0

Helo, I'm a bit confused about the definition of an inner loop in the case of imperfectly nested loops. Consider this code

for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)
{
   for (j = 0; j <= i - 1; ++j)
        /*some statement*/
    p[i] = 1.0 / sqrt (x);
   for (j = i + 1; j < n; ++j)
   {
       x = a[i][j];
       for (k = 0; k <= i - 1; ++k)
          /*some statement*/
       a[j][i] = x * p[i];
   }
}

Here, we have two loops in the same nesting level. But, in the second loop which iterates over "j" starting from j+1, there is a again another nesting level. Considering the entire loop structure, which is the inner most loop in the code ?

  • 1
    Is this mayhap homework? I'm curious why you ask. – J. Steen Jul 18 '11 at 9:34
  • Sounds like a homework question? why do you need to know which is the inner most loop? I think you have answered your own question by refereing to nesting levels. – skyfoot Jul 18 '11 at 9:37
  • I'm stuck in my dissertation, where I need to model some loops .. and all this time I was seeing perfectly nested loops... – psteelk Jul 18 '11 at 9:39
0

Lol I don't know how to explain this so i'll give it my best shot I recommend using a debugger! it may help you so much you won't even know

for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)
{
   //Goes in here first.. i = 0..
   for (j = 0; j <= i - 1; ++j) {
        //Goes here second..
        //Goes inside here and gets stuck until j is greater then (i- 1) (right now i = 0)
        //So (i-1) = -1 so it does this only once.
        /*some statement*/
    p[i] = 1.0 / sqrt (x);
   }
   for (j = i + 1; j < n; ++j)
   {
      //Goes sixth here.. etc.. .. 
      //when this is done.. goes to loop for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)

      //Goes here third and gets stuck
      //j = i which is 0 + 1.. so, j == 1
      //keeps looping inside this loop until j is greater then n.. idk what is n..
      //Can stay here until it hits n.. which could be a while.
       x = a[i][j];
       for (k = 0; k <= i - 1; ++k) {
           //Goes in here fourth until k > (i-1).. i is still 0..
           //So (i-1) = -1 so it does this only once
          /*some statement*/
       a[j][i] = x * p[i];
      }
      //Goes here fifth.. which goes.... to this same loop!
   }
}
2

Both j loops are nested inside i equally, k is the inner most loop

0

I'd say that k is the inner-most loop, because if you count the number of loops required to reach it from the outside, it's three loops, and that's the most out of all four of the loops in your code.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.