16

I have the following endpoint setup to reset a database after test runs:

import { getConnection } from 'typeorm';
import express from 'express';
const router = express.Router();

const resetDatabase = async (): Promise<void> => {
  const connection = getConnection();
  await connection.dropDatabase();
  await connection.synchronize();
};

// typescript-eslint throws an error in the following route:
router.post('/reset', async (_request, response) => {
  await resetTestDatabase();
  response.status(204).end();
});

export default router;

The entire route since async is underlined with a typescript-eslint error Promise returned in function argument where a void return was expected.

The app works perfectly but I'm not sure if I should be doing a safer implementation or just ignoring/disabling Eslint for this one. Any idea of what's wrong with that code?

2
  • 1
    I put this into the Typescript playground and it compiles without any errors so I don't think anything is wrong with the code. Maybe if you share your linting configuration we can get to the bottom of it. Apr 15, 2021 at 18:46
  • 1
    Actually scratch that, I've checked what linting rule causes this and I'll write a proper answer Apr 15, 2021 at 18:48

3 Answers 3

17

I found a solution that doesn't involves using then() and let you use the abstraction of async without getting cursed by the eslint, there's two solutions (but i recommend more the second one)

First Solution: Using "inside async"

This is basic using a async inside the void like this:

router.post('/reset', (_request, response) => {
    (async () => {
        await resetTestDatabase();
        response.status(204).end();
    })()
});

Second Solution (recommended): "Type Overlap"

The second option is to you use it as an async, as Always, but say "hey TypeScript, nothing is wrong here hehe" with the "as" keyword

import { RequestHandler } from 'express'

router.post('/reset', (async (_request, response) => {
    await resetTestDatabase();
    response.status(204).end();
}) as RequestHandler);
5
  • What's the benefit of doing this? It sounds like OP gets a linting error for something that's desired behavior. Rather than create a complicated workaround for the linting error, it makes way more sense to disable the rule... unless I'm missing something.
    – Evert
    Nov 18, 2021 at 3:32
  • Well, sometimes to disable some rules is kinda mean when you're using eslint, because if you don't want rules, why you using eslint after all? 👍🤔
    – KuryKat
    Nov 24, 2021 at 19:41
  • 2
    I think that's a great question! Why use eslint at all? To me it's to enforce certain rules around code that ensure that the code is better. If applying a rule makes code worse, it's not a good rule.
    – Evert
    Nov 24, 2021 at 19:52
  • Fair enough, make sense
    – KuryKat
    Dec 4, 2021 at 6:40
  • 1
    You use eslint, because this is a very valid error that in some cases causes terribly hard to find bugs. It's just that this is not such a case, that's why you ignore it just here, not for all the code.
    – LachoTomov
    Apr 12, 2023 at 10:37
10

After also going around the houses a little, here is an update:

Express 5 now handles this correctly. Confirmation here from the Express maintainers:

Typings however are not yet (at the time of writing) updated/available for Express 5 so the error still displays, despite being resolved. Follow here on the DefinitelyTyped repo for conversation on updates.

In the meantime, as suggested already by KuryKat, handling with the RequestHandler should be safe in Express 5.

import { RequestHandler } from 'express'

router.post('/reset', (async (_request, response) => {
    await resetTestDatabase();
    response.status(204).end();
}) as RequestHandler);

In Express 4 however, better to handle the error either with an explicit .catch(...):

app.get("/manifest.webmanifest", (_req, res) => {
  getManifest(pwaOptions)
    .then(result => res.send(result))
    .catch(error => res.status(500).send('Unexpected error'))
});

Or use an async handler:

express-async-handler

express-async-router

See discussion here regarding Express 4 for reference.

1
  • I think for the time being where ExpressJS5 is still in beta the express-async-handler is the "cleanest" solution. As you don't need to alter or duplicate any logic and just need to wrap the router callable in that function. Mar 9, 2023 at 17:26
5

It seems you are using the no-misused-promises rule which states that you cannot return Promise<void> in a place where void is expected.

This means that you cannot return Promise<void> from your Express handler because the return type of RequestHandler from the library specifies that the return type should be void. I would suggest that you change it to return Promise<Response> by adding a simple return keyword:

import { getConnection } from 'typeorm';
import express from 'express';
const router = express.Router();

const resetDatabase = async (): Promise<void> => {
  const connection = getConnection();
  await connection.dropDatabase();
  await connection.synchronize();
};

// typescript-eslint throws an error in the following route:
router.post('/reset', async (_request, response) => {
  await resetTestDatabase();
  return response.status(204).send();  // <----- return added here
});

export default router;

The other option would be to avoid using async/await:

router.post('/reset', (_request, response) => {
  resetDatabase().then(() => response.status(204).send());
});
7
  • 1
    Thank you! The second solution works, but adding the return to the first one keeps throwing the error, it really feels like eslint does not like that async. The rule is indeed no-misused-promises, forgot to mention it. Any idea of what might be happening with async await? I'm actually trying to get rid of .then()s for consistency =) Apr 15, 2021 at 20:14
  • 8
    When you add async to a function, it automatically makes the return type a Promise. If you were to return nothing as you do in your async function, the return type is Promise<void> instead of just void. Honestly, I'm not sure that linting rule is worth it so I would be tempted to disable it. Apr 15, 2021 at 20:39
  • 1
    Maybe you can try adding a type annotation to your handler. Like async (_request, response): Promise<express.Response> => { Apr 15, 2021 at 20:41
  • 2
    His majesty doesn't like it. There is only so much time one can spend trying to appease Typescripot :P I'll just leave the then(), thanks again mate! Apr 15, 2021 at 21:31
  • 2
    Is there any way to solve this without then()?
    – Rouz
    May 27, 2021 at 13:42

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