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I'm creating a java scraping program using selenium and inserting the data into a database. I'm actively looking to improve my skillset but I don't find instructional videos too helpful since I lose interest, but I really enjoy learning through doing. This code below works as needed, but it looks really really ugly and I feel there must be a better/cleaner solution. For reference it builds a comma separated string with data such as "Value1", or "Value1, Value2", etc depending on the keyword count. My original logic was outputting ", Value1, Value2" which is why I added the "if (x ==0)" logic. I have a lot of methods that are just sloppy like this, so any pointers for improving my code is appreciated, thanks!

    ArrayList<String> keywords = new ArrayList<String>();
keywords = keywordChecker(title);
        for (int x = 0; x < keywords.size(); x++) {
                    String list = keywords.get(x);
                    if (x == 0) {
                        keywordListBuilder = list;
                    } else if (x > 0) {
                        keywordListBuilder = keywordListBuilder + ", " + list;
                    }
                }
                keywordValues.add(keywordListBuilder);

    public ArrayList<String> keywordChecker(String title) {
        ArrayList<String> keywordList = new ArrayList<String>();
        String keyword1 = "";
        String keyword2 = "";
        String keyword3 = "";
        String[] keywordTextCombinations = { "Value1", "Value2", "Value3", [imagine a list of 20 items]};
        for (int i = 0; i < keywordTextCombinations.length; i++) {
            if (title.toLowerCase().contains(keywordTextCombinations[i].toLowerCase())) {
                keyword1 = keywordTextCombinations[i];
                keywordList.add(keyword1);
                break;
            }
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < keywordTextCombinations.length; i++) {
            if (title.toLowerCase().contains(keywordTextCombinations[i].toLowerCase())
                    && !keywordTextCombinations[i].toLowerCase().equals(keyword1.toLowerCase())
                    && !keywordTextCombinations[i].toLowerCase().equals(keyword2.toLowerCase())) {
                keyword2 = keywordTextCombinations[i];
                keywordList.add(keyword2);
                break;
            }
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < keywordTextCombinations.length; i++) {
            if (title.toLowerCase().contains(keywordTextCombinations[i].toLowerCase())
                    && !keywordTextCombinations[i].toLowerCase().equals(keyword1.toLowerCase())
                    && !keywordTextCombinations[i].toLowerCase().equals(keyword2.toLowerCase())) {
                keyword3 = keywordTextCombinations[i];
                keywordList.add(keyword3);
                break;
            }
        }
        return keywordList;
    }
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  • Stack Overflow is for questions about malfunctioning code. Since this appears to be working code, this is a great fit for codereview.stackexchange.com. – Greg Burghardt Apr 19 at 22:44
  • You would need to provide more of the code though. Perhaps the entire method rather than part of it. – Greg Burghardt Apr 19 at 22:45
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ArrayList<String> keywords = new ArrayList<String>();
keywords = keywordChecker(title);

This will:

  1. Create a new variable, named keywords, that can point at arraylists.
  2. Makes a new arraylist object.
  3. Assigns the reference to this newly created object to the keywords variable.
  4. Then tosses that reference away and makes that created object instant garbage, as you then immediately assign some other reference to it.

In other words, that new ArrayList<String>(); does nothing whatsoever but waste time and space. Get rid of it. Let's also be like other java coders and use the most general type that we're interested in. For beginners, that basically means, 'the variable should be of type List, not ArrayList. It's good to write code in similar style to other java coders; makes it easier to read their code and it makes it easier for them to read your code.

List<String> keywords = keywordChecker(title);

for (int x = 0; x < keywords.size(); x++) {
  String list = keywords.get(x);
  if (x == 0) {
    keywordListBuilder = list;
  } else if (x > 0) {
    keywordListBuilder = keywordListBuilder + ", " + list;
  }
}
keywordValues.add(keywordListBuilder);

You're getting a single keyword and you call this list? Names are important. When they lie, your code becomes unreadable.

You're turning a list of strings into a single string with all the values, separated by a comma. That sounds like a common job. When something sounds common enough, search the web. You'll usually find that there's a one-liner. So it is here:

keywordValues.add(String.join(", ", keywords));

Oof, that's way less code.


The keywordChecker method

It helps to document code, especially when asking for help. Evidently, this method is to scan the provided title variable, and search for any of a list of keywords, then it is to return each matching keyword. However, you've limited to return at most 3. I assume you didn't want that. But if you do, I'll show you how, with a one-liner of course.

String keyword1 = "";
String keyword2 = "";
String keyword3 = "";

When you start naming variables like this, stop. There's no way that's correct. Think for a moment. You're already using them, you know how to do this properly: Lists. Once you use a list, this becomes near trivial. Also, method names should generally be a verb; common java style. Let's also make constants, well, constant. Let's also avoid arrays, they are unwieldy and annoying.

private static final List<String> KEYWORDS = List.of("Value1", "Value2", "Value3", [imagine a list of 20 items]);

public List<String> findMatchingKeywords(String title) {
    var out = new ArrayList<String>();
    String lowercased = title.toLowerCase();
    for (String keyword : KEYWORDS) {
      if (lowercased.contains(keyword.toLowerCase()) out.add(keyword);
    }
    return out;
}

That eliminated a ton of lines, that's nice. If you want to return no more than 3 keywords at most... all you need to do is abort looping when you're 'full'. As last line within the for loop:

if (out.length() == 3) break;

Putting it all together:

keywordValues.add(String.join(", ", findMatchingKeywords(title)));

...


private static final List<String> KEYWORDS = List.of("Value1", "Value2", "Value3", [imagine a list of 20 items]);

public List<String> findMatchingKeywords(String title) {
  var out = new ArrayList<String>();
  String lowercased = title.toLowerCase();
  for (String keyword : KEYWORDS) {
    if (lowercased.contains(keyword.toLowerCase()) {
      out.add(keyword);
      if (out.length() == 3) break;
    }
  }
  return out;
}
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You can try to do everything in one for loop. Also, I recommend that you use a HashSet since you are comparing elements. A HashSet cannot contain duplicate elements, so if you try to add an element that already exists it doesn't do it and it returns false (Yes, the add function in HashSet returns a boolean).

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