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I've seen a lot of these google foobar challenges and really didn't think I would be invited. I want to ask about the first question. All in all the requirement is this:

'''Write a function called solution(data, n) that takes in a list of less than 100 integers and a
number n, and returns that same list but with all of the numbers that occur more than n times
removed entirely. The returned list should retain the same ordering as the original list - you 
don't want to mix up those carefully-planned shift rotations! For instance, if data was [5, 10,
15, 10, 7] and n was 1, solution(data, n) would return the list [5, 15, 7] because 10 occurs 
twice, and thus was removed from the list entirely.'''

And this is my code:

def solution(data, n):
    data_new = []
    if len(data) < 100:
        for d in data:
            if n <= 1:
                if data.count(d) > n:
                    pass
                elif data.count(d) == n:
                    data_new.append(d)
            elif n > 1:
                if data.count(d) >= n:
                    pass
                elif data.count(d) < n:
                    data_new.append(d)
    elif len(data) > 100:
        print('too much')
    print(data_new)

solution([1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5], 1)
output: 1,4

This works locally and whatever list I feed it, works as it should. But when I get it to verify it doesn't get the tests done. I sure can search online to find the answer, but it's not what I want. Where am I mistaken in the code?

EDIT This is reworked version of the above:

def solution(data, n):
    data_new = []
    if len(data) < 100:
        for d in data:
            if n <= 1:
                if data.count(d) > n:
                    pass
                elif data.count(d) <= n:
                    data_new.append(d)
            elif n > 1:
                if data.count(d) > n:
                    pass
                elif data.count(d) <= n:
                    data_new.append(d)
    return data_new
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    elif n > 1: -> if data.count(d) >= n: -> pass. So if n is 2, and a number occurs 2 times, you will skip it. But according to the problem, it would need to occur more than 2 times to be skipped. – Tom Dalton Apr 16 at 15:21
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    Make a list [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3]. Use n = 2. What do you think the output should be. What is your code's output? – Tom Dalton Apr 16 at 15:49
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    That looks right with the reworked code, I think your original code would have removed the 2's as well tho, which is what I'd have thought the problem is. – Tom Dalton Apr 16 at 16:12
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    It's possible the issue is with your elif len(data) > 100: print('too much') part. Might be worth removing that part entirely - the spec doesn't tell you what to do if you get more than 100 numbers, so I'd personally leave that out. – Tom Dalton Apr 16 at 16:14
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    "The returned list should..." You never return the result. Instead, you are just printing it out. – Code-Apprentice Apr 16 at 16:15
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Read the instructions carefully:

The returned list should...

You print out the resulting list, but you never return it.

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    :facepalm: :thumbsup: – Tom Dalton Apr 16 at 16:16
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    @TomDalton While printing is a good tool for debugging, exercises like this almost always expect you to return a value from your function. In fact, returning a value is good practice in general. You can print the value after you call the function. – Code-Apprentice Apr 16 at 16:16
  • Thanks guys the problem was exactly that. – T0ny1234 Apr 16 at 16:18
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    @T0ny1234 One reason it took so long for many of us to see this is that we commonly use the pattern where one function calculates the results and another function decides how to display the results. This follows the principle of "separation of concerns". – Code-Apprentice Apr 16 at 16:20
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    @TomDalton That last comment was intended for the OP, which I thought was you at the time I wrote it. – Code-Apprentice Apr 18 at 17:35
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I have attempted google foobar many times so i am writing this answer by experience. the problem with your code is that it returns answer as a list but answer should be 1,4 not [1,4] or something like that. I know this is late but this is my first answer(sorry for bad variable names).

def solution(data, n):
    lis=[]
    lis2=[]
    a=''
    for i in data:
        if i not in lis2 and data.count(i)<=n and n>0:
            lis2.append(str(i))
            lis2.append(',')
        else:
            lis.append(i)
            break
    for i in lis2:
       a+=i
    return a[:-1]

this function returns the correct output.

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  • Thnak you, the edited solution I posted passed all of the tests after I did return instead of print the values. – T0ny1234 Apr 23 at 7:49
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Why do you need to check if n <= 1 or n > 1? This should work the same:

    data_new = []
    for d in data:
        if data.count(d) <= n:
            data_new.append(d)
    return data_new
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Meanwhile I have no idea why this java solution failed even for the test case

data = {1,2,2,3,3,3,4,5,5};
n = 1;

In my local it gives absolutely correct answer. It should not be the import issue since there are two passed out of the 9 tests cases. Anyone has some idea?

public static int[] solution(int[] data, int n) {
        Map<Integer, Integer> freqmap = new HashMap();
        for(int d : data)
            freqmap.put(d, freqmap.getOrDefault(d, 0)+1);
        List<Integer> res = new ArrayList();
        for(int d : data)
        {
            if(freqmap.get(d) <= n)
                res.add(d);
        }
        return res.stream().mapToInt(i->i).toArray();
    }

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