5

I try to compile an Ada 95 program with an Ada 2012 compiler. However there are problems with instantiation of the generic package Garbage_Collector. The subtype A_Term is not accepted in the package instantiation:

prolog.adb:27:15: designated type of actual does not match that of formal "Link"
prolog.adb:27:15: instantiation abandoned

I have tried to change A_Term to type A_Term is access A_Node;. Then the package will instantiate, but the rest of the code breaks. Has something changed since Ada 95 and how can I make it work in Ada 2012?

procedure Prolog is

   generic
      type Item is limited private;
      type Link is access Item;
   package Garbage_Collector is
      procedure Get (L : in out Link) is null;
   end Garbage_Collector;

   type Node_Tag is (A, B);

   type Node (Tag : Node_Tag);
   type Term is access Node;

   type Node (Tag : Node_Tag) is
      record
         case Tag is
            when A => null;
            when B => null;
         end case;
      end record;

   subtype A_Node is Node (A);
   subtype A_Term is Term (A);
   package Gc_A is new Garbage_Collector
     (Item => A_Node,
      Link => A_Term);

   T : Term;
begin
   Gc_A.Get (T);
end Prolog;

The code is from a Prolog module from Stanford University. The project on GitHub

2
  • 3
    Something could have been changed along with the changes described in this Ada 2005 rationale, though I can't put my finger on it. – flyx May 3 at 17:14
  • 2
    A bug with access subtypes could easily have been introduced when they changed the rules for generic formal access-to-subprogram types, discussed in this AI – egilhh May 3 at 19:09
5

I can't say what exactly causes your error. It could well be that this is a compiler bug. To fix this in a minimal invasive way, I suggest to make the access relation invisible to the generic unit:

procedure Prolog is

   generic
      type Item is limited private;
      type Link is private;
      with function Deref (L : Link) return Item is <>;
   package Garbage_Collector is
      procedure Get (L : in out Link) is null;
   end Garbage_Collector;

   type Node_Tag is (A, B);

   type Node (Tag : Node_Tag);
   type Term is access Node;

   type Node (Tag : Node_Tag) is
      record
         case Tag is
            when A => null;
            when B => null;
         end case;
      end record;

   subtype A_Node is Node (A);
   subtype A_Term is Term (A);
   
   function Deref (L : A_Term) return A_Node is (L.all);
   
   package Gc_A is new Garbage_Collector
     (Item  => A_Node,
      Link  => A_Term);

   T : Term;
begin
   Gc_A.Get (T);
end Prolog;

Now the compiler does not complain because the formal type Link is not an access type anymore and has no relation to Item. By giving the function Deref, you are still able to dereference an object of type Link. You will need an additional function if you need to assign to it.

3

In your code sample above, you declare types Node and Term:

type Node (Tag : Node_Tag);
type Term is access Node;

You then attempt to declare two subtypes:

subtype A_Node is Node (A);
subtype A_Term is Term (A);

The declaration of subtype A_Node makes sense, since Node is a discriminant type. The declaration of subtype A_Term does not make sense. Type Term is access Node, which is different from type Node. Try changing the declaration of subtype A_Term to:

subtype A_Term is access A_Node;
3
  • The declaration of A_Term certainly makes sense, the RM calls it an access subtype. Check 3.10, including the example near the bottom of the page – egilhh May 3 at 17:43
  • The access type has no determinant. Only the accessed type has a determinant. Furthermore, an access to the base type will function as an access to the subtype of that base type. – Jim Rogers May 3 at 18:38
  • It's a discriminant constraint, and is perfectly legal Ada, and I already linked to the RM... The question is not about the legality of the subtype (which is proven legal), it is about the generic formals. – egilhh May 3 at 18:51

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