1

I am trying to initiate an object with an array. Is there a way to do it with pointers or should i find another way to do this.

EDIT: I want to write this code with dynamic memory allocation, I know vector is better way to solve this.

#include <iostream>

template <class t>
class die {
private:
    int sideCount;
    t* valueOfSides;
public:
    die(int side, t arr[]) {
        sideCount = side;
        valueOfSides = (t*)malloc(side * sizeof(t));
        for (int counter; counter < side; counter++) {
            valueOfSides[counter] = val[counter];
        }
    }

    ~die() {
        free(valueOfSides);
    }
};

int main() {
    die<int> sixsided(6, {1,2,3,4,5,6});
} 
7
  • 3
    You should definitely find a different way to do this. Using malloc and free in pure C++ code will always result in a major disaster. In which textbook did you learn to use malloc and free in C++? That's C, and there is never a valid reason to use malloc and free in pure C++ code. – Sam Varshavchik Apr 17 at 2:33
  • I know std::vector is c++ way to declare arrays but I don't think this is the problem for now – RisenShadow Apr 17 at 2:36
  • 2
    Sure it is. Because if the parameter to the constructor was const std::vector<t> & (and the rest of the template class adjusted accordingly), then two things will immediately happen. 1) There wouldn't be any reason for the 2nd parameter to the constructor, explicitly giving the number of values, since this now can be trivially obtained from t.size(), and 2) die<int> sixsided({1,2,3,4,5,6}); would actually compile! I'm still curious which C++ textbook claims that the right way to do this is with malloc and free. – Sam Varshavchik Apr 17 at 2:40
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    Is this a C question or a C++ question? – Casey Apr 17 at 2:46
  • 3
    This has nothing to do with "dynamic memory allocation", but with the C++ syntax. One cannot deduce a pointer from a braced initialization list. The only context where anything remotely similar happens is with string literals, where "literal string" gets deduced to a const char [], which then decays to a const char *. – Sam Varshavchik Apr 17 at 2:48
-2

The C++ solution:


template <class t>
class die {
private:
    int sideCount;
    t* valueOfSides;
public:
    die(int side, t arr[]) {
        sideCount = side;
        valueOfSides = new T[side]
        for (int counter = 0; counter < side; counter++) { //always initialize variables
            valueOfSides[i] = arr[i];
        }
    }

    ~die() {
        delete[] valueOfSides;
    }
};

int main() {
    int arr[6] = { 1,2,3,4,5,6 };
    die<int> sixsided(6, arr);
}

The new operator is like malloc and the delete and delete[] operators are like free. They are dynamic allocators.

C solution:

template <class t>
class die {
private:
    int sideCount;
    t* valueOfSides;
public:
    die(int side, t arr[]) {
        sideCount = side;
        valueOfSides = (t*)malloc(side * sizeof(t));
        for (int counter = 0; counter < side; counter++) { //always initialize variables
            valueOfSides[i] = arr[i];
        }
    }

    ~die() {
        free(valueOfSides);
    }
};

int main() {
    int arr[6] = { 1,2,3,4,5,6 };
    die<int> sixsided(6, arr);
}

Note: in C the <iostream> header will not work, this is C++ only.

There are other containers, namely std::vector, that can work, but this is the solution for your answer.

4
  • 1
    Your C++ and C solutions both have 2 memory leaks, a double delete, and assumes the types are default-constructable and copy-assignable. – Mooing Duck Apr 17 at 3:10
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    @MooingDuck, Most of that is in the original code, I merely fixed the code to meet the Question. Where exactly are the memory leaks and the double delete? – Eduardo Maroto Campos Apr 17 at 3:14
  • lack of die::operator= causes a memory leak and double delete. There's also a second memory leak if t::operator= throws an exception. – Mooing Duck Apr 17 at 3:20
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    @MooingDuck, true, but that is in the original code, again. All I did was answer what the question asked. If a problem arises, OP can ask another question, right? correct me if I'm wrong and should edit my code – Eduardo Maroto Campos Apr 17 at 3:22
2

The right ways to do this would be

std::vector<t> valueOfSides;

template<size_t len> die(t (&arr)[len])
: valueOfSides(std::begin(arr), std::end(arr))
{}

or

std::vector<t> valueOfSides;

die(std::initializer_list<t> arr) : valueOfSides(arr) {}

I think. Though really, the best answer is

std::vector<t> valueOfSides;

die(std::vector<t> arr) : valueOfSides(std::move(arr)) {}

One should never use raw pointers to own memory in C++, and virtually never use new or malloc. As it is, you have undefined behavior in your code because of misusing malloc.


If you're absolutely insane, or doing homework, it can be done with raw pointers, though I doubt I can get it entirely right without tests and a compiler.

template<class t>
class die {
private:
    int sideCount;
    t* valueOfSides;
public:
    die(int side, t* arr) {
        sideCount = 0;
        std::size_t buffer_size = sizeof(t)*side;
        char* buffer;
        try {
            buffer = new char[side];
            valueOfSides = reinterpret_cast<t*>(buffer);
            for(int i=0; i<side; i++) {
                new(valueOfSides+i)t(arr[i]);
                sideCount++;
            }
        } catch(...) {
            for(int i=sideCount; i>=0; i--)
                (valueOfSides+i)->~t();
            delete[]buffer;
            throw;
        }
    }
    die& operator=(die&& rhs) {
        sideCount = rhs.sideCount;
        valueOfSides = rhs.valueOfSides;
        rhs.valueOfSides = nullptr;
        rhs.sideCount = 0;
        return *this;
    }
    //die& operator=(const die& rhs) not shown because its super hard.

    ~die() {
        for(int i=sideCount; i>=0; i--)
            (valueOfSides+i)->~t();
        delete[]reinterpret_cast<char*>(valueOfSides);
    }
};

As we've said before, getting this stuff right is crazy hard. Use a std::vector.

0
1

Use std::vector.

#include <iostream>
#include <initalizer_list>
#include <vector>

template<class T>
class die {
public:
    die() = default;
    die(std::initializer_list<T> list)
    : sides{list}
    { /* DO NOTHING */ }
private:
    std::vector<T> sides{};
};

int main() {
    die<int> sixsided({1,2,3,4,5,6});
} 
0
0

One way you can do this, using more of a C technique, is a variable argument list:

#include <cstdarg>
#include <iostream>

template <class t>
class die {
private:
    int sideCount;
    t* valueOfSides;
public:
    die(int side, ...) {
        sideCount = side;
        valueOfSides = new t[side];

        va_list args;
        va_start(args, side);
        for (int counter = 0; counter < side; counter++) {
            valueOfSides[counter] = va_arg(args, t);
        }
        va_end(args);
    }

    ~die() {
        delete[] valueOfSides;
    }
};

int main() {
    die<int> sixsided(6, 1,2,3,4,5,6);
}

Rather than passing an array, you're passing the parameters individually (i.e. no need for a temporary array) and using a va_list to access them.

Also, the calls to malloc and free were replaced with new and delete which is the C++ way of allocating and deallocating memory.

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