837

I got an array (see below for one object in the array) that I need to sort by firstname using JavaScript. How can I do it?

var user = {
   bio: null,
   email:  "user@domain.com",
   firstname: "Anna",
   id: 318,
   lastAvatar: null,
   lastMessage: null,
   lastname: "Nickson",
   nickname: "anny"
};
0

23 Answers 23

1279

Suppose you have an array users. You may use users.sort and pass a function that takes two arguments and compare them (comparator)

It should return

  • something negative if first argument is less than second (should be placed before the second in resulting array)
  • something positive if first argument is greater (should be placed after second one)
  • 0 if those two elements are equal.

In our case if two elements are a and b we want to compare a.firstname and b.firstname

Example:

users.sort(function(a, b){
    if(a.firstname < b.firstname) { return -1; }
    if(a.firstname > b.firstname) { return 1; }
    return 0;
})

This code is going to work with any type.

Note that in "real life"™ you often want to ignore case, correctly sort diacritics, weird symbols like ß, etc when you compare strings, so you may want to use localeCompare. See other answers for clarity.

20
  • 5
    Friggin awesome... I'm sorting a nodelist by id...works like a charm. Thx a ton! – Cody Nov 16 '12 at 16:49
  • 82
    For those coming in at a later date, Mrchief's answer is better because it's case insensitive. – mlienau Apr 1 '13 at 14:19
  • 25
    @mlienau, I wouldn't call it better or worse. It's just another – RiaD Apr 9 '13 at 20:58
  • 20
    @RiaD fair enough. Just can't think of many cases of sorting items alphabetically including casing, where 'Zebra' appears in the list before 'apple', would be very useful. – mlienau Apr 9 '13 at 22:00
  • 19
    This code will only work on english speaking countries. In other countries you should be using ovunccetin's answer with localeCompare. – Spoike Jul 6 '13 at 5:47
968

Shortest possible code with ES6!

users.sort((a, b) => a.firstname.localeCompare(b.firstname))

String.prototype.localeCompare() basic support is universal!

31
  • 54
    By far the best answer if you are living in 2017 – nathanbirrell Dec 11 '17 at 22:38
  • 78
    Best answer also if you live in 2018 ;) – Simone Jan 23 '18 at 9:34
  • 71
    Probably gonna be the best answer for 2019 too. – Ahmad Maleki Jan 24 '18 at 13:36
  • 54
    2020 maybe? or naaa? – kspearrin Jan 26 '18 at 22:40
  • 72
    ah man, in 2030 the earth floods and this only works in the mountains . – Starfs Sep 20 '19 at 20:54
366

Something like this:

array.sort(function(a, b){
 var nameA=a.name.toLowerCase(), nameB=b.name.toLowerCase();
 if (nameA < nameB) //sort string ascending
  return -1;
 if (nameA > nameB)
  return 1;
 return 0; //default return value (no sorting)
});
7
  • 47
    When sorting strings 'toLowerCase()' is very important - capital letters could affect your sort. – MarzSocks Jan 9 '14 at 13:06
  • 4
    In case anyone else is wondering what the toLowerCase impacts, it's not much: 'a'>'A' //true 'z'>'a' //true 'A'>'z' //false – SimplGy Jan 14 '14 at 18:13
  • 16
    @SimplGy I'd argue that its impact is a bit more than you're giving it credit for. For instance, as stated in the comments to the accepted answer, it's important to know whether or not your sort function will sort the string 'Zebra' higher than the string 'apple', which it will do if you don't use the .toLowerCase(). – PrinceTyke Aug 4 '15 at 12:34
  • 1
    @PrinceTyke yeah that's a good case man. 'Z' < 'a' // true and 'z' < 'a' // false – SimplGy Aug 5 '15 at 14:59
  • 2
    All valid points and I'd say sorting is always a "it depends" kind of thing. If you're sorting by names, case sensitivity may not matter. In other cases it might. Regardless, I think adopting to one's specific situation is not hard once you get the core idea. – Mrchief Aug 5 '15 at 15:02
365

If compared strings contain unicode characters you can use localeCompare function of String class like the following:

users.sort(function(a,b){
    return a.firstname.localeCompare(b.firstname);
})
8
  • 3
    String.localeCompare isn't supports Safari and IE < 11 :) – CORSAIR Jun 11 '14 at 8:21
  • 13
    @CORSAIR it is supported, it is just the second and third parameter that aren't supported. – Codler Nov 25 '14 at 12:24
  • 6
    @CORSAIR the usage in the example is supported in all major IE browsers: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…. LocaleCompare also takes into account capitalization, so I think this implementation should be considered the best practice. – Matt Jensen Aug 17 '15 at 22:23
  • 10
    users.sort((a, b) => a.firstname.localeCompare(b.firstname)) // Short n sweet ES6 version! – Nachiketha Aug 7 '17 at 9:51
  • 4
    tanks bro. in ES6 use users.sort((a, b) => a.name.localeCompare(b.name)) – Mohmmad Ebrahimi Aval Oct 11 '18 at 15:50
40

Nice little ES6 one liner:

users.sort((a, b) => a.firstname !== b.firstname ? a.firstname < b.firstname ? -1 : 1 : 0);
3
  • 2
    This one is incomplete since it doesn't handle equal values properly. – Karl-Johan Sjögren Feb 27 '17 at 5:58
  • 2
    Of course, thanks for spotting that, I have added a check for matching values – Sam Logan Feb 27 '17 at 6:06
  • 2
    not bad I guess if you really want it all on one line, nested ternaries get confusing for readability though – russter Sep 27 '19 at 15:37
35

We can use localeCompare but need to check the keys as well for falsey values

The code below will not work if one entry has missing lname.

obj.sort((a, b) => a.lname.localeCompare(b.lname))

So we need to check for falsey value like below

let obj=[
{name:'john',lname:'doe',address:'Alaska'},
{name:'tom',lname:'hopes',address:'California'},
{name:'harry',address:'Texas'}
]
let field='lname';
console.log(obj.sort((a, b) => (a[field] || "").toString().localeCompare((b[field] || "").toString())));

OR

we can use lodash , its very simple. It will detect the returned values i.e whether number or string and do sorting accordingly .

import sortBy from 'lodash/sortBy';
sortBy(obj,'name')

https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.5#sortBy

1
  • 2
    Lodash is pretty neat! Hadn't heard of it before. Works great! – Derk Jan Speelman Aug 27 '19 at 9:44
21

underscorejs offers the very nice _.sortBy function:

_.sortBy([{a:1},{a:3},{a:2}], "a")

or you can use a custom sort function:

_.sortBy([{a:"b"},{a:"c"},{a:"a"}], function(i) {return i.a.toLowerCase()})
1
  • 2
    the second example involves returning strings. Does sortBy detect the returned values are strings and thus performs an alphabetical sorting? Thanks – superjos Nov 10 '14 at 21:01
17

In case we are sorting names or something with special characters, like ñ or áéíóú (commons in Spanish) we could use the params locales (es for spanish in this case ) and options like this:

let user = [{'firstname': 'Az'},{'firstname': 'Áb'},{'firstname':'ay'},{'firstname': 'Ña'},{'firstname': 'Nz'},{'firstname': 'ny'}];


user.sort((a, b) => a.firstname.localeCompare(b.firstname, 'es', {sensitivity: 'base'}))


console.log(user)

The oficial locale options could be found here in iana, es (spanish), de (German), fr (French). About sensitivity base means:

Only strings that differ in base letters compare as unequal. Examples: a ≠ b, a = á, a = A.

17

A more compact notation:

user.sort(function(a, b){
    return a.firstname === b.firstname ? 0 : a.firstname < b.firstname ? -1 : 1;
})
2
  • it's more compact but violates its contract: sign(f(a, b)) =-sign(f(b, a)) (for a = b) – RiaD Oct 30 '14 at 9:09
  • 3
    return a.firstname == b.firstname should use === for completeness – puiu Nov 4 '15 at 20:03
10

Inspired from this answer,

users.sort((a,b) => (a.firstname  - b.firstname));
4
  • 1
    Wrong wrong wrong! You don't get a valid result if you subtract strings in Javascript. – xjcl Jul 13 '20 at 13:03
  • @xjcl did you run my code? This is working perfectly. jsfiddle.net/5uh34njg – Isuru Siriwardana Jul 15 '20 at 4:45
  • 1
    It's not working. The users are just output in the order of the input. Plus the field name you used there was firstname when it's actually name in your users object. – xjcl Jul 15 '20 at 12:56
  • 1
    This gives NaN unless firstname is a number – gildniy Nov 5 '20 at 23:25
9

Basically you can sort arrays with method sort, but if you want to sort objects then you have to pass function to sort method of array, so I will give you an example using your array

user = [{
bio: "<null>",
email: "user@domain.com",
firstname: 'Anna',
id: 318,
"last_avatar": "<null>",
"last_message": "<null>",
lastname: 'Nickson',
nickname: 'anny'
},
{
bio: "<null>",
email: "user@domain.com",
firstname: 'Senad',
id: 318,
"last_avatar": "<null>",
"last_message": "<null>",
lastname: 'Nickson',
nickname: 'anny'
},
{
bio: "<null>",
email: "user@domain.com",
firstname: 'Muhamed',
id: 318,
"last_avatar": "<null>",
"last_message": "<null>",
lastname: 'Nickson',
nickname: 'anny'
}];

var ar = user.sort(function(a, b)
{
  var nA = a.firstname.toLowerCase();
  var nB = b.firstname.toLowerCase();

  if(nA < nB)
    return -1;
  else if(nA > nB)
    return 1;
 return 0;
});
4
  • why return 0 at the end? – Aurelio Jun 30 '15 at 20:01
  • =, when strings are same – Senad Meškin Jul 2 '15 at 13:05
  • but in that case shouldn't the else be removed? Otherwise that return 0 will never be read – Aurelio Jul 2 '15 at 18:34
  • 3
    that is not "else", it's "else if" – Senad Meškin Jul 2 '15 at 19:48
7

try

users.sort((a,b)=> (a.firstname>b.firstname)*2-1)

var users = [
  { firstname: "Kate", id: 318, /*...*/ },
  { firstname: "Anna", id: 319, /*...*/ },
  { firstname: "Cristine", id: 317, /*...*/ },
]

console.log(users.sort((a,b)=> (a.firstname>b.firstname)*2-1) );

8
  • 3
    the sort function should return -1,0,1. this one only returns -1,1. – Radu Luncasu Jun 26 '19 at 10:02
  • @RaduLuncasu - can you provide test data (users array) which shows that above solution gives wrong result? (as far I know, missing zero is no problem) – Kamil Kiełczewski Jun 26 '19 at 10:05
  • If compareFunction(a, b) returns 0, leave a and b unchanged with respect to each other, but sorted with respect to all different elements. – Radu Luncasu Jun 27 '19 at 12:11
  • 1
    Why are you using an array of numbers ? Why not try : [{firstname: "anna", id:1}, {firstname: "anna", id:2}] and see how the lack of 0 for equality will change the sorting of the array for no reason ? – Radu Luncasu Jun 27 '19 at 12:47
6

also for both asec and desc sort, u can use this : suppose we have a variable SortType that specify ascending sort or descending sort you want:

 users.sort(function(a,b){
            return   sortType==="asc"? a.firstName.localeCompare( b.firstName): -( a.firstName.localeCompare(  b.firstName));
        })
6

A generalized function can be written like below

    function getSortedData(data, prop, isAsc) {
        return data.sort((a, b) => (a[prop] < b[prop] ? -1 : 1) * (isAsc ? 1 : -1));
   }

you can pass the below parameters

  1. The data which you want to sort
  2. The property in the data by it should be sorted
  3. The last parameter is of boolean type. It checks if you want to sort by ascending or by descending
5

I'm surprised no one mentioned Collators. You shouldn't use localeCompare unless you have to as it has significantly worse performance.

const collator = new Intl.Collator('zh-CN'); // Chinese Simplified for example

function sortAsc(a, b) {
  if (typeof a === 'string' && typeof b === 'string') {
    return collator.compare(b, a)
  }

  return b - a;
}

function sortDesc(a, b) {
  if (typeof a === 'string' && typeof b === 'string') {
    return collator.compare(a, b);
  }

  return a - b;
}
3

in simply words you can use this method

users.sort(function(a,b){return a.firstname < b.firstname ? -1 : 1});
3

You can use this for objects

transform(array: any[], field: string): any[] {
return array.sort((a, b) => a[field].toLowerCase() !== b[field].toLowerCase() ? a[field].toLowerCase() < b[field].toLowerCase() ? -1 : 1 : 0);}
2

Pushed the top answers into a prototype to sort by key.

Array.prototype.alphaSortByKey= function (key) {
    this.sort(function (a, b) {
        if (a[key] < b[key])
            return -1;
        if (a[key] > b[key])
            return 1;
        return 0;
    });
    return this;
};
2

Just for the record, if you want to have a named sort-function, the syntax is as follows:

let sortFunction = (a, b) => {
 if(a.firstname < b.firstname) { return -1; }
 if(a.firstname > b.firstname) { return 1; }
 return 0;
})
users.sort(sortFunction)

Note that the following does NOT work:

users.sort(sortFunction(a,b))
1

You can use the in-built array method - sort. This method takes a callback method as a param



    // custom sort function to be passed as param/callback to the Array's sort method
    function myCustomSort(a, b) {
        return (a.toLowerCase() > b.toLowerCase()) ? 1 : -1;
    }

    // Actual method to be called by entity that needs sorting feature
    function sortStrings() {
        var op = Array.prototype.sort.call(arguments, myCustomSort);
    }

    // Testing the implementation
    var sortedArray = sortStrings("Burger", "Mayo1", "Pizza", "boxes", "Apples", "Mayo");
    console.log(sortedArray); //["Apples", "boxes", "Burger", "Mayo", "Mayo1", "Pizza"]


Key Points to be noted for understanding this code.

  1. The custom method, in this case, myCustomSort, should return +1 or -1 for each element pair(from the input array) comparison.
  2. Use toLowerCase()/toUpperCase() in the custom sorting callback method so that case difference does not affect the correctness of the sorting process.

I hope this is clear enough explanation. Feel free to comment if you think, more info is needed.

Cheers!

2
  • Not a proper answer because it only performs less than and greater than checks and not the equal check. – Steel Brain Mar 14 '16 at 4:15
  • it also does not bring enything new to the table, compared to any of the answers that have been sitting there since ~2011. – amenthes Oct 16 '16 at 12:46
0

You can use something similar, to get rid of case sensitive

users.sort(function(a, b){

  //compare two values
  if(a.firstname.toLowerCase() < b.firstname.toLowerCase()) return -1;
  if(a.firstname.toLowerCase() > b.firstname.toLowerCase()) return 1;
  return 0;

})
1
  • 8
    Same answer as the one by Mrchief. With the further disadvantage that the toLowerCase is done four times per comparison instead of two times. – amenthes Oct 16 '16 at 12:43
0

My implementation, works great in older ES versions:

sortObject = function(data) {
    var keys = Object.keys(data);
    var result = {};

    keys.sort();

    for(var i = 0; i < keys.length; i++) {
        var key = keys[i];

        result[key] = data[key];
    }

    return result;
};
0

for a two factors sort (name and lastname):

users.sort((a, b) => a.name.toLowerCase() < b.name.toLowerCase() ? -1 : a.name.toLowerCase() > b.name.toLowerCase() ? 1 : a.lastname.toLowerCase() < b.lastname.toLowerCase() ? -1 : a.lastname.toLowerCase() > b.lastname.toLowerCase() ? 1 : 0)

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