2

I am teaching myself c++ by doing a series of exercises. I liked the idea of working out how hash tables could be done using just the language and no std calls. I discovered that you cant do "class member function partial template specialisation" and so worked on options for how this would be achieved. The code below is a stripped down version of the useful parts of a hash table. Leaving just enough to show the structure of what is needed.

Is there a better way to construct the class - IE a better idiom to solve partial specialisation?

I have tried full class specialisation and struct partial template specialisation but this seems the best so far.

I would be interested in comments about other ways to call the members and fuctions. I have thought of:

  1. A 'using' line for all the members/function in the fuctions.
  2. One 'using' line to create a typedef that can be used as the prefix.
  3. Putting the full cast at each use.
#include "stdio.h"

template <typename K, typename H>
class hash_table_common {
public:
    H& hash_type()                          // Standard CRTP helper function
    {
        return static_cast<H&>(*this);
    }
    int& operator[](K key)
    {
        return hash_type().get_value(key);
    }
    size_t hash(int key)
    {
        return key % 10;
    }
    int m_storage[10]{ 0 };
};

template <typename K>
class hash_table : public hash_table_common<K, hash_table<K>> {
public:
    class hash_table_common<K, hash_table<K>>& hash_type()
    {
        return static_cast<hash_table_common<K, hash_table<K>>&>(*this);
    }
    int& get_value(K key)
    {
        int hashable = 3; // value_to_int(); Real code will go here, for this demo it works for one value!
        int index1 = hash_type().hash(hashable);
        return hash_type().m_storage[index1];
    }
};

template <>
class hash_table<const char*> : public hash_table_common<const char*, hash_table<const char*>> {
public:
    class hash_table_common<const char*, hash_table<const char*>>& hash_type()
    {
        return static_cast<hash_table_common<const char*, hash_table<const char*>>&>(*this);
    }
    int& get_value(const char* key)
    {
        int hash_as_int = (int)key[0];
        int index = hash_type().hash(hash_as_int);
        return hash_type().m_storage[index];
    }
};
#endif

int main() {
    class hash_table<const char*> a;
    class hash_table<float> b;
    a["word"] = 3;
    b[4.5f] = 14;
    printf("%d %d", a["word"], b[4.5f]);
    return 0;
}

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    int& operator=(int value) { return value; }; - You'll return a dangling reference here (and you shouldn't put ; after function definitions) – Ted Lyngmo Apr 22 at 21:19
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    imho its a bit too much code. The working code part could make a question for codereview.stackexchange.com while the non-working part is hidden behind the #ifdef and the error message should be in the question. – 463035818_is_not_a_number Apr 22 at 21:19
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    asking for "the most acceptable c++ styled .." is suspecitble to be opinion based. std::hash is "accepted", though I dont nkow if it is "most accepted" ;). I suggest to focus on either the general question in the title, a general question about hash or the specific error in the code, but not all at the same time. Often an answer to a focused question helps to see the bigger picture (+1 anyhow :) – 463035818_is_not_a_number Apr 22 at 21:30
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    int hash_as_int = *((int*)&key); well that's super undefined behavior. What if the Key is only 1 byte? – Mooing Duck Apr 22 at 21:40
2

First, lets consider your example of implementing a hashtable. I made some small modifications to your main:

int main() {    
    my_hash_table<const char*> c;
    my_hash_table<float> d;
    c["word"] = 3;
    d[4.5f] = 14;
    std::cout << c["word"] << " " << d[4.5f] << "\n";
}

Lets take this as test case that we want to pass.

Ignoring deficiencies of the implementation and only talking about design, this is what is needed to "pass the test" and have specializations for const char* and float:

#include <map>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename T>
struct my_hash {
    size_t operator()(const T& t){ return t;}
};
template <typename key_t,typename hash = my_hash<key_t>,typename value_t = int>
struct my_hash_table {
    std::map<size_t,value_t> table;
    value_t& operator[](key_t key){ return table[hash{}(key)]; }
};
template <>
struct my_hash<const char*> {
    size_t operator()(const char* t){ return t[0]; }
};
template <>
struct my_hash<float> {
    size_t operator()(const float& t) { return t*100; }
};

Don't get me wrong, but your code looks like you tried to squeeze everything into one class. Not everything related to a class must be inside the class' definition. Rather, the less there is in the definition of a class, the better. Functors are typically rather light-weight, they have an operator() (ie they can be called) and often thats it. You can easily add specializations for my_hash.

Also, inheritance has its place, but to be honest, I don't understand what purpose it serves in your code. Last, but not least you are mixing the hashing function with the container, but those are seperate concerns. A different container might use the same hashing function and you might want to use the same data structure with a different hash.

"Class member function partial template specialisation" isn't a thing. Though, that does not pose a problem per se. It's just a tool we do not have in our box. When you want member function of a class template to do something special depending on only one of the paramters, you can do that. Either as above, or C++17 introduced if constexpr :

template <typename A> struct foo { void operator()() {} };
template <> struct foo<int> { void operator()(){ std::cout << "A is int\n";}};

template <typename A,typename B>
struct bar {
    void do_something() {
        
        foo<A>{}();

        if constexpr (std::is_same_v<A,int>){
            std::cout << "A is int\n";
        }
    };
};

Live Example

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    Wow, what can I say. Lots to learn from this. I will take it away and see if I can change my code to match. I tried the struct approach as I liked that but I never got the syntax wrong. I was missing the typename hash = my_hash<key_t> and the hash{}. I take it I can call non-operator functions in the same way. Let me try stuff and get back to you. – StoneMonkeyMark Apr 24 at 18:56
  • Ignoring deficiencies of the implementation and only talking about design And thanks for understanding the key part of what I was asking. – StoneMonkeyMark Apr 24 at 18:58
  • I now see would not put several functions in the one struct. So it would be a functor per call. That will start to look a big messy with 4 or 5 fuctions as they all belong in the one specialisation. Especially with the ordering to get the declaration right. – StoneMonkeyMark Apr 24 at 19:05
  • OK so I am understanding it better and I dont think that is really an answer to the original question. Perhaps using a hash map is too distracting. The main goal was to get partial specialisation where both parts can use the functions and members of the other part. Sure you have solved the code but I am still not sure we are addressing the best replacement for the tool we do not have in our box. For this case I might be able to keep going and get a full hash map working using this (and I was doing so with my approaches, which I will now try yours) but I was side tracked by the main question. – StoneMonkeyMark Apr 24 at 19:46
  • @StoneMonkeyMark the thing is that there is no exact replacement for the feature you miss (if there would be an exact replacement, it would be no replacement, but just the feature). You have to consider the problem at hand and choose a different solution. I admit that already while writing I was afraid that I didnt completely understand the actual problem you are trying to solve – 463035818_is_not_a_number Apr 24 at 20:06
0

Using the struct approach from @largest this is another solution candidate for the best idiom for this use case. I think I still like the CRTP option due to its symetric way of calling the other parts functions and members. hash_type()

In the code below there must be better names for hash_table_functions amd table as these should be invisible redirections I want say _{} and _ but the underscore police will come after me (lol).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

template <typename key_t>
struct hash_table_struct;

template <typename key_t, typename hash_table_functions = hash_table_struct<key_t>>
class hash_table {
public:
    int& operator[](key_t key)
    {
        return hash_table_functions{}.get_value(*this, key);
    };
    size_t hash(uint32_t key)
    {
        return key % 10;
    }
    int m_storage[10];
};

template <typename key_t>
struct hash_table_struct {
    int& get_value(hash_table<key_t>& table, key_t key)
    {
        uint32_t hashable = (uint32_t)key;
        size_t index = table.hash(hashable);
        return table.m_storage[index];
    }
};

template <>
struct hash_table_struct<const char*> {
    int& get_value(hash_table<const char*>& table, const char* key)
    {
        uint32_t hashable = (uint32_t)key[0];
        size_t index = table.hash(hashable);
        return table.m_storage[index];
    }
};

#endif

int main() {
    class hash_table<const char*> a;
    class hash_table<float> b;
    a["word"] = 3;
    b[4.5f] = 14;
    printf("%d %d", a["word"], b[4.5f]);
    return 0;
}

2
  • as you are looking for idioms, you might be interested in policy based design. The "modern" prefix is a bit worn out in the context of C++, but even after 20 years the books is worth a read – 463035818_is_not_a_number Apr 24 at 22:00
  • actually it looks like the example on the wiki page is closer to what you were looking for than my answer, though I also would have to read more to understand it in details. – 463035818_is_not_a_number Apr 24 at 22:07
0

The constexpr version Which only works on C++17. Emululated is_same_v to keep to the original rules. This was useful as it taught me how that all works. This results in much cleaner and easier to read code.

// C++ 17 required
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

template<class type1, class type2>
struct is_same
{
    static constexpr bool _value = false;
    constexpr operator bool() const noexcept { return _value; }
};

template<class type1>
struct is_same<type1, type1>
{
    static constexpr bool _value = true;
    constexpr operator bool() const noexcept { return _value; }
};

template<class type1, class type2>
inline constexpr bool is_same_v = is_same<type1, type2>::_value;

template <typename key_t>
class hash_table {
public:
    int& operator[](key_t key)
    {
        return get_value(key);
    };
    size_t hash(int key)
    {
        return key % 10;
    }
    int m_storage[10]{ 0 };
    int& get_value(key_t key)
    {
        uint32_t hashable;
        if constexpr ( is_same_v<key_t, const char*> )
        {
            hashable = (uint32_t)key[0];
        }
        else
        {
            hashable = (uint32_t)key;
        }
        size_t index = hash(hashable);
        return m_storage[index];
    }
};

int main()
{
    class hash_table<const char*> a;
    class hash_table<float> b;
    a["word"] = 3;
    b[4.5f] = 14;
    printf("%d %d", a["word"], b[4.5f]);
    return 0;
}
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