102

I'm using Spring 3.0.5 and am using @Autowire annotation for my class members as much as possible. One of the beans that I need to autowire requires arguments to its constructor. I've looked through the Spring docs, but cannot seem to find any reference to how to annotate constructor arguments.

In XML, I can use as part of the bean definition. Is there a similar mechanism for @Autowire annotation?

Ex:

@Component
public class MyConstructorClass{

  String var;
  public MyConstructorClass( String constrArg ){
    this.var = var;
  }
...
}


@Service
public class MyBeanService{
  @Autowired
  MyConstructorClass myConstructorClass;

  ....
}

In this example, how do I specify the value of "constrArg" in MyBeanService with the @Autowire annotation? Is there any way to do this?

Thanks,

Eric

  • 1
    Maybe I wasn't clear, or perhaps I am misunderstanding, but I am not looking to autowire constrArg; I'm looking to autowire MyConstructorClass, but the constructor requires a String. If I was using XML configuration, my bean defn would be: – Eric B. Jul 19 '11 at 2:22
  • If I was using XML configuration, my bean defn would be something like: <bean id="myBeanService" class="MyBeanService"> <property name="myConstructorClass"> <bean class="MyConstructorClass"> <constructor-arg value="MyStringHere" /> </bean> </property> </bean> Is there a way to translate that into annotations? – Eric B. Jul 19 '11 at 2:30
56

You need the @Value annotation.

A common use case is to assign default field values using "#{systemProperties.myProp}" style expressions.

public class SimpleMovieLister {

  private MovieFinder movieFinder;
  private String defaultLocale;

  @Autowired
  public void configure(MovieFinder movieFinder, 
                        @Value("#{ systemProperties['user.region'] }"} String defaultLocale) {
      this.movieFinder = movieFinder;
      this.defaultLocale = defaultLocale;
  }

  // ...
}

See: Expression Language > Annotation Configuration


To be more clear: in your scenario, you'd wire two classes, MybeanService and MyConstructorClass, something like this:

@Component
public class MyBeanService implements BeanService{
    @Autowired
    public MybeanService(MyConstructorClass foo){
        // do something with foo
    }
}

@Component
public class MyConstructorClass{
    public MyConstructorClass(@Value("#{some expression here}") String value){
         // do something with value
    }
}

Update: if you need several different instances of MyConstructorClass with different values, you should use Qualifier annotations

  • 1
    Thanks for the tip, but I don't understand how that relates to setting the constructor arg for the injected bean. From what I can tell from the spring docs, it is good for setting default values, but doesn't specify how to pass a constructor arg. – Eric B. Jul 19 '11 at 2:35
  • 2
    @EricB. @Value is like @Autowired for string arguments. – Bozho Jul 19 '11 at 5:47
  • @Eric B (awesome username, btw :-)), I've added some sample code for illustration – Sean Patrick Floyd Jul 19 '11 at 7:21
  • Thanks for the tip. The catch here is the requirement for me to have access to modify the MyConstructorClass code. Unfortunately, that is not always the case; I don't necessarily have the ability to modify the code. Additionally, in my example, I'm using a String as the argument, but there are cases where the contructor requires other beans as arguments. – Eric B. Jul 19 '11 at 14:59
  • @Eric well then you either need XML or Java based configuration – Sean Patrick Floyd Jul 19 '11 at 18:13
11

Well, from time to time I run into the same question. As far as I know, one cannot do that when one wants to add dynamic parameters to the constructor. However, the factory pattern may help.

public interface MyBean {
    // here be my fancy stuff
}

public interface MyBeanFactory {
    public MyBean getMyBean(/* bean parameters */);
}

@Component
public class MyBeanFactoryImpl implements MyBeanFactory {
    @Autowired
    WhateverIWantToInject somethingInjected;

    public MyBean getMyBean(/* params */) {
        return new MyBeanImpl(/* params */);
    }

    private class MyBeanImpl implements MyBean {
        public MyBeanImpl(/* params */) {
            // let's do whatever one has to
        }
    }
}

@Component
public class MyConsumerClass {
    @Autowired
    private MyBeanFactory beanFactory;

    public void myMethod() {
        // here one has to prepare the parameters
        MyBean bean = beanFactory.getMyBean(/* params */);
    }
}

Now, MyBean is not a spring bean per se, but it is close enough. Dependency Injection works, although I inject the factory and not the bean itself - one has to inject a new factory on top of his own new MyBean implementation if one wants to replace it.

Further, MyBean has access to other beans - because it may have access to the factory's autowired stuff.

And one might apparently want to add some logic to the getMyBean function, which is extra effort I allow, but unfortunately I have no better solution. Since the problem usually is that the dynamic parameters come from an external source, like a database, or user interaction, therefore I must instantiate that bean only in mid-run, only when that info is readily available, so the Factory should be quite adequate.

9

In this example, how do I specify the value of "constrArg" in MyBeanService with the @Autowire annotation? Is there any way to do this?

No, not in the way that you mean. The bean representing MyConstructorClass must be configurable without requiring any of its client beans, so MyBeanService doesn't get a say in how MyConstructorClass is configured.

This isn't an autowiring problem, the problem here is how does Spring instantiate MyConstructorClass, given that MyConstructorClass is a @Component (and you're using component-scanning, and therefore not specifying a MyConstructorClass explicitly in your config).

As @Sean said, one answer here is to use @Value on the constructor parameter, so that Spring will fetch the constructor value from a system property or properties file. The alternative is for MyBeanService to directly instantiate MyConstructorClass, but if you do that, then MyConstructorClass is no longer a Spring bean.

  • Can @Value be set to a fully qualified bean? And them via Autowiring it'll be found? – Kevin Meredith Aug 14 '14 at 23:01
5

You can also configure your component like this :

package mypackage;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
   @Configuration
   public class MyConstructorClassConfig {


   @Bean
   public MyConstructorClass myConstructorClass(){
      return new myConstructorClass("foobar");
   }
  }
}

With the Bean annotation, you are telling Spring to register the returned bean in the BeanFactory.

So you can autowire it as you wish.

1

You need to use @Autowired and @Value. Refer this post for more information on this topic.

  • 1
    The answer is there thought it's short. The answer in essence is to you '@Autowired' and '@Value'. I could have added it as a comment but it's a long time back and I'm not sure I had comment privileges... – Fahim Farook May 14 '16 at 12:57
0

An alternative would be instead of passing the parameters to the constructor you might have them as getter and setters and then in a @PostConstruct initialize the values as you want. In this case Spring will create the bean using the default constructor. An example is below

@Component
public class MyConstructorClass{

  String var;

  public void setVar(String var){
     this.var = var;
  }

  public void getVar(){
    return var;
  }

  @PostConstruct
  public void init(){
     setVar("var");
  }
...
}


@Service
public class MyBeanService{
  //field autowiring
  @Autowired
  MyConstructorClass myConstructorClass;

  ....
}
0

Most answers are fairly old, so it might have not been possible back then, but there actually is a solution that satisfies all the possible use-cases.

So right know the answers are:

  • Not providing a real Spring component (the factory design)
  • or does not fit every situation (using @Value you have to have the value in a configuration file somewhere)

The solution to solve those issues is to create the object manually using the ApplicationContext:

@Component
public class MyConstructorClass
{
    String var;

    public MyConstructorClass() {}
    public MyConstructorClass(String constrArg) {
        this.var = var;
    }
}

@Service
public class MyBeanService implements ApplicationContextAware
{
    private static ApplicationContext applicationContext;

    MyConstructorClass myConstructorClass;

    public MyBeanService()
    {
        // Creating the object manually
        MyConstructorClass myObject = new MyConstructorClass("hello world");
        // Initializing the object as a Spring component
        AutowireCapableBeanFactory factory = applicationContext.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory();
        factory.autowireBean(myObject);
        factory.initializeBean(myObject, myObject.getClass().getSimpleName());
    }

    @Override
    public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext context) throws BeansException {
        applicationContext = context;
    }
}

This is a cool solution because:

  • It gives you access to all the Spring functionalities on your object (@Autowired obviously, but also @Async for example),
  • You can use any source for your constructor arguments (configuration file, computed value, hard-coded value, ...),
  • It only requires you to add a few lines of code without having to change anything.
  • It can also be used to dynamically create a unknown number of instances of a Spring-managed class (I'm using it to create multiple asynchronous executors on the fly for example)

The only thing to keep in mind is that you have to have a constructor that takes no arguments (and that can be empty) in the class you want to instantiate (or an @Autowired constructor if you need it).

  • whats the point of MyConstructorClass myConstructorClass;? You never use it? Did you to use myConstructorClass instead of myObject? – Dan Aug 16 '17 at 10:28
  • @Dan I honestly don't remember as it was a while back but yeah it might just be a mistake that I left or a variable that I was using before but ended up not needing. – AntoineB Aug 16 '17 at 15:32
0

Another alternative, if you already have an instance of the object created and you want to add it as an @autowired dependency to initialize all the internal @autowired variables, could be the following:

@Autowired 
private AutowireCapableBeanFactory autowireCapableBeanFactory;

public void doStuff() {
   YourObject obj = new YourObject("Value X", "etc");
   autowireCapableBeanFactory.autowireBean(obj);
}

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