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Is there any way of detecting redundant constraints in Haskell?

For example:

class    (A a, B a) => C1 a -- C1 ~ A AND B
instance (A a, B a) => C1 a

class    (A a, B a, C a) => C2 a
instance (A a, B a, C a) => C2 a

f :: (C1 a, C2 a) => a
f = ...

Here, C2 implies C1, and use of C1 in the signature of f is redundant, i.e. tautological.

In a real-world metaprogramming situation, This would be waaaay more complex, and would significantly help de-clutter signature heads, as well as help me understand and keep track of what is going on.

Is this logically possible, given GHC's formalism?

Is the infrastructure available within GHC?

0
4

If I put your stub in a file:

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-}
{-# LANGUAGE UndecidableInstances #-}
class A a
class B a
class C a

class    (A a, B a) => C1 a -- C1 ~ A AND B
instance (A a, B a) => C1 a

class    (A a, B a, C a) => C2 a
instance (A a, B a, C a) => C2 a

Then you can learn about redundant constraints by binding a variable to undefined and the type you're interested in reducing in ghci:

> x = undefined :: (C1 a, C2 a) => a

<interactive>:1:18: warning: [-Wsimplifiable-class-constraints]
    • The constraint ‘C1 a’ matches
        instance forall a. (A a, B a) => C1 a -- Defined at test.hs:8:10
      This makes type inference for inner bindings fragile;
        either use MonoLocalBinds, or simplify it using the instance
    • In an expression type signature: (C1 a, C2 a) => a
      In the expression: undefined :: (C1 a, C2 a) => a
      In an equation for ‘x’: x = undefined :: (C1 a, C2 a) => a

<interactive>:1:18: warning: [-Wsimplifiable-class-constraints]
    • The constraint ‘C2 a’ matches
        instance forall a. (A a, B a, C a) => C2 a
          -- Defined at test.hs:11:10
      This makes type inference for inner bindings fragile;
        either use MonoLocalBinds, or simplify it using the instance
    • In an expression type signature: (C1 a, C2 a) => a
      In the expression: undefined :: (C1 a, C2 a) => a
      In an equation for ‘x’: x = undefined :: (C1 a, C2 a) => a
*Main
> :t x
x :: forall {a}. (A a, B a, C a) => a

The first two warnings in this case are actually just a happy accident, related to how simple your stub is; you won't always get them. The truly interesting bit is the second query, :t x, which has reduced the constraints to the basic facts that you need to know about a.

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  • That is interesting. As you say, I don't think -Wsimplifiable-class-constraints is very useful in practice, case in point - I've never seen it before. The :t trick is interesting, but it just gives a 'canonical' set of constraints, not eliminate the redundant ones in the set supplied. – Ari Fordsham Apr 14 at 15:34
  • @AriFordsham It does eliminate redundant constraints. For example, :t undefined :: (Eq a, Ord a) => a produces Ord a => a. Indeed, even in the example shown, it didn't blindly turn C1 into A, B and C2 into A, B, C -- there are no duplicate A or B constraints in the output. – Daniel Wagner Apr 14 at 15:58
  • Right, but It doesn't tell me which constraints in my code are redundant. I have to manually rebuild the composite constraints (C1 in the example) from this list. – Ari Fordsham Apr 14 at 16:02
  • @AriFordsham C1 and C2 are both redundant, because A, B, and C are simpler. ;-) – Daniel Wagner Apr 14 at 16:46
  • 1
    There's really nothing wrong with simplifiable constraints. They can aid in documentation. – dfeuer Apr 14 at 18:53

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