9

In my work I come across a lot of gnarly sql, and I had the bright idea of writing a program to parse the sql and print it out neatly. I made most of it pretty quickly, but I ran into a problem that I don't know how to solve.

So let's pretend the sql is "select foo from bar where 1". My thought was that there is always a keyword followed by data for it, so all I have to do is parse a keyword, and then capture all gibberish before the next keyword and store that for later cleanup, if it is worthwhile. Here's the code:

import Text.Parsec
import Text.Parsec.Combinator
import Text.Parsec.Char
import Data.Text (strip)

newtype Statement = Statement [Atom]
data Atom = Branch String [Atom] | Leaf String deriving Show

trim str = reverse $ trim' (reverse $ trim' str)
  where
    trim' (' ':xs) = trim' xs
    trim' str = str

printStatement atoms = mapM_ printAtom atoms
printAtom atom = loop 0 atom 
  where
    loop depth (Leaf str) = putStrLn $ (replicate depth ' ') ++ str
    loop depth (Branch str atoms) = do 
      putStrLn $ (replicate depth ' ') ++ str
      mapM_ (loop (depth + 2)) atoms

keywords :: [String]
keywords = [
  "select",
  "update",
  "delete",
  "from",
  "where"]

keywordparser :: Parsec String u String
keywordparser = try ((choice $ map string keywords) <?> "keywordparser")

stuffparser :: Parsec String u String
stuffparser = manyTill anyChar (eof <|> (lookAhead keywordparser >> return ()))

statementparser = do
  key <- keywordparser
  stuff <- stuffparser
  return $ Branch key [Leaf (trim stuff)]
  <?> "statementparser"

tp = parse (many statementparser) ""

The key here is the stuffparser. That is the stuff in between the keywords that could be anything from column lists to where criteria. This function catches all characters leading up to a keyword. But it needs something else before it is finished. What if there is a subselect? "select id,(select product from products) from bar". Well in that case if it hits that keyword, it screws everything up, parses it wrong and screws up my indenting. Also where clauses can have parenthesis as well.

So I need to change that anyChar into another combinator that slurps up characters one at a time but also tries to look for parenthesis, and if it finds them, traverse and capture all that, but also if there are more parenthesis, do that until we have fully closed the parenthesis, then concatenate it all and return it. Here's what I've tried, but I can't quite get it to work.

stuffparser :: Parsec String u String
stuffparser = fmap concat $ manyTill somechars (eof <|> (lookAhead keywordparser >> return ()))
  where
    somechars = parens <|> fmap (\c -> [c]) anyChar
    parens= between (char '(') (char ')') somechars

This will error like so:

> tp "select asdf(qwerty) from foo where 1"
Left (line 1, column 14):
unexpected "w"
expecting ")"

But I can't think of any way to rewrite this so that it works. I've tried to use manyTill on the parenthesis part, but I end up having trouble getting it to typecheck when I have both string producing parens and single chars as alternatives. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to go about this?

  • 3
    Bite the bullet and write a full SQL parser. – augustss Jul 18 '11 at 12:30
  • 2
    Depending on the flavor and complexity of your SQL, you might be able to use this: language-sqlite. – hammar Jul 18 '11 at 16:20
  • A couple years ago when I was naive I tried to do that, and did you know that mysql has more bnf than there are atoms in the universe? I've looked at the yacc file, and it is too much to hope to pull apart. – David McHealy Jul 18 '11 at 16:40
  • 2
    Can you live with regular expressions to extract what you want then? It sounds like what you want to do is "island parsing" (a search should bring up a few references to the TXL and ASDF/ SGLR tools). While island parsing would seem superficially simple as you need a smaller grammar than a proper parser, trying to do it with Parsec is quite difficult. Particularly "start symbols" are a problem - you need to look at a lot of them to know when to jump out of the so called "water". – stephen tetley Jul 18 '11 at 18:01
  • I really want it to parse the sql. I worked on it some more and I got really close. There were some complications with many and eof that prevented outright success, but I'm not ready to give up yet. I still think this is possible. – David McHealy Jul 20 '11 at 4:40
5

Yeah, between might not work for what you're looking for. Of course, for your use case, I'd follow hammar's suggestion and grab an off-the-shelf SQL parser. (personal opinion: or, try not to use SQL unless you really have to; the idea to use strings for database queries was imho a historical mistake).

Note: I add an operator called <++> which will concatenate the results of two parsers, whether they are strings or characters. (code at bottom.)

First, for the task of parsing parenthesis: the top level will parse some stuff between the relevant characters, which is exactly what the code says,

parseParen = char '(' <++> inner <++> char ')'

Then, the inner function should parse anything else: non-parens, possibly including another set of parenthesis, and non-paren junk that follows.

parseParen = char '(' <++> inner <++> char ')' where
    inner = many (noneOf "()") <++> option "" (parseParen <++> inner)

I'll make the assumption that for the rest of the solution, what you want to do is analgous to splitting things up by top-level SQL keywords. (i.e. ignoring those in parenthesis). Namely, we'll have a parser that will behave like so,

Main> parseTest parseSqlToplevel "select asdf(select m( 2) fr(o)m w where n) from b where delete 4"
[(Select," asdf(select m( 2) fr(o)m w where n) "),(From," b "),(Where," "),(Delete," 4")]

Suppose we have a parseKw parser that will get the likes of select, etc. After we consume a keyword, we need to read until the next [top-level] keyword. The last trick to my solution is using the lookAhead combinator to determine whether the next word is a keyword, and put it back if so. If it's not, then we consume a parenthesis or other character, and then recurse on the rest.

-- consume spaces, then eat a word or parenthesis
parseOther = many space <++>
    (("" <$ lookAhead (try parseKw)) <|> -- if there's a keyword, put it back!
     option "" ((parseParen <|> many1 (noneOf "() \t")) <++> parseOther))

My entire solution is as follows

-- overloaded operator to concatenate string results from parsers
class CharOrStr a where toStr :: a -> String
instance CharOrStr Char where toStr x = [x]
instance CharOrStr String where toStr = id
infixl 4 <++>
f <++> g = (\x y -> toStr x ++ toStr y) <$> f <*> g

data Keyword = Select | Update | Delete | From | Where deriving (Eq, Show)

parseKw =
    (Select <$ string "select") <|>
    (Update <$ string "update") <|>
    (Delete <$ string "delete") <|>
    (From <$ string "from") <|>
    (Where <$ string "where") <?>
    "keyword (select, update, delete, from, where)"

-- consume spaces, then eat a word or parenthesis
parseOther = many space <++>
    (("" <$ lookAhead (try parseKw)) <|> -- if there's a keyword, put it back!
     option "" ((parseParen <|> many1 (noneOf "() \t")) <++> parseOther))

parseSqlToplevel = many ((,) <$> parseKw <*> (space <++> parseOther)) <* eof

parseParen = char '(' <++> inner <++> char ')' where
    inner = many (noneOf "()") <++> option "" (parseParen <++> inner)

edit - version with quote support

you can do the same thing as with the parens to support quotes,

import Control.Applicative hiding (many, (<|>))
import Text.Parsec
import Text.Parsec.Combinator

-- overloaded operator to concatenate string results from parsers
class CharOrStr a where toStr :: a -> String
instance CharOrStr Char where toStr x = [x]
instance CharOrStr String where toStr = id
infixl 4 <++>
f <++> g = (\x y -> toStr x ++ toStr y) <$> f <*> g

data Keyword = Select | Update | Delete | From | Where deriving (Eq, Show)

parseKw =
    (Select <$ string "select") <|>
    (Update <$ string "update") <|>
    (Delete <$ string "delete") <|>
    (From <$ string "from") <|>
    (Where <$ string "where") <?>
    "keyword (select, update, delete, from, where)"

-- consume spaces, then eat a word or parenthesis
parseOther = many space <++>
    (("" <$ lookAhead (try parseKw)) <|> -- if there's a keyword, put it back!
     option "" ((parseParen <|> parseQuote <|> many1 (noneOf "'() \t")) <++> parseOther))

parseSqlToplevel = many ((,) <$> parseKw <*> (space <++> parseOther)) <* eof

parseQuote = char '\'' <++> inner <++> char '\'' where
    inner = many (noneOf "'\\") <++>
        option "" (char '\\' <++> anyChar <++> inner)

parseParen = char '(' <++> inner <++> char ')' where
    inner = many (noneOf "'()") <++>
        (parseQuote <++> inner <|> option "" (parseParen <++> inner))

I tried it with parseTest parseSqlToplevel "select ('a(sdf'())b". cheers

  • Running your code, it works. Unfortunately I don't understand applicative style very well so I can't judge it. Nonetheless I will be dissecting this to figure out how it works within the next few days. Thank you! – David McHealy Jul 20 '11 at 5:11
  • 1
    @onmach Sure, the applicative style I'm using is very basic, though. [For monads] the <*> operator applies a monadic-valued function to a monadic-valued argument; it's the same as mf <*> mx = do { f <- mf; x <- mx; return f x }. – gatoatigrado Jul 20 '11 at 19:27
  • There is one problem: select 'im a string with a frowny :(',id from table fails. But yours has something mine didn't so I'll muddle through it until it works for me. Thanks. – David McHealy Jul 21 '11 at 6:09
  • @onmach see edit – gatoatigrado Jul 21 '11 at 7:21

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