12

I recently pushed a new container image to one of my GKE deployments and noticed that API latency went up and requests started returning 502's.

Looking at the logs I found that the container started crashing because of OOM:

Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 2774370 (main) total-vm:1801348kB, anon-rss:1043688kB, file-rss:12884kB, shmem-rss:0kB, UID:0 pgtables:2236kB oom_score_adj:980

Looking at the memory usage graph it didn't look like the pods were using more than 50MB of memory combined. My original resource requests were:

...
spec:
...
  template:
...
    spec:
...
      containers:
      - name: api-server
...
        resources:
          # You must specify requests for CPU to autoscale
          # based on CPU utilization
          requests:
            cpu: "150m"
            memory: "80Mi"
          limits:
            cpu: "1"
            memory: "1024Mi"
      - name: cloud-sql-proxy
        # It is recommended to use the latest version of the Cloud SQL proxy
        # Make sure to update on a regular schedule!
        image: gcr.io/cloudsql-docker/gce-proxy:1.17
        resources:
          # You must specify requests for CPU to autoscale
          # based on CPU utilization
          requests:
            cpu: "100m"
...

Then I tried bumping the request for API server to 1GB but it did not help. In the end, what helped was reverting the container image to the previous version:

enter image description here

Looking through the changes in the golang binary there are no obvious memory leaks. When I run it locally it uses at most 80MB of memory, even under load from the same requests as in production.

And the above graph which I got from the GKE console also shows the pod using far less than the 1GB memory limit.

So my question is: What could cause GKE to kill my process for OOM when both GKE monitoring and running it locally only uses 80MB out of the 1GB limit?

=== EDIT ===

enter image description here

Adding another graph of the same outage. This time splitting the two containers in the pod. If I understand correctly, the metric here is non-evictable container/memory/used_bytes:

container/memory/used_bytes GA
Memory usage
GAUGE, INT64, By
k8s_container   Memory usage in bytes. Sampled every 60 seconds.
memory_type: Either `evictable` or `non-evictable`. Evictable memory is memory that can be easily reclaimed by the kernel, while non-evictable memory cannot.

Edit Apr 26 2021

I tried updating the resources field in the deployment yaml to 1GB RAM requested and 1GB RAM limit like suggested by Paul and Ryan:

        resources:
          # You must specify requests for CPU to autoscale
          # based on CPU utilization
          requests:
            cpu: "150m"
            memory: "1024Mi"
          limits:
            cpu: "1"
            memory: "1024Mi"

Unfortunately it had the same result after updating with kubectl apply -f api_server_deployment.yaml:

{
 insertId: "yyq7u3g2sy7f00"  
 jsonPayload: {
  apiVersion: "v1"   
  eventTime: null   
  involvedObject: {
   kind: "Node"    
   name: "gke-api-us-central-1-e2-highcpu-4-nod-dfe5c3a6-c0jy"    
   uid: "gke-api-us-central-1-e2-highcpu-4-nod-dfe5c3a6-c0jy"    
  }
  kind: "Event"   
  message: "Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 1707107 (main) total-vm:1801412kB, anon-rss:1043284kB, file-rss:9732kB, shmem-rss:0kB, UID:0 pgtables:2224kB oom_score_adj:741"   
  metadata: {
   creationTimestamp: "2021-04-26T23:13:13Z"    
   managedFields: [
    0: {
     apiVersion: "v1"      
     fieldsType: "FieldsV1"      
     fieldsV1: {
      f:count: {
      }
      f:firstTimestamp: {
      }
      f:involvedObject: {
       f:kind: {
       }
       f:name: {
       }
       f:uid: {
       }
      }
      f:lastTimestamp: {
      }
      f:message: {
      }
      f:reason: {
      }
      f:source: {
       f:component: {
       }
       f:host: {
       }
      }
      f:type: {
      }
     }
     manager: "node-problem-detector"      
     operation: "Update"      
     time: "2021-04-26T23:13:13Z"      
    }
   ]
   name: "gke-api-us-central-1-e2-highcpu-4-nod-dfe5c3a6-c0jy.16798b61e3b76ec7"    
   namespace: "default"    
   resourceVersion: "156359"    
   selfLink: "/api/v1/namespaces/default/events/gke-api-us-central-1-e2-highcpu-4-nod-dfe5c3a6-c0jy.16798b61e3b76ec7"    
   uid: "da2ad319-3f86-4ec7-8467-e7523c9eff1c"    
  }
  reason: "OOMKilling"   
  reportingComponent: ""   
  reportingInstance: ""   
  source: {
   component: "kernel-monitor"    
   host: "gke-api-us-central-1-e2-highcpu-4-nod-dfe5c3a6-c0jy"    
  }
  type: "Warning"   
 }
 logName: "projects/questions-279902/logs/events"  
 receiveTimestamp: "2021-04-26T23:13:16.918764734Z"  
 resource: {
  labels: {
   cluster_name: "api-us-central-1"    
   location: "us-central1-a"    
   node_name: "gke-api-us-central-1-e2-highcpu-4-nod-dfe5c3a6-c0jy"    
   project_id: "questions-279902"    
  }
  type: "k8s_node"   
 }
 severity: "WARNING"  
 timestamp: "2021-04-26T23:13:13Z"  
}

Kubernetes seems to have almost immediately killed the container for using 1GB of memory. But again, the metrics show that container using only 2MB of memory:

enter image description here

And again I am stumped because even under load this binary does not use more than 80MB when I run it locally.

I also tried running go tool pprof <url>/debug/pprof/heap. It showed several different values as Kubernetes kept thrashing the container. But none higher than ~20MB and not memory usage out of the ordinary

Edit 04/27

I tried setting request=limit for both containers in the pod:

 requests:
   cpu: "1"
   memory: "1024Mi"
 limits:
   cpu: "1"
   memory: "1024Mi"
...
requests:
  cpu: "100m"
  memory: "200Mi"
limits:
  cpu: "100m"
  memory: "200Mi"

But it didn't work either:

Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 2662217 (main) total-vm:1800900kB, anon-rss:1042888kB, file-rss:10384kB, shmem-rss:0kB, UID:0 pgtables:2224kB oom_score_adj:-998

And the memory metrics still show usage in the single digit MBs.

Update 04/30

I pinpointed the change that seemed to cause this issue by painstakingly checking out my latest commits one by one.

In the offending commit I had a couple of lines like

type Pic struct {
        image.Image
        Proto *pb.Image
}
...

pic.Image = picture.Resize(pic, sz.Height, sz.Width)
...

Where picture.Resize eventually calls resize.Resize. I changed it to:

type Pic struct {
        Img   image.Image
        Proto *pb.Image
 }
...
pic.Img = picture.Resize(pic.Img, sz.Height, sz.Width)

This solves my immediate problem and the container runs fine now. But it does not answer my original question:

  1. Why did these lines cause GKE to OOM my container?
  2. And why did the GKE memory metrics show that everything was fine?
5
  • 3
    Maybe temporary allocation of large chunks? Apr 23, 2021 at 16:32
  • @BurakSerdar I guess it is possible even though I have a hard time seeing why Go would allocate over 1GB of memory, up from 50MB. How "temporary" would an allocation have to be to not show up in the Memory graph? Apr 23, 2021 at 18:50
  • What is the memory graph showing? Total amount of allocated memory reported by runtime, or total amount of OS memory? If it is OS memory, you are right, and it should show up in the graph. If it is the measurement of actively allocated memory reported by runtime, then alloc and free of a 500M data would explain it. Apr 23, 2021 at 19:01
  • If I understand correctly it shows the OS memory. I added a link to a more detailed graph and the definition of the metric. I guess one possibility is that it somehow allocated 1GB of memory in-between the 60s sampling frequency. Very odd that it would not do that when I run the binary locally though Apr 23, 2021 at 19:20
  • If it is OS memory, it would show. Runtime does not return the OS memory even after you free it. Apr 23, 2021 at 19:32

3 Answers 3

5

I guess it was caused by Pod QoS class

When the system is overcommitted, the QoS classes determine which pod gets killed first so the freed resources can be given to higher priority pods.

In your case, the QoS of your pod would be Burstable

Each running process has an OutOfMemory(OOM) score. The system selects the process to kill by comparing OOM score of all the running processes. When memory needs to be freed, the process with the highest score gets killed. For details of how the score is calculated please refer to How is kernel oom score calculated?.

Which pod will be killed first if both in the Burstable class?

For short, the system will kill the one using more of its requested memory than the other in percentage-wise.

Pod A

used: 90Mi
requests: 100Mi
limits: 200Mi
Pod B

used: 150Mi
requests: 200Mi
limits: 400Mi

Pod A will get killed before Pod B because it uses 90% of its requested memory while Pod B use only 75% of its requested memory.

10
  • Thank you for your answer. I tried to redeploy with the memory request and limit both set to 1 GB. Unfortunately I got the same result. On the one hand Kubernetes kills my container for using >1GB of memory. On the other hand Kubernetes metrics shows the same container only using a few MB of memory. And when I run the binary locally I see no signs of memory leaks even under load Apr 26, 2021 at 23:42
  • @JohanWikström Do you set the resources of requests to limits for every container or only one container? You could get the pod's QoS class by kubectl get pod -o custom-columns=NAME:.metadata.name,qosClass:.status.qosClass
    – Paul
    Apr 27, 2021 at 3:09
  • I get api-server-deployment-777f5c596d-4n7hm Burstable when doing that. I only set the RAM request to the limit for the api-server container, not the cloud-sql-proxy. For the cloud sql proxy I haven't set any RAM requests or limits. I could try to set requests and limit for the second container tomorrow as well even though I suspect it won't help. Since Kubernetes only kills the api-server container for OOM Apr 27, 2021 at 5:31
  • You must set every container in your deployment to make the pod be Guaranteed . First let your pod be Guaranteed, then we could observe the reaction.
    – Paul
    Apr 27, 2021 at 5:43
  • Thank you for the tip. I tried that, but still no improvement. See 04/27 the update to my question. This is truly a mystery Apr 30, 2021 at 14:18
3

Ensuring a QoS class of "guaranteed" won't help in your scenario. One of your processes causes the parent cgroup to go over its memory limit - in turn set by the memory limit value you specify against the respective container - and the OOM killer terminates it. It's not a pod eviction as you clearly see the trademark message of the OOM killer in the logs. The scenario where a "guaranteed" QoS class would help if another pod allocates so much memory that brings the node under memory pressure - and in that case your "guaranteed" pod will be spared. But in your case, the Kubelet never gets a word in all this - as in deciding to evict the pod altogether - as the OOM killer acts faster.

Burak Serdar has a good point in its comments - temporary allocations of large memory chunks. Which could very well be the case, given that the resolution of collecting data is 60s in your case from the messages you pasted. That's a lot of time. One can easily fill GB of RAM in less than 1s. My assumption is that the memory "spikes" never get rendered as the metrics never get collected in time (even if you'd query cAdvisor directly it would be tricky since it has a resolution of 10-15 seconds for collecting its metrics).

How to see more about what goes on? A couple of ideas:

  • There are tools that show how much an application actually allocates, down to the framework level. In .NET dotMemory is a commonly used tool that can run inside a container and capture what goes on. There is probably an equivalent for Go. The problem with this approach is that when the container gets OOMKilled, the tool gets taken down with it
  • Write details around memory usage from within your own app. Here you'll find a movie that captures a process allocating memory until its parent container got OOM killed. The respective .NET app writes from time to time to the console the quantity of memory it uses, which the Kubernetes logs show even after the container is no longer, thus allowing to see what happened
  • Throttle the app so that it processes a small amount of data (e.g. temporarily look at what happens from a memory standpoint if you process just 1 picture per minute)
  • Look at the detailed OOM killer kernel logs to see all the processes in the cgroup. It's perfectly valid to have multiple processes inside a container (as in other processes aside the one with PID 1 in that container) and the OOM killer could very well kill any one of them. You can stumble upon unexpected twists in this case. Yet in your scenario it's the main process that appears to be terminated, otherwise the container wouldn't have gotten OOMkilled, so this scenario is unlikely.

Just for completeness sake: the underlying framework can enforce lower limits than the memory limit for your container(s). E.g. in .NET this is 75% when running in a container with a memory limit. In other words a .NET app allocating memory inside a container with a 2,000 MiB limit will error out at 1,500 MiB. Yet in that case you get an exit code of 139 (SIGSEGV). This doesn't appear to apply here, since the OOM killer terminates the process, and it's clearly visible from the Kernel logs that all the 1 GiB is actually used (anon-rss:1043688kB). To my knowledge Go doesn't have a similar setting yet, although the community has repeatedly asked for it.

1
  • I marked this as correct since it provides a detailed answer to the second part of my question (why don't the metrics show) and provides an approach to solve the first part. Indeed I did try to use go tool pprof to read the memory profile from the live server, but it showed all normal until the server died and took the tool with it. If I ever encounter this again I would have to manually use runtime/metrics or runtime/pprof to print memory stats to the kubernetes logs. Feb 21, 2022 at 23:45
2

The resource spec here is the root cause for the OOM.

In Kubernetes, required and limited memory are defined differently. Required memory is the memory must-have. Limited memory is the memory that the container can be bursted into. But limited memory does not guarantee that the container can have that resources.

In most of the production systems, it is not recommended that the limited and required resource differ too much. For example, in your case,

requests:
  cpu: "150m"
  memory: "80Mi"
limits:
  cpu: "1"
  memory: "1024Mi"

The container can only have 80Mi guaranteed memory but it can somehow burst into 1024Mi. The node may not have enough memory for the container and container itself will go into OOM.

So, if you want to improve this situation, you need to configure the resource to be something like this.

requests:
  cpu: "150m"
  memory: "1024Mi"
limits:
  cpu: "1"
  memory: "1024Mi"

Please note that CPU is just fine because you won't get the process killed under low CPU time. But the OOM will lead to the process killed.

As the answer above mentioned, this is related to the quality of service in the pod. In general, to most of the end user, you should always configure your container as guaranteed class, i.e. requested == limited. You may need to have some justification before configuring it as bursted class.

5
  • Thank you. I agree I should have set the memory request and limit to the same value (1GB). I tried that but unfortunately I ended up with the same result. What is particularly concerning is that Kubernetes killed my container for using 1GB of memory but the metrics kubernetes gathered showed usage of only a few MB. And when I run the binary locally there is also no sign of a memory leak Apr 26, 2021 at 23:39
  • Did you try to check the kernel memory? You can check the kmem with the following command, cat /sys/fs/cgroup/memory/memory.kmem.usage_in_bytes. I have encountered unexpected kmem usage in GKE before as well.
    – Ryan Siu
    Apr 27, 2021 at 13:57
  • Good idea. I went in to check the kmem and regular memory usage. cat /sys/fs/cgroup/memory/memory.usage_in_bytes -> 83873792 and cat /sys/fs/cgroup/memory/memory.kmem.usage_in_bytes -> 2809856. I reloaded it multiple times and it was stable. Then GKE killed the container for OOM... Apr 28, 2021 at 1:56
  • A quick question: did the /sys/fs/cgroup/memory/memory.usage_in_bytes align with the GKE metrics?
    – Ryan Siu
    Apr 28, 2021 at 2:18
  • Yes reasonably well. It was ~80MB and the highest I saw in the GKE metrics was 56MB. The server also uses at most 80MB when I run it locally Apr 28, 2021 at 2:31

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