251

I want to do something like this:

foo=( )
foo[0]="bar"
foo[35]="baz"
for((i=0;i<${#foo[@]};i++))
do
    echo "$i: ${foo[$i]}"
done
# Output:
# 0: bar
# 1: 

Then i tried to loop through it using for in:

foo=( )
foo[0]="bar"
foo[35]="baz"
for i in ${foo[@]}
do
    echo "?: $i"
done
# Output:
# ?: bar
# ?: naz

but here I don't know the index value.

I know you could something like

foo=( )
foo[0]="bar"
foo[35]="baz"
declare -p foo
# Output:
# declare -a foo='([0]="bar" [35]="baz")'

but, can't you do it in another way?

6 Answers 6

427

You would find the array keys with "${!foo[@]}" (reference), so:

for i in "${!foo[@]}"; do 
  printf "%s\t%s\n" "$i" "${foo[$i]}"
done

Which means that indices will be in $i while the elements themselves have to be accessed via ${foo[$i]}

14
  • 7
    Important note, while iterable, a space separated list of words is not an array. Wrap it like so (a b c) to convert it to an array.
    – Breedly
    Aug 19, 2016 at 18:59
  • 5
    The use of [@] and double quotes means it's not a "space separated list of words". You get the list of actual array keys, even if the individual keys contain whitespace. Aug 21, 2016 at 1:21
  • @glennjackman can you explain this more The use of [@] and double quotes means it's not a "space separated list of words" Dec 2, 2016 at 10:27
  • 1
    "${foo[@]}" takes the (array) variable foo and expands it as an array, maintaining the identity of its elements, i.e., not splitting them on whitespace. If foo=(x 'y z'), then f "${foo[@]}" calls f with two arguments, x and 'y z'. Metadata queries like "${!foo[@]}" and "${#foo[@]}" similarly act on foo as an array. Sep 5, 2018 at 1:23
  • Right answer, but that reference is inscrutable. This answer helpfully just explains: ""${!foo[@]}" is the list of all the indexes set in the array".
    – pjhsea
    Feb 18, 2019 at 0:31
35

you can always use iteration param:

ITER=0
for I in ${FOO[@]}
do  
    echo ${I} ${ITER}
    ITER=$(expr $ITER + 1)
done
3
  • 12
    ((ITER++)) in modern bash Jan 18, 2018 at 12:11
  • Why post-increment ? You only want the value incremented, hence ((++ITER)) is more directly a statement of what you want done ....
    – MikeW
    Feb 20, 2018 at 15:14
  • 4
    No, not "ALWAYS". A hash can have "holes", which means not all numbers are an index. In your example the ${ITER} is not always the index of ${I}.
    – Marco
    Sep 4, 2018 at 9:00
19
INDEX=0
for i in $list; do 
    echo ${INDEX}_$i
    let INDEX=${INDEX}+1
done
1
  • I liked the conciseness of the answer and strategy. For anyone wondering this is bash and the strat is you just keep track of the array index on your own. Oct 11, 2020 at 0:25
9

Simple one line trick for dumping array

I've added one value with spaces:

foo=([12]="bar" [42]="foo bar baz" [35]="baz")

For a quick dump of arrays or associative arrays I use

This one line command:

paste <(printf "%s\n" "${!foo[@]}") <(printf "%s\n" "${foo[@]}")

Will render:

12  bar
35  baz
42  foo bar baz

Explained

  • printf "%s\n" "${!foo[@]}" will print all keys separated by a newline,
  • printf "%s\n" "${foo[@]}" will print all values separated by a newline,
  • paste <(cmd1) <(cmd2) will merge output of cmd1 and cmd2 line by line.

Tunning

This could be tunned by -d switch:

paste -d : <(printf "%s\n" "${!foo[@]}") <(printf "%s\n" "${foo[@]}")
12:bar
35:baz
42:foo bar baz

or even:

paste -d = <(printf "foo[%s]\n" "${!foo[@]}") <(printf "'%s'\n" "${foo[@]}")
foo[12]='bar'
foo[35]='baz'
foo[42]='foo bar baz'

Associative array will work same:

declare -A bar=([foo]=snoopy [bar]=nice [baz]=cool [foo bar]='Hello world!')
paste -d = <(printf "bar[%s]\n" "${!bar[@]}") <(printf '"%s"\n' "${bar[@]}")
bar[foo bar]="Hello world!"
bar[foo]="snoopy"
bar[bar]="nice"
bar[baz]="cool"

Issue with newlines or special chars

Unfortunely, there is at least one condition making this not work anymore: when variable do contain newline:

foo[17]=$'There is one\nnewline'

Command paste will merge line-by-line, so output will become wrong:

paste -d = <(printf "foo[%s]\n" "${!foo[@]}") <(printf "'%s'\n" "${foo[@]}")
foo[12]='bar'
foo[17]='There is one
foo[35]=newline'
foo[42]='baz'
='foo bar baz'

For this work, you could use %q instead of %s in second printf command (and whipe quoting):

paste -d = <(printf "foo[%s]\n" "${!foo[@]}") <(printf "%q\n" "${foo[@]}")

Will render perfect ( and reusable! ):

foo[12]=bar
foo[17]=$'There is one\nnewline'
foo[35]=baz
foo[42]=foo\ bar\ baz

From man bash:

          %q     causes  printf  to output the corresponding argument in a
                 format that can be reused as shell input.

Or by using a function:

dumpArray() {
    local -n _ary=$1
    local _idx
    local -i _idlen=0
    for _idx in "${!_ary[@]}"; do
        _idlen=" ${#_idx} >_idlen ? ${#_idx} : _idlen "
    done
    for _idx in "${!_ary[@]}"; do
        printf "%-*s: %s\n" "$_idlen" "$_idx" \
            "${_ary["$_idx"]//$'\n'/$'\n\e['${_idlen}C: }"
    done
}

Then now:

dumpArray foo
12: bar
17: There is one
  : newline
35: baz
42: foo bar baz

dumpArray bar
foo    : snoopy
bar    : nice
baz    : cool
foo bar: Hello world!

About UTF-8 format output

From UTF-8 string length, adding:

strU8DiffLen() { local chLen=${#1} LANG=C LC_ALL=C;return $((${#1}-chLen));}

Then

dumpArray() {
    local -n _ary=$1
    local _idx
    local -i _idlen=0
    for _idx in "${!_ary[@]}"; do
        _idlen=" ${#_idx} >_idlen ? ${#_idx} : _idlen "
    done
    for _idx in "${!_ary[@]}"; do
        strU8DiffLen "$_idx"
        printf "%-*s: %s\n" $(($?+$_idlen)) "$_idx" \
            "${_ary["$_idx"]//$'\n'/$'\n\e['${_idlen}C: }"
    done
}

Demo:

foo=([12]="bar" [42]="foo bar baz" [35]="baz")
declare -A bar=([foo]=snoopy [bar]=nice [baz]=cool [foo bar]='Hello world!')

foo[17]=$'There is one\nnewline'
LANG=fr.UTF-8 printf -v bar[déjà]  $'%(%a %d %b\n%Y\n%T)T' -1

dumpArray bar
déjà   : ven 24 déc
       : 2021
       : 08:36:05
foo    : snoopy
bar    : nice
baz    : cool
foo bar: Hello world!

dumpArray foo
12: bar
17: There is one
  : newline
35: baz
42: foo bar baz
1
  • My up vote for printf "%q\n" "${var[@]}" newline was my problem!
    – techno
    Feb 2, 2020 at 14:09
7

In bash 4, you can use associative arrays:

declare -A foo
foo[0]="bar"
foo[35]="baz"

# for Zsh, change this to: for key in "${(k)foo[@]}"
for key in "${!foo[@]}"
do
    echo "key: $key, value: ${foo[$key]}"
done

# output
# $ key: 0, value bar.
# $ key: 35, value baz.

In bash 3, this works (also works in zsh):

map=( )
map+=("0:bar")
map+=("35:baz")

for keyvalue in "${map[@]}" ; do
    key=${keyvalue%%:*}
    value=${keyvalue#*:}
    echo "key: $key, value $value."
done
2
  • trying the bash 3 version (in zsh), it echoes out the value for both key and value..
    – cannyboy
    Dec 30, 2021 at 20:49
  • 1
    I verified the second version works fine for me in Zsh 5.8, however, the first version is preferable if you're using Zsh. Replace for key in "${!foo[@]}" with for key in "${(k)foo[@]}" for Zsh.
    – mattmc3
    Dec 30, 2021 at 23:17
1
users=("kamal" "jamal" "rahim" "karim" "sadia")
index=()
t=-1

for i in ${users[@]}; do
  t=$(( t + 1 ))
  if [ $t -eq 0 ]; then
    for j in ${!users[@]}; do
      index[$j]=$j
    done
  fi
  echo "${index[$t]} is $i"
done
1
  • 2
    This is wrong! Inner loop is useless and could drive to wrong results! Feb 1, 2020 at 7:01

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