmodifiable list, ensuring no changes are made to the contents of the list.

List < String > lines = List.of();
try { lines = List.copyOf( Files.readAllLines( path ) ); } catch ( IOException e ) { e.printStackTrace(); }

lines.toString() = [Alice engineer, Bob cook, Carol pilot, Darren astronaut, Edith dancer, Frank poet]

For each line, get a list of words.

for ( String line : lines )
{
    List < String > words = List.of( line.split( " " ) );  // Pass `split` method’s returned array of strings to `List.of` to get an unmodifiable list of the words.
    System.out.println( words.size() + " words in: " + words );
}

Pull all that code together.

File file = new File( "/Users/basilbourque/names.txt" );
Path path = file.toPath();

List < String > lines = List.of(); // Default to empty list.
try { lines = List.copyOf( Files.readAllLines( path ) ); } catch ( IOException e ) { e.printStackTrace(); }
System.out.println( "lines = " + lines );

for ( String line : lines )
{
    List < String > words = List.of( line.split( " " ) );  // Pass `split` method’s returned array of strings to `List.of` to get an unmodifiable list of the words.
    System.out.println( words.size() + " words in: " + words );
}

When run.

lines = [Alice engineer, Bob cook, Carol pilot, Darren astronaut, Edith dancer, Frank poet]
2 words in: [Alice, engineer]
2 words in: [Bob, cook]
2 words in: [Carol, pilot]
2 words in: [Darren, astronaut]
2 words in: [Edith, dancer]
2 words in: [Frank, poet]
2
  • Is Files.lines() preferred over Files.readAllLines()? Also, how do you know that the words in the text file are separated by single space only? Will your solution work if the text file contains punctuation as well? – Abra Apr 12 at 5:42
  • @Abra Sure, Files.readAllLines works too. As for parsing words, I gave a simple example, as word delimiters was not defined in the Question. – Basil Bourque Apr 12 at 6:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.