340

Say I have classes Foo and Bar set up like this:

class Foo
{
public:
    int x;

    virtual void printStuff()
    {
        std::cout << x << std::endl;
    }
};

class Bar : public Foo
{
public:
    int y;

    void printStuff()
    {
        // I would like to call Foo.printStuff() here...
        std::cout << y << std::endl;
    }
};

As annotated in the code, I'd like to be able to call the base class's function that I'm overriding. In Java there's the super.funcname() syntax. Is this possible in C++?

450
0

The C++ syntax is like this:

class Bar : public Foo {
  // ...

  void printStuff() {
    Foo::printStuff(); // calls base class' function
  }
};
| improve this answer | |
  • 11
    Is there any possible issues with doing this? Is it bad practice? – Robben_Ford_Fan_boy Feb 2 '11 at 15:01
  • 37
    @David: No, it's perfectly normal to do this, though it might depend on your actual class if it is actually useful. Only call the base class method if does something you want to happen ;). – sth Feb 2 '11 at 15:13
  • 20
    careful this is a code smell when your clients becomes REQUIRED to do it ! (called call super requirement, check it out here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_super) – v.oddou Mar 28 '14 at 3:49
  • 8
    @v.oddou: There is nothing wrong with calling the super class when it's useful. That page you linked is just about some specific potential problem involving inheritance. It even says itself that there is nothing wrong with calling the super class in general: "Note that it is the requirement of calling the parent that is the anti-pattern. There are many examples in real code where the method in the subclass may still want the superclass's functionality, usually where it is only augmenting the parent functionality." – sth Mar 28 '14 at 11:49
  • 26
    It may be obvious to most, but for completeness, remember to never do this in constructors and destructors. – TigerCoding Jul 6 '14 at 22:23
123
0

Yes,

class Bar : public Foo
{
    ...

    void printStuff()
    {
        Foo::printStuff();
    }
};

It is the same as super in Java, except it allows calling implementations from different bases when you have multiple inheritance.

class Foo {
public:
    virtual void foo() {
        ...
    }
};

class Baz {
public:
    virtual void foo() {
        ...
    }
};

class Bar : public Foo, public Baz {
public:
    virtual void foo() {
        // Choose one, or even call both if you need to.
        Foo::foo();
        Baz::foo();
    }
};
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    This is a better answer than the selected one. Thanks. – Mad Physicist Oct 17 '14 at 20:41
  • Multiple inheritance? Ooh yikes! – lamino Jul 23 '18 at 16:14
69
0

Sometimes you need to call the base class' implementation, when you aren't in the derived function...It still works:

struct Base
{
    virtual int Foo()
    {
        return -1;
    }
};

struct Derived : public Base
{
    virtual int Foo()
    {
        return -2;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Base *x = new Derived;

    ASSERT(-2 == x->Foo());

    //syntax is trippy but it works
    ASSERT(-1 == x->Base::Foo());

    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Note that you need both x to be of type Base* and to use the Base::Foo syntax for this to work – TTimo Mar 21 '18 at 19:59
27
0

Just in case you do this for a lot of functions in your class:

class Foo {
public:
  virtual void f1() {
    // ...
  }
  virtual void f2() {
    // ...
  }
  //...
};

class Bar : public Foo {
private:
  typedef Foo super;
public:
  void f1() {
    super::f1();
  }
};

This might save a bit of writing if you want to rename Foo.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Fun way to do it, but will not work with multiple inheritance. – Mad Physicist Oct 17 '14 at 20:43
  • 5
    And what if you have more than 1 base class? Anyway, it is silly and often futile to try to bend C++ to look like some other language. Just remember the base's name and call it by that. – underscore_d Apr 11 '16 at 13:18
6
0

If you want to call a function of base class from its derived class you can simply call inside the overridden function with mentioning base class name(like Foo::printStuff()).

code goes here

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Foo
{
public:
    int x;

    virtual void printStuff()
    {
         cout<<"Base Foo printStuff called"<<endl;
    }
};

class Bar : public Foo
{
public:
    int y;

    void printStuff()
    {
        cout<<"derived Bar printStuff called"<<endl;
        Foo::printStuff();/////also called the base class method
    }
};

int main()
{
    Bar *b=new Bar;
    b->printStuff();
}

Again you can determine at runtime which function to call using the object of that class(derived or base).But this requires your function at base class must be marked as virtual.

code below

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Foo
{
public:
    int x;

    virtual void printStuff()
    {
         cout<<"Base Foo printStuff called"<<endl;
    }
};

class Bar : public Foo
{
public:
    int y;

    void printStuff()
    {
        cout<<"derived Bar printStuff called"<<endl;
    }
};

int main()
{

    Foo *foo=new Foo;
    foo->printStuff();/////this call the base function
    foo=new Bar;
    foo->printStuff();
}
| improve this answer | |
0
0

check this...

#include <stdio.h>

class Base {
public:
   virtual void gogo(int a) { printf(" Base :: gogo (int) \n"); };    
   virtual void gogo1(int a) { printf(" Base :: gogo1 (int) \n"); };
   void gogo2(int a) { printf(" Base :: gogo2 (int) \n"); };    
   void gogo3(int a) { printf(" Base :: gogo3 (int) \n"); };
};

class Derived : protected Base {
public:
   virtual void gogo(int a) { printf(" Derived :: gogo (int) \n"); };
   void gogo1(int a) { printf(" Derived :: gogo1 (int) \n"); };
   virtual void gogo2(int a) { printf(" Derived :: gogo2 (int) \n"); };
   void gogo3(int a) { printf(" Derived :: gogo3 (int) \n"); };       
};

int main() {
   std::cout << "Derived" << std::endl;
   auto obj = new Derived ;
   obj->gogo(7);
   obj->gogo1(7);
   obj->gogo2(7);
   obj->gogo3(7);
   std::cout << "Base" << std::endl;
   auto base = (Base*)obj;
   base->gogo(7);
   base->gogo1(7);
   base->gogo2(7);
   base->gogo3(7);

   std::string s;
   std::cout << "press any key to exit" << std::endl;
   std::cin >> s;
   return 0;
}

output

Derived
 Derived :: gogo (int)
 Derived :: gogo1 (int)
 Derived :: gogo2 (int)
 Derived :: gogo3 (int)
Base
 Derived :: gogo (int)
 Derived :: gogo1 (int)
 Base :: gogo2 (int)
 Base :: gogo3 (int)
press any key to exit

the best way is using the base::function as say @sth

| improve this answer | |
  • As explained in this Question, this shouldn't work because of protected inheritance. To cast a base class pointer you have to use public inheritance. – Darkproduct Jun 3 at 9:06
  • Interesting. After reading this answer I thought with protected inheritance the fact that Derived is derived from Base would be only visible to the class itself and not visible to the outside too. – Darkproduct Jun 12 at 10:40
0
0

Yes you can call it. C++ syntax for calling parent class function in child class is

class child: public parent {
  // ...

  void methodName() {
    parent::methodName(); // calls Parent class' function
  }
};

Read more about function overriding.

| improve this answer | |

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