I want to do something like this:

foo=( )
foo[0]="bar"
foo[35]="baz"
for((i=0;i<${#foo[@]};i++))
do
    echo "$i: ${foo[$i]}"
done
# Output:
# 0: bar
# 1: 

Then i tried to loop through it using for in:

foo=( )
foo[0]="bar"
foo[35]="baz"
for i in ${foo[@]}
do
    echo "?: $i"
done
# Output:
# ?: bar
# ?: naz

but here I don't know the index value.

I know you could something like

foo=( )
foo[0]="bar"
foo[35]="baz"
declare -p foo
# Output:
# declare -a foo='([0]="bar" [35]="baz")'

but, can't you do it in another way?

up vote 204 down vote accepted

You would find the array keys with "${!foo[@]}" (reference), so:

for i in "${!foo[@]}"; do 
  printf "%s\t%s\n" "$i" "${foo[$i]}"
done
  • 4
    Important note, while iterable, a space separated list of words is not an array. Wrap it like so (a b c) to convert it to an array. – Breedly Aug 19 '16 at 18:59
  • 3
    The use of [@] and double quotes means it's not a "space separated list of words". You get the list of actual array keys, even if the individual keys contain whitespace. – glenn jackman Aug 21 '16 at 1:21
  • @glennjackman can you explain this more The use of [@] and double quotes means it's not a "space separated list of words" – Kasun Siyambalapitiya Dec 2 '16 at 10:27
  • "${foo[@]}" takes the (array) variable foo and expands it as an array, maintaining the identity of its elements, i.e., not splitting them on whitespace. If foo=(x 'y z'), then f "${foo[@]}" calls f with two arguments, x and 'y z'. Metadata queries like "${!foo[@]}" and "${#foo[@]}" similarly act on foo as an array. – BallpointBen Sep 5 at 1:23

you can always use iteration param:

        ITER=0
        for I in ${FOO[@]}
        do  
            echo ${I} ${ITER}
            ITER=$(expr $ITER + 1)
        done
  • 1
    ((ITER++)) in modern bash – David Tonhofer Jan 18 at 12:11
  • Why post-increment ? You only want the value incremented, hence ((++ITER)) is more directly a statement of what you want done .... – MikeW Feb 20 at 15:14
  • 1
    No, not "ALWAYS". A hash can have "holes", which means not all numbers are an index. In your example the ${ITER} is not always the index of ${I}. – Marco Sep 4 at 9:00
INDEX=0
for i in $list; do 
    echo ${INDEX}_$i
    let INDEX=${INDEX}+1
done
  • Your answer certainly is worth a little explanation. Kindly refer to stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer . Comments would help create searchable content. – J. Chomel Apr 5 '17 at 6:30
  • 3
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. Please also try not to crowd your code with explanatory comments, this reduces the readability of both the code and the explanations! – kayess Apr 5 '17 at 7:15
users=("kamal" "jamal" "rahim" "karim" "sadia")
index=()
t=-1

for i in ${users[@]}; do
  t=$(( t + 1 ))
  if [ $t -eq 0 ]; then
    for j in ${!users[@]}; do
      index[$j]=$j
    done
  fi
  echo "${index[$t]} is $i"
done

In bash 4, you can use associative arrays:

declare -A foo
foo[0]="bar"
foo[35]="baz"
for key in "${!foo[@]}"
do
    echo "key: $key, value: ${foo[$key]}"
done

# output
# $ key: 0, value bar.
# $ key: 35, value baz.

In bash 3, this works (also works in zsh):

map=( )
map+=("0:bar")
map+=("35:baz")

for keyvalue in "${map[@]}" ; do
    key=${keyvalue%%:*}
    value=${keyvalue#*:}
    echo "key: $key, value $value."
done

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