91

I'm developing game app and using Symfony 2.0. I have many AJAX requests to the backend. And more responses is converting entity to JSON. For example:

class DefaultController extends Controller
{           
    public function launchAction()
    {   
        $user = $this->getDoctrine()
                     ->getRepository('UserBundle:User')                
                     ->find($id);

        // encode user to json format
        $userDataAsJson = $this->encodeUserDataToJson($user);
        return array(
            'userDataAsJson' => $userDataAsJson
        );            
    }

    private function encodeUserDataToJson(User $user)
    {
        $userData = array(
            'id' => $user->getId(),
            'profile' => array(
                'nickname' => $user->getProfile()->getNickname()
            )
        );

        $jsonEncoder = new JsonEncoder();        
        return $jsonEncoder->encode($userData, $format = 'json');
    }
}

And all my controllers do the same thing: get an entity and encode some of its fields to JSON. I know that I can use normalizers and encode all entitities. But what if an entity has cycled links to other entity? Or the entities graph is very big? Do you have any suggestions?

I think about some encoding schema for entities... or using NormalizableInterface to avoid cycling..,

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12 Answers 12

83

Another option is to use the JMSSerializerBundle. In your controller you then do

$serializer = $this->container->get('serializer');
$reports = $serializer->serialize($doctrineobject, 'json');
return new Response($reports); // should be $reports as $doctrineobject is not serialized

You can configure how the serialization is done by using annotations in the entity class. See the documentation in the link above. For example, here's how you would exclude linked entities:

 /**
* Iddp\RorBundle\Entity\Report
*
* @ORM\Table()
* @ORM\Entity(repositoryClass="Iddp\RorBundle\Entity\ReportRepository")
* @ExclusionPolicy("None")
*/
....
/**
* @ORM\ManyToOne(targetEntity="Client", inversedBy="reports")
* @ORM\JoinColumn(name="client_id", referencedColumnName="id")
* @Exclude
*/
protected $client;
| |
  • 7
    you need to add use JMS\SerializerBundle\Annotation\ExclusionPolicy; use JMS\SerializerBundle\Annotation\Exclude; in your entity and install JMSSerializerBundle in order for this to work – ioleo Jul 7 '12 at 14:21
  • 3
    Works great if you change it to: return new Response($reports); – Greywire Feb 3 '13 at 7:21
  • 7
    Since the annotations have been moved out of the bundle, the correct use statements are now: use JMS\Serializer\Annotation\ExclusionPolicy; use JMS\Serializer\Annotation\Exclude; – Pier-Luc Gendreau Apr 6 '13 at 20:02
  • 3
    The documentation for Doctrine says not to serialize objects or serialize with great care. – Bluebaron May 31 '13 at 22:36
  • I did not even need to install JMSSerializerBundle. Your code worked without requiring JMSSerializerBundle. – Derk Jan Speelman Aug 22 at 18:12
149

With php5.4 now you can do :

use JsonSerializable;

/**
* @Entity(repositoryClass="App\Entity\User")
* @Table(name="user")
*/
class MyUserEntity implements JsonSerializable
{
    /** @Column(length=50) */
    private $name;

    /** @Column(length=50) */
    private $login;

    public function jsonSerialize()
    {
        return array(
            'name' => $this->name,
            'login'=> $this->login,
        );
    }
}

And then call

json_encode(MyUserEntity);
| |
  • 3
    This is a great solution if you are tying to keep your dependencies on other bundles to a minimum... – Drmjo Jan 5 '15 at 23:55
  • 6
    What about linked entities? – John the Ripper Apr 4 '16 at 12:49
  • 8
    This does not seem to work with entity collections (ie: OneToMany relations) – Pierre de LESPINAY Jun 14 '16 at 15:28
  • 2
    This violates the single responsibility principle and is no good if your entities are auto generated by doctrine – jim smith Apr 16 '18 at 16:21
39

You can automatically encode into Json, your complex entity with:

use Symfony\Component\Serializer\Serializer;
use Symfony\Component\Serializer\Normalizer\GetSetMethodNormalizer;
use Symfony\Component\Serializer\Encoder\JsonEncoder;

$serializer = new Serializer(array(new GetSetMethodNormalizer()), array('json' => new 
JsonEncoder()));
$json = $serializer->serialize($entity, 'json');
| |
  • 3
    Thanks, but I have Player entity that has link to Game entities collection and every Game entity have link to players that played in it. Something like this. And do you think GetSetMethodNormalizer will correctly work (it uses recursive algorithm)? – Dmytro Krasun Jul 15 '11 at 21:11
  • 2
    Yes it's recursive and that was my problem in my case. So, for specific entities, you can use the CustomNormalizer and its NormalizableInterface as you seem know. – webda2l Jul 17 '11 at 13:42
  • 2
    When I tried this I got "Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 134217728 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 64 bytes) in /home/jason/pressbox/vendor/symfony/src/Symfony/Component/Serializer/Normalizer/GetSetMethodNormalizer.php on line 44". I wonder why? – Jason Swett Jun 22 '12 at 15:13
  • 1
    when I tried I got below exception.. Fatal error: Maximum function nesting level of '100' reached, aborting! in C:\wamp\www\myapp\application\libraries\doctrine\Symfony\Component\Serializer\Normalizer\GetSetMethodNormalizer.php on line 223 – user2350626 Oct 2 '13 at 18:26
  • 1
    @user2350626, see stackoverflow.com/questions/4293775/… – webda2l Oct 3 '13 at 9:23
11

To complete the answer: Symfony2 comes with a wrapper around json_encode: Symfony/Component/HttpFoundation/JsonResponse

Typical usage in your Controllers:

...
use Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\JsonResponse;
...
public function acmeAction() {
...
return new JsonResponse($array);
}
| |
10

I found the solution to the problem of serializing entities was as follows:

#config/config.yml

services:
    serializer.method:
        class: Symfony\Component\Serializer\Normalizer\GetSetMethodNormalizer
    serializer.encoder.json:
        class: Symfony\Component\Serializer\Encoder\JsonEncoder
    serializer:
        class: Symfony\Component\Serializer\Serializer
        arguments:
            - [@serializer.method]
            - {json: @serializer.encoder.json }

in my controller:

$serializer = $this->get('serializer');

$entity = $this->get('doctrine')
               ->getRepository('myBundle:Entity')
               ->findOneBy($params);


$collection = $this->get('doctrine')
               ->getRepository('myBundle:Entity')
               ->findBy($params);

$toEncode = array(
    'response' => array(
        'entity' => $serializer->normalize($entity),
        'entities' => $serializer->normalize($collection)
    ),
);

return new Response(json_encode($toEncode));

other example:

$serializer = $this->get('serializer');

$collection = $this->get('doctrine')
               ->getRepository('myBundle:Entity')
               ->findBy($params);

$json = $serializer->serialize($collection, 'json');

return new Response($json);

you can even configure it to deserialize arrays in http://api.symfony.com/2.0

| |
6

I just had to solve the same problem: json-encoding an entity ("User") having a One-To-Many Bidirectional Association to another Entity ("Location").

I tried several things and I think now I found the best acceptable solution. The idea was to use the same code as written by David, but somehow intercept the infinite recursion by telling the Normalizer to stop at some point.

I did not want to implement a custom normalizer, as this GetSetMethodNormalizer is a nice approach in my opinion (based on reflection etc.). So I've decided to subclass it, which is not trivial at first sight, because the method to say if to include a property (isGetMethod) is private.

But, one could override the normalize method, so I intercepted at this point, by simply unsetting the property that references "Location" - so the inifinite loop is interrupted.

In code it looks like this:

class GetSetMethodNormalizer extends \Symfony\Component\Serializer\Normalizer\GetSetMethodNormalizer {

    public function normalize($object, $format = null)
    {
        // if the object is a User, unset location for normalization, without touching the original object
        if($object instanceof \Leonex\MoveBundle\Entity\User) {
            $object = clone $object;
            $object->setLocations(new \Doctrine\Common\Collections\ArrayCollection());
        }

        return parent::normalize($object, $format);
    }

} 
| |
  • 1
    I wonder how easy it'd be to generalize this, so that 1. never any need to touch the Entity classes, 2. Not just blank the "Locations", but every Collections type field which potentially maps to other Entites. I.e. no internal/advance knowledge of Ent required to serialize it, recursion-free. – Marcos Mar 30 '15 at 16:27
6

I had the same problem and I chosed to create my own encoder, which will cope by themself with recursion.

I created classes which implements Symfony\Component\Serializer\Normalizer\NormalizerInterface, and a service which holds every NormalizerInterface.

#This is the NormalizerService

class NormalizerService 
{

   //normalizer are stored in private properties
   private $entityOneNormalizer;
   private $entityTwoNormalizer;

   public function getEntityOneNormalizer()
   {
    //Normalizer are created only if needed
    if ($this->entityOneNormalizer == null)
        $this->entityOneNormalizer = new EntityOneNormalizer($this); //every normalizer keep a reference to this service

    return $this->entityOneNormalizer;
   }

   //create a function for each normalizer



  //the serializer service will also serialize the entities 
  //(i found it easier, but you don't really need it)
   public function serialize($objects, $format)
   {
     $serializer = new Serializer(
            array(
                $this->getEntityOneNormalizer(),
                $this->getEntityTwoNormalizer()
            ),
            array($format => $encoder) );

     return $serializer->serialize($response, $format);
}

An example of a Normalizer :

use Symfony\Component\Serializer\Normalizer\NormalizerInterface;

class PlaceNormalizer implements NormalizerInterface {

private $normalizerService;

public function __construct($normalizerService)
{
    $this->service = normalizerService;

}

public function normalize($object, $format = null) {
    $entityTwo = $object->getEntityTwo();
    $entityTwoNormalizer = $this->service->getEntityTwoNormalizer();

    return array(
        'param' => object->getParam(),
        //repeat for every parameter
        //!!!! this is where the entityOneNormalizer dealt with recursivity
        'entityTwo' => $entityTwoNormalizer->normalize($entityTwo, $format.'_without_any_entity_one') //the 'format' parameter is adapted for ignoring entity one - this may be done with different ways (a specific method, etc.)
    );
}

}

In a controller :

$normalizerService = $this->get('normalizer.service'); //you will have to configure services.yml
$json = $normalizerService->serialize($myobject, 'json');
return new Response($json);

The complete code is here : https://github.com/progracqteur/WikiPedale/tree/master/src/Progracqteur/WikipedaleBundle/Resources/Normalizer

| |
6

in Symfony 2.3

/app/config/config.yml

framework:
    # сервис конвертирования объектов в массивы, json, xml и обратно
    serializer:
        enabled: true

services:
    object_normalizer:
        class: Symfony\Component\Serializer\Normalizer\GetSetMethodNormalizer
        tags:
        # помечаем к чему относится этот сервис, это оч. важно, т.к. иначе работать не будет
          - { name: serializer.normalizer }

and example for your controller:

/**
 * Поиск сущности по ИД объекта и ИД языка
 * @Route("/search/", name="orgunitSearch")
 */
public function orgunitSearchAction()
{
    $array = $this->get('request')->query->all();

    $entity = $this->getDoctrine()
        ->getRepository('IntranetOrgunitBundle:Orgunit')
        ->findOneBy($array);

    $serializer = $this->get('serializer');
    //$json = $serializer->serialize($entity, 'json');
    $array = $serializer->normalize($entity);

    return new JsonResponse( $array );
}

but the problems with the field type \DateTime will remain.

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6

This is more an update (for Symfony v:2.7+ and JmsSerializer v:0.13.*@dev), so to avoid that Jms tries to load and serialise the whole object graph ( or in case of cyclic relation ..)

Model:

use Doctrine\ORM\Mapping as ORM;
use JMS\Serializer\Annotation\ExclusionPolicy;  
use JMS\Serializer\Annotation\Exclude;  
use JMS\Serializer\Annotation\MaxDepth; /* <=== Required */
/**
 * User
 *
 * @ORM\Table(name="user_table")
///////////////// OTHER Doctrine proprieties //////////////
 */
 public class User
{
    /**
     * @var integer
     *
     * @ORM\Column(name="id", type="integer")
     * @ORM\Id
     * @ORM\GeneratedValue(strategy="AUTO")
     */
    protected   $id;

    /**
     * @ORM\ManyToOne(targetEntity="FooBundle\Entity\Game")
     * @ORM\JoinColumn(nullable=false)
     * @MaxDepth(1)
     */
    protected $game;
   /*
      Other proprieties ....and Getters ans setters
      ......................
      ......................
   */

Inside an Action:

use JMS\Serializer\SerializationContext;
  /* Necessary include to enbale max depth */

  $users = $this
              ->getDoctrine()
              ->getManager()
              ->getRepository("FooBundle:User")
              ->findAll();

  $serializer = $this->container->get('jms_serializer');
  $jsonContent = $serializer
                   ->serialize(
                        $users, 
                        'json', 
                        SerializationContext::create()
                                 ->enableMaxDepthChecks()
                  );

  return new Response($jsonContent);
| |
5

If you are using Symfony 2.7 or above, and don't want to include any additional bundle for serializing, maybe you can follow this way to seialize doctrine entities to json -

  1. In my (common, parent) controller, I have a function that prepares the serializer

    use Symfony\Component\Serializer\Encoder\JsonEncoder;
    use Symfony\Component\Serializer\Mapping\Factory\ClassMetadataFactory;
    use Symfony\Component\Serializer\Mapping\Loader\AnnotationLoader;
    use Symfony\Component\Serializer\Normalizer\ObjectNormalizer;
    use Symfony\Component\Serializer\Serializer;
    
    // -----------------------------
    
    /**
     * @return Serializer
     */
    protected function _getSerializer()
    {  
        $classMetadataFactory = new ClassMetadataFactory(new AnnotationLoader(new AnnotationReader()));
        $normalizer           = new ObjectNormalizer($classMetadataFactory);
    
        return new Serializer([$normalizer], [new JsonEncoder()]);
    }
    
  2. Then use it to serialize Entities to JSON

    $this->_getSerializer()->normalize($anEntity, 'json');
    $this->_getSerializer()->normalize($arrayOfEntities, 'json');
    

Done!

But you may need some fine tuning. For example -

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4

When you need to create a lot of REST API endpoints on Symfony, the best way is to use following stack of bundles:

  1. JMSSerializerBundle for the serialization of Doctrine entities
  2. FOSRestBundle bundle for response view listener. Also it can generate definition of routes based on controller/action name.
  3. NelmioApiDocBundle to auto-generate online documentation and Sandbox(which allows to test endpoint without any external tool).

When you configure everything properly, you entity code will look like:

use Doctrine\ORM\Mapping as ORM;
use JMS\Serializer\Annotation as JMS;

/**
 * @ORM\Table(name="company")
 */
class Company
{

    /**
     * @var string
     *
     * @ORM\Column(name="name", type="string", length=255)
     *
     * @JMS\Expose()
     * @JMS\SerializedName("name")
     * @JMS\Groups({"company_overview"})
     */
    private $name;

    /**
     * @var Campaign[]
     *
     * @ORM\OneToMany(targetEntity="Campaign", mappedBy="company")
     * 
     * @JMS\Expose()
     * @JMS\SerializedName("campaigns")
     * @JMS\Groups({"campaign_overview"})
     */
    private $campaigns;
}

Then, code in controller:

use Nelmio\ApiDocBundle\Annotation\ApiDoc;
use FOS\RestBundle\Controller\Annotations\View;

class CompanyController extends Controller
{

    /**
     * Retrieve all companies
     *
     * @View(serializerGroups={"company_overview"})
     * @ApiDoc()
     *
     * @return Company[]
     */
    public function cgetAction()
    {
        return $this->getDoctrine()->getRepository(Company::class)->findAll();
    }
}

The benefits of such set up are:

  • @JMS\Expose() annotations in entity can be added to simple fields, and to any types of relations. Also there is possibility to expose result of some method execution (use annotation @JMS\VirtualProperty() for that)
  • With serialization groups we can control exposed fields in different situations.
  • Controllers are very simple. Action method can directly return an entity or array of entities, and they will be automatically serialized.
  • And @ApiDoc() allows to test the endpoint directly from browser, without any REST client or JavaScript code
| |
1

Now you can also use Doctrine ORM Transformations to convert entities to nested arrays of scalars and back

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