32

When I try to match for the string '3' in a case statement, it matches if the range goes up to '9', but not '10'.

I'm guessing it has something to do with the triple equals operator, but I don't know the exact reason why it can be in the range, but not matched.

Here is an IRB run documenting both cases that work (with '9'), and don't work (with '10'):

 case '3'
 when ('0'...'9')
     puts "number is valid"
 else
   puts "number is not valid"
 end

Output: number is valid

 case '3'
 when ('0'...'10')
     puts "number is valid"
 else
   puts "number is not valid"
 end

Output: number is not valid

The methods that I used as a reference for the expected results are
Enumerable#include?
Enumerable#member?
and seeing what is output when converted to an array is (Enumerable#to_a).

The result of the "case equality" (===) operator surprised me.

 puts ('0'...'10').include?('3')
 # => true
 puts ('0'...'10').member?('3')
 # => true
 puts ('0'...'10') === '3'
 # => false
 puts ('0'...'10').to_a
 # => ["0", "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9"]
3
  • 1
    TL;DR: Dictionary order is not the same as string-converted-to-a-number order. – Dave Newton Apr 23 at 17:32
  • 1
    If your range isn't that large, you can use when *'0'...'10' which turns your range into an argument list, i.e. when '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9'. – Stefan Apr 25 at 10:34
  • @Stefan I actually like this solution the best for what I was doing with it. It's succinct, and as long as the next guy understands what the splat operator does, it should be easier to read in the future. I asked the wrong question for this to be the answer, but it was the best solution to my problem so far. Thank you! – jockofcode May 3 at 21:15
41

Ranges use cover? for case equality. So it is comparing '3' >= '0' && '3' < '10' which results in false because '3' < '10' #=> false. Strings are compared based on character values.

For a better understanding you might want to see a string as an array of characters:

['3'] <=> ['1', '0'] #=> 1 (first operand is larger than the second)

To solve the issue convert your case input to an integer and use integer ranges:

case 3 # or variable.to_i
when 0...10
  puts 'number is valid'
else
  puts 'number is invalid'
end

This works because integers are not compared based on character code, but on actual value. 3 >= 0 && 3 < 10 results in true.

Alternatively you could explicitly tell when to use the member? (or include?) method, by not passing a range, but a method instead.

case '3'
when ('0'...'10').method(:member?)
  puts 'number is valid'
else
  puts 'number is invalid'
end
5
  • Thank you for providing solutions, as well as answering the question. The incoming data needs to be a string because of other when matches in the list, so including the .method(:member?) option is actually what solves my problem. I will need to look a little deeper as to why that works, but it is a doable workaround! – jockofcode Apr 23 at 17:42
  • 2
    @jockofcode The case equality of a method calls the method with the case argument/input. So passing range.method(:member?) to when resolves it using range.method(:member?) === input -> range.method(:member?).call(input) whereas providing just range will result in range === input -> range.cover?(input) – 3limin4t0r Apr 23 at 17:47
  • @jockofcode Method#===: "Invokes the method with obj as the parameter like call. This allows a method object to be the target of a when clause in a case statement." – engineersmnky Apr 23 at 18:28
  • 2
    @jockofcode In this specific scenario there is also the option to use '0'..'9' (two dots instead of three, see the Range documentation). But this only works if you expect a single digit. This is similar to the regex [0-9]. – 3limin4t0r Apr 23 at 20:15
  • @3limin4t0r: The implementation I'm using this in needs to be able to have an empty range, and to do that I needed the triple dot. It's for a text menu that has a variety of letter options, and also a number option to see search results up to 10. If the search returned no results, ('0'...[results.length,10].min.to_s) would not match "0" if there were no search results. – jockofcode Apr 23 at 21:40
17

=== says it's equivalent to cover?, and the documentation for the latter states that it's equivalent to

begin <= obj < end

So, in your case, we're getting

'0' <= '3' < '10'

And <= and < on strings compare using dictionary order, so the comparison is false.

On the other hand, we have to do a bit more digging to figure out what member? / include? actually do (the two are equivalent). If we look in the source code, we see that both invoke a function called range_include_internal which has a special case for string arguments that behaves differently than cover?. The latter calls rb_str_include_range_p which has even more special cases, including your digit case.

0

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