2

I have an Angular project that uses services that very often repeat themselves with the typical create/read/update/delete/read-list-of-all-entries. I also very often want to manipulate received data in similar ways after receiving it. So I wrote decorators that use apply which "transform" the data in a way determined by the parameter passed to them (the parameter is always an object class).

In normal use this looks like this:

//rule.service.ts
@Injectable({
  providedIn: 'root'
})
export class RuleService {

  rulesUrl: string = `${Constants.wikiApiUrl}/rule/`;

  constructor(private http: HttpClient) {}

  @TransformObservable(RuleObject)
  getRule(pk: number): Observable<Rule>{
    return this.http.get<Rule>(`${this.rulesUrl}/${pk}`);
  }
}

This happens a lot, so I want to write a parent-service that I can extend:

//generic-object.service.ts

@Injectable({
  providedIn: 'root'
})
export abstract class GenericObjectService{
  baseUrl: string;

  constructor(
    private http: HttpClient,
    public objectClass: any,
  ) {}

  @TransformObservable(this.objectClass) //This line won't work
  read(pk: number): Observable<any>{
    return this.http.get(`${this.baseUrl}/${pk}`);
  }
}

The issue is that I can't use "this" for a decorator parameter, it doesn't exist at the time of parsing IIRC. But is there a way I could pass the decorator-parameter to my injected service somehow so that it may be used by the decorator?

Find below also the "TransformObservable" decorator:

export function TransformObservable(modelClass: any){
    /**Decorator to apply transformObservableContent */
    return function(target: any, propertyKey: string, descriptor: PropertyDescriptor){

        const originalMethod = descriptor.value;
        descriptor.value = function(){
            const observable = originalMethod.apply(this, arguments);
            return transformObservableContent(observable, modelClass);
        }
        return descriptor;
    }
}

2 Answers 2

3

Based on @S.D. 's answer I finally understood what he was trying to say all along: You have access to this inside the anonymous function that you put into descriptor.value. So for my decorator to be able to properly do this, I must access modelClass from inside that anonymous function using this and I'm good to go. Here is what the solution from S.D. looks like put into practice:

export function TransformObservable(modelClass: any){
    /**Decorator to apply transformObservableContent */
    return function(target: any, propertyKey: string, descriptor: PropertyDescriptor){

        const originalMethod = descriptor.value;
        descriptor.value = function(){
            const observable = originalMethod.apply(this, arguments);

            //If the decorator argument was not a class but instead a property
            // name of a property on the object that uses the decorator that 
            // contains the class, update the modelClass variable
            const decoratorArgumentIsProperty = ["String", "string"].includes(typeof modelClass);
            if(decoratorArgumentIsTargetProperty){
                modelClass = this[modelClass];
            }

            return transformObservableContent(observable, modelClass);
        }
        return descriptor;
    }
}
2

The this keyword will not be available outside of function scopes. However, you may define the needed object as a field/property in same class and in the decorator annotation, you may just pass a string that decorator function will lookup, or pass in an actual object reference.

In the decorator, check the argument that was passed to the annotation:

if(typeof modelClass === 'string'){
  // lookup a property in decorated class definition
  modelClass = target[modelClass]; // or, this[modelClass]
}else {
  // assume modelClass is the needed object
}

This will allow you to use:

@TransformObservable('propertyName');
// or
@TransformObservable(someObjectReference);

Distinction between target and this:

The target passed to decorator function is the object that defines the class where the decorator is used. It will have all the properties and methods defined in the class and can be used to retrieve them as shown above. However target is not the runtime this you would generally use inside the class methods. Its only the replacement method (descriptor.value) that will have this available inside it, like original method.

Hence, if you really need this and not just the decorated class definition, you must move all the code inside the replacement function descriptor.value. There you have access to this as well as all the parameters that are passed to the decorator and the decorator factory.

5
  • Ohhh, so target = the object within which the decorator is written. "this" = ... I am actually not quite sure which context "this" inside of the decorator represents at that point. The child service that starts the call? Commented Apr 18, 2021 at 10:19
  • Could it be that the way you have edited to now is incorrect, I wrote my reply when this was still written as target (for future readers). this in TransformObservable is undefined, target does include an object that seems to be the object that the decorator is written inside of, aka GenericObjectService. However, for some reason the properties of GenericObjectService don't show up in that object, only the functions do. Commented Apr 18, 2021 at 12:15
  • @PhilippDoerner Updated in answer.
    – s.d
    Commented Apr 18, 2021 at 12:55
  • Ahh, I finally understood that the check for modelClass must happen in the anonymous function that I put into descriptor.value. For the errant reader I'll throw your suggestion put into practice as another solution below, but yours will stay the accepted answer. Commented Apr 18, 2021 at 14:59
  • @PhilippDoerner True. You have to move the code inside the replacement function and do the checks there, and you can use this there.
    – s.d
    Commented Apr 19, 2021 at 4:14

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