0

Context

I'm currently implementing some form of A* algorithm. I decided to use boost's fibonacci heap as underlying priority queue.

My Graph is being built while the algorithm runs. As Vertex object I'm using:

class Vertex {
public:
    Vertex(double, double);
    double distance = std::numeric_limits<double>::max();
    double heuristic = 0;
    HeapData* fib;
    Vertex* predecessor = nullptr;
    std::vector<Edge*> adj;

    double euclideanDistanceTo(Vertex* v);
}

My Edge looks like:

class Edge {
public:
    Edge(Vertex*, double);
    Vertex* vertex = nullptr;
    double weight = 1;
}

In order to use boosts fibonacci heap, I've read that one should create a heap data object, which I did like that:

struct HeapData {
    Vertex* v;
    boost::heap::fibonacci_heap<HeapData>::handle_type handle;

    HeapData(Vertex* u) {
        v = u;
    }

    bool operator<(HeapData const& rhs) const {
        return rhs.v->distance + rhs.v->heuristic < v->distance + v->heuristic;
    }
};

Note, that I included the heuristic and the actual distance in the comparator to get the A* behaviour, I want.

My actual A* implementation looks like that:

    boost::heap::fibonacci_heap<HeapData> heap;

    HeapData fibs(startPoint);
    startPoint->distance = 0;
    startPoint->heuristic = getHeuristic(startPoint);
    auto handles = heap.push(fibs);
    (*handles).handle = handles;

    while (!heap.empty()) {
        HeapData u = heap.top();
        heap.pop();

        if (u.v->equals(endPoint)) {
            return;
        }

        doSomeGraphCreationStuff(u.v); // this only creates vertices and edges

        for (Edge* e : u.v->adj) {
            double newDistance = e->weight + u.v->distance;

            if (e->vertex->distance > newDistance) {

                e->vertex->distance = newDistance;
                e->vertex->predecessor = u.v;

                if (!e->vertex->fib) {
                    if (!u.v->equals(endPoint)) {
                        e->vertex->heuristic = getHeuristic(e->vertex);
                    }
                    e->vertex->fib = new HeapData(e->vertex);
                    e->vertex->fib->handle = heap.push(*(e->vertex->fib));
                }
                else {
                    heap.increase(e->vertex->fib->handle);
                }
            }
        }
    }

Problem

The algorithm runs just fine, if I use a very small heuristic (which degenerates A* to Dijkstra). If I introduce some stronger heuristic, however, the program throws an exepction stating: 0xC0000005: Access violation writing location 0x0000000000000000. in the unlink method of boosts circular_list_algorithm.hpp. For some reason, next and prev are null. This is a direct consequence of calling heap.pop(). Note that heap.pop() works fine for several times and does not crash immediately.

Question

What causes this problem and how can I fix it?

What I have tried

  • My first thought was that I accidentally called increase() even though distance + heuristic got bigger instead of smaller (according to the documentation, this can break stuff). This is not possible in my implementation, however, because I can only change a node if the distance got smaller. The heurisitic stays constant. I tried to use update() instead of increase() anyway, without success
  • I tried to set several break points to get a more detailed view, but my data set is huge and I fail to reproduce it with smaller sets.

Additional Information

  • Boost Version: 1.76.0
  • C++14
  • the increase function is indeed right (instead of a decrease function) since all boost heaps are implemented as max-heaps. We get a min-heap by reversing the comparator and using increase/decrease reversed
8
  • 3 hours, no answer, no comment other than this, no votes. Why? Imho, too much code and too much words. Simplify your question and you'll likely get better feedback.
    – Enlico
    Apr 23, 2021 at 18:30
  • @Enlico hard disagree. Days before first answer is normal in low-traffic high-expertise tags. Welcome to boost
    – sehe
    Apr 23, 2021 at 18:47
  • @Ahiru I do agree that the code is convoluted in many ways. The egregious (and unnecessary) violation of the Law Of Demeter (e.g. a beautiful self-referential deep-nested mess like e->vertex->fib->handle = heap.push(*(e->vertex->fib))) is just asking for trouble. Also, the anti-pattern that everything is non-owning pointers in circular fashion (Edges refer to Vertex AND vice-versa, and HeapData refers to Verteix AND vice versa etc.). Make up your mind. Who owns what, tie the lifetime to that.
    – sehe
    Apr 23, 2021 at 19:07
  • That will make it a lot easier to reason about the code. Pointers have lifetimes, the handles too, and they have invalidation rules (see boost.2283326.n4.nabble.com/…, hopefully the docs have more on it, but I remember that using fibonacci heaps correctly was... tricky)
    – sehe
    Apr 23, 2021 at 19:07
  • If you show the task you're trying to achieve (perhaps complete with input format) I might give some hints on how I'd simplify the model (perhaps also increasing the performance by a potentially large factor, because lots of pointers are usually a sign of unnecessary dynamic allocation and reduced locality of reference).
    – sehe
    Apr 23, 2021 at 19:08

1 Answer 1

2

Okay, prepare for a ride.

  1. First I found a bug
  2. Next, I fully reviewed, refactored and simplified the code
  3. When the dust settled, I noticed a behaviour change that looked like a potential logic error in the code

1. The Bug

Like I commented at the question, the code complexity is high due to over-reliance on raw pointers without clear semantics.

While I was reviewing and refactoring the code, I found that this has, indeed, lead to a bug:

e->vertex->fib = new HeapData(e->vertex);
e->vertex->fib->handle = heap.push(*(e->vertex->fib));
  • In the first line you create a HeapData object. You make the fib member point to that object.
  • The second line inserts a copy of that object (meaning, it's a new object, with a different object identity, or practically speaking: a different address).

So, now

  • e->vertex->fib points to a (leaked) HeapData object that does not exist in the queue, and
  • the actual queued HeapData copy has a default-constructed handle member, which means that the handle wraps a null pointer. (Check boost::heap::detail::node_handle<> in detail/stable_heap.hpp to verify this).

This would handsomely explain the symptom you are seeing.

2. Refactor, Simplify

So, after understanding the code I have come to the conclusion that

  • HeapData and Vertex should to be merged: HeapData only served to link a handle to a Vertex, but you can already make the Vertex contain a Handle directly.

    As a consequence of this merge

    • your vertex queue now actually contains vertices, expressing intent of the code

    • you reduce all of the vertex access by one level of indirection (reducing Law Of Demeter violations)

    • you can write the push operation in one natural line, removing the room for your bug to crop up. Before:

       target->fib = new HeapData(target);
       target->fib->handle = heap.push(*(target->fib));
      

      After:

       target->fibhandle = heap.push(target);
      
  • Your Edge class doesn't actually model an edge, but rather an "adjacency" - the target part of the edge, with the weight attribute.

    I renamed it OutEdge for clarity and also changed the vector to contain values instead of dynamically allocated OutEdge instances.

    I can't tell from the code shown, but I can almost guarantee these were being leaked.

    Also, OutEdge is only 16 bytes on most platforms, so copying them will be fine, and adjacencies are by definition owned by their source vertex (because including/moving it to another source vertex would change the meaning of the adjacency).

    In fact, if you're serious about performance, you may want to use a boost::container::small_vector with a suitably chosen capacity if you know that e.g. the median number of edges is "small"

  • Your comparison can be "outsourced" to a function object

     using Node = Vertex*;
     struct PrioCompare {
         bool operator()(Node a, Node b) const;
     };
    

    After which the heap can be typed as:

     namespace bh = boost::heap;
     using Heap   = bh::fibonacci_heap<Node, bh::compare<PrioCompare>>;
     using Handle = Heap::handle_type;
    
  • Your cost function violated more Law-Of-Demeter, which was easily fixed by adding a Literate-Code accessor:

     Cost cost() const { return distance + heuristic; }
    
  • From quick inspection I think it would be more accurate to use infinite() over max() as initial distance. Also, use a constant for readability:

     static constexpr auto INF = std::numeric_limits<Cost>::infinity();
     Cost distance = INF;
    
  • You had a repeated check for xyz->equals(endPoint) to avoid updating the heuristic for a vertex. I suggest moving the update till after vertex dequeue, so the repetition can be gone (of both the check and the getHeuristic(...) call).

  • Like you said, we need to tread carefully around the increase/update fixup methods. As I read your code, the priority of a node is inversely related to the "cost" (cumulative edge-weight and heuristic values).

    Because Boost Heap heaps are max heaps this implies that increasing the priority should match decreasing cost. We can just assert this to detect any programmer error in debug builds:

     assert(target->cost() < previous_cost);
     heap.increase(target->fibhandle);
    

With these changes in place, the code can read a lot quieter:

Cost AStarSearch(Node start, Node destination) {
    Heap heap;

    start->distance  = 0;
    start->fibhandle = heap.push(start);

    while (!heap.empty()) {
        Node u = heap.top();
        heap.pop();

        if (u->equals(destination)) {
            return u->cost();
        }
        u->heuristic = getHeuristic(start);

        doSomeGraphCreationStuff(u);

        for (auto& [target, weight] : u->adj) {
            auto curDistance = weight + u->distance;

            // if cheaper route, queue or update queued
            if (curDistance < target->distance) {
                auto cost_prior     = target->cost();
                target->distance    = curDistance;
                target->predecessor = u;

                if (target->fibhandle == NOHANDLE) {
                    target->fibhandle = heap.push(target);
                } else {
                    assert(target->cost() < cost_prior);
                    heap.update(target->fibhandle);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return INF;
}

2(b) Live Demo

Adding some test data:

Live On Coliru

#include <boost/heap/fibonacci_heap.hpp>
#include <iostream>

using Cost = double;
struct Vertex;

Cost getHeuristic(Vertex const*) { return 0; }
void doSomeGraphCreationStuff(Vertex const*) {
    // this only creates vertices and edges
}

struct OutEdge { // adjacency from implied source vertex
    Vertex* target = nullptr;
    Cost    weight = 1;
};

namespace bh = boost::heap;
using Node   = Vertex*;
struct PrioCompare {
    bool operator()(Node a, Node b) const;
};
using Heap   = bh::fibonacci_heap<Node, bh::compare<PrioCompare>>;
using Handle = Heap::handle_type;
static const Handle   NOHANDLE{}; // for expressive comparisons
static constexpr auto INF = std::numeric_limits<Cost>::infinity();

struct Vertex {
    Vertex(Cost d = INF, Cost h = 0) : distance(d), heuristic(h) {}

    Cost    distance  = INF;
    Cost    heuristic = 0;
    Handle  fibhandle{};
    Vertex* predecessor = nullptr;

    std::vector<OutEdge> adj;

    Cost cost() const { return distance + heuristic; }
    Cost euclideanDistanceTo(Vertex* v);
    bool equals(Vertex const* u) const { return this == u; }
};

// Now Vertex is a complete type, implement comparison
bool PrioCompare::operator()(Node a, Node b) const {
    return a->cost() > b->cost();
}

Cost AStarSearch(Node start, Node destination) {
    Heap heap;

    start->distance  = 0;
    start->fibhandle = heap.push(start);

    while (!heap.empty()) {
        Node u = heap.top();
        heap.pop();

        if (u->equals(destination)) {
            return u->cost();
        }
        u->heuristic = getHeuristic(start);

        doSomeGraphCreationStuff(u);

        for (auto& [target, weight] : u->adj) {
            auto curDistance = weight + u->distance;

            // if cheaper route, queue or update queued
            if (curDistance < target->distance) {
                auto cost_prior     = target->cost();
                target->distance    = curDistance;
                target->predecessor = u;

                if (target->fibhandle == NOHANDLE) {
                    target->fibhandle = heap.push(target);
                } else {
                    assert(target->cost() < cost_prior);
                    heap.update(target->fibhandle);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return INF;
}

int main() {
    // a very very simple graph data structure with minimal helpers:
    std::vector<Vertex> graph(10);
    auto node = [&graph](int id)             { return &graph.at(id);       };
    auto id   = [&graph](Vertex const* node) { return node - graph.data(); };

    // defining 6 edges
    graph[0].adj = {{node(2), 1.5}, {node(3), 15}};
    graph[2].adj = {{node(4), 2.5}, {node(1), 5}};
    graph[1].adj = {{node(7), 0.5}};
    graph[7].adj = {{node(3), 0.5}};

    // do a search
    Node startPoint = node(0);
    Node endPoint   = node(7);

    Cost cost = AStarSearch(startPoint, endPoint);

    std::cout << "Overall cost: " << cost << ", reverse path: \n";
    for (Node node = endPoint; node != nullptr; node = node->predecessor) {
        std::cout << " - " << id(node) << " distance " << node->distance
                  << "\n";
    }
}

Prints

Overall cost: 7, reverse path: 
 - 7 distance 7
 - 1 distance 6.5
 - 2 distance 1.5
 - 0 distance 0

3. The Plot Twist: Lurking Logic Errors?

I felt uneasy about moving the getHeuristic() update around. I wondered whether I might have changed the meaning of the code, even though the control flow seemed to check out.

And then I realized that indeed the behaviour changed. It is subtle. At first I thought the the old behaviour was just problematic. So, let's analyze:

The source of the risk is an inconsistency in node visitation vs. queue prioritization.

  • When visiting nodes, the condition to see whether the target became "less distant" is expressed in terms of distance only.
  • However, the queue priority will be based on cost, which is different from distance in that it includes any heuristics.

The problem lurking there is that it is possible to write code that where the fact that distance decreases, NEED NOT guarantee that cost decreases.

Going back to the code, we can see that this narrowly avoided, because the getHeuristic update is only executed in the non-update path of the code.

In Conclusion

Understanding this made me realize that

  • the Vertex::heuristic field is intended merely as a "cached" version of the getHeuristic() function call
  • implying that that function is treated as if it is idempotent
  • that my version did change behaviour in that getHeuristic was now potentially executed more than once for the same vertex (if visited again via a cheaper path)

I would suggest to fix this by

  • renaming the heuristic field to cachedHeuristic
  • making an enqueue function to encapsulate the three steps for enqueuing a vertex:
  • simply omitting the endpoint check because it can at MOST eliminate a single invocation of getHeuristic for that node, probably not worth the added complexity
  • add a comment pointing out the subtlety of that code path
  • UPDATE as discovered in the comments, we also need the inverse operatione (dequeue) to symmtrically update handle so it reflects that the node is no longer in the queue...

It also drives home the usefulness of having the precondition assert added before invoking Heap::increase.

Final Listing

With the above changes

  • encapsulated into a Graph object, that

  • also reads the graph from input like:

     0   2   1.5
     0   3    15
     2   4   2.5
     2   1     5
     1   7   0.5
     7   3   0.5
    

    Where each line contains (source, target, weight).

  • A separate file can contain heuristic values for vertices index [0, ...), optionally newline-separated, e.g. "7 11 99 33 44 55"

  • and now returning the arrived-at node instead of its cost only

Live On Coliru

#include <boost/heap/fibonacci_heap.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <deque>
#include <fstream>

using Cost = double;
struct Vertex;

struct OutEdge { // adjacency from implied source vertex
    Vertex* target = nullptr;
    Cost    weight = 1;
};

namespace bh = boost::heap;
using Node   = Vertex*;
struct PrioCompare {
    bool operator()(Node a, Node b) const;
};
using MutableQueue   = bh::fibonacci_heap<Node, bh::compare<PrioCompare>>;
using Handle = MutableQueue::handle_type;
static const Handle   NOHANDLE{}; // for expressive comparisons
static constexpr auto INF = std::numeric_limits<Cost>::infinity();

struct Vertex {
    Vertex(Cost d = INF, Cost h = 0) : distance(d), cachedHeuristic(h) {}

    Cost    distance        = INF;
    Cost    cachedHeuristic = 0;
    Handle  handle{};
    Vertex* predecessor = nullptr;

    std::vector<OutEdge> adj;

    Cost cost() const { return distance + cachedHeuristic; }
    Cost euclideanDistanceTo(Vertex* v);
};

// Now Vertex is a complete type, implement comparison
bool PrioCompare::operator()(Node a, Node b) const {
    return a->cost() > b->cost();
}

class Graph {
    std::vector<Cost> _heuristics;

    Cost getHeuristic(Vertex* v) {
        size_t n = id(v);
        return n < _heuristics.size() ? _heuristics[n] : 0;
    }
    void doSomeGraphCreationStuff(Vertex const*) {
        // this only creates vertices and edges
    }

  public:
    Graph(std::string edgeFile, std::string heurFile) {
        {
            std::ifstream stream(heurFile);
            _heuristics.assign(std::istream_iterator<Cost>(stream), {});
            if (!stream.eof())
                throw std::runtime_error("Unexpected heuristics");
        }
        std::ifstream stream(edgeFile);

        size_t src, tgt;
        double weight;
        while (stream >> src >> tgt >> weight) {
            _nodes.resize(std::max({_nodes.size(), src + 1, tgt + 1}));
            _nodes[src].adj.push_back({node(tgt), weight});
        }

        if (!stream.eof())
            throw std::runtime_error("Unexpected input");
    }

    Node search(size_t from, size_t to) {
        assert(from < _nodes.size());
        assert(to < _nodes.size());
        return AStar(node(from), node(to));
    }

    size_t id(Node node) const {
        // ugh, this is just for "pretty output"...
        for (size_t i = 0; i < _nodes.size(); ++i) {
            if (node == &_nodes[i])
                return i;
        }
        throw std::out_of_range("id");
    };
    Node node(int id) { return &_nodes.at(id); };

  private:
    // simple graph data structure with minimal helpers:
    std::deque<Vertex> _nodes; // reference stable when growing at the back

    // search state
    MutableQueue _queue;

    void enqueue(Node n) {
        assert(n && (n->handle == NOHANDLE));
        // get heuristic before insertion!
        n->cachedHeuristic = getHeuristic(n);
        n->handle = _queue.push(n);
    }

    Node dequeue() {
        Node node = _queue.top();
        node->handle = NOHANDLE;
        _queue.pop();
        return node;
    }

    Node AStar(Node start, Node destination) {
        _queue.clear();

        start->distance = 0;
        enqueue(start);

        while (!_queue.empty()) {
            Node u = dequeue();

            if (u == destination) {
                return u;
            }

            doSomeGraphCreationStuff(u);

            for (auto& [target, weight] : u->adj) {
                auto curDistance = u->distance + weight;

                // if cheaper route, queue or update queued
                if (curDistance < target->distance) {
                    auto cost_prior     = target->cost();
                    target->distance    = curDistance;
                    target->predecessor = u;

                    if (target->handle == NOHANDLE) {
                        // also caches heuristic
                        enqueue(target);
                    } else {
                        // NOTE: avoid updating heuristic here, because it
                        // breaks the queue invariant if heuristic increased
                        // more than decrease in distance
                        assert(target->cost() < cost_prior);
                        _queue.increase(target->handle);
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return nullptr;
    }
};

int main() {
    Graph graph("input.txt", "heur.txt");

    Node arrival = graph.search(0, 7);

    std::cout << "reverse path: \n";
    for (Node n = arrival; n != nullptr; n = n->predecessor) {
        std::cout << " - " << graph.id(n) << " cost " << n->cost() << "\n";
    }
}

Again, printing the expected

reverse path: 
 - 7 cost 7
 - 1 cost 17.5
 - 2 cost 100.5
 - 0 cost 7

Note how the heuristics changed the cost, but not optimal path in this case.

16
  • Swatted two bugs from just reviewing my own answer. On some days this will make me feel like a bad programmer. However, long term I know this is what makes me a good programmer. Just don't ever think your code is fine :) Testing and reviewing makes it fine.
    – sehe
    Apr 24, 2021 at 1:47
  • Thank you for your suggestions! (cleaning up the pointer mess actually produced a speed up of 100% (: ) Unfortunately, the problem still persists with this code. I have generated an input that is similar to mine in your format and that breaks the code I apologize for not being able to provide a smaller input size. I hardly believe you are a bad programmer. You seem to be an actual expert programmer. I haven't have much interaction with people like you and I have learned a lot from just that one answer:)
    – Ahiru
    Apr 24, 2021 at 11:46
  • That's awesome. My PC doesn't care about the size of the input. Currently working on something else, but will give it a look later
    – sehe
    Apr 24, 2021 at 11:49
  • Interesting. Both sample files run cleanly (no ubsan/asan diagnostics) and in ~7s (with ubsan/asan disabled) and with the exact code from here coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/e0a47bc8ab0a5dac for me
    – sehe
    Apr 24, 2021 at 16:05
  • 1
    ooh wow, of course! This might happen, depending on the behaviour of the heuristic I should have thought of that! Thank you so much. Can you give me a small insight how you tackled the problem?
    – Ahiru
    Apr 24, 2021 at 19:44

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