1

Correct me if I'm wrong but of what I know and my understanding of race conditions and TOCTOU (Time of check and time of use) bug, checking if a file exists this way:

if [ -f /path/to/file ]; then 
    #File exists do some operations on it
fi

Creates a race condition and TOCTOU bug. So is there any other way of checking if a file or directory exists without creating a race condition, or maybe trying to open the file and handle errors if it doesn't exists.

I know it may be not so critical in most scripts to use the previous method but for me it's best to practice to avoid these kind of conditions.
Thanks for any help.

3

2 Answers 2

6

To avoid race condition, you could rename the file as a first step lock condition. On many filesystems, it's an "atomic" operation that could not be done concurrently (one inode write).

This way, if the renaming is a success, you can be sure that the file exists and that none of your other processes have taken it with its original name.

Example, renaming the file with current process PID :

mv /path/to/file path/to/file.$$
if [ $? = 0 ] ; then
  # Success, we can work on path/to/file.$$, and we're then the only one to do so from 
  # our processes point of view.
  cat path/to/file.$$ # doing something with the file
  # At the end, we can rename/move the file as 'processed'
  mv path/to/file.$$ processed_path/to/file
fi

This way, you can also have a recovery process for files with a PID number as extension.

EDIT: As @Thomas argues for it, here is a basic implementation of this solution in as a bash script, process. It is excepted to be in a directory tree like :

[ `process` current directory ]
|-->[input] input directory where the script look for '*.txt' files to process
|-->[input_path_etl] input directory where the script will place processed file for ETL

The script require the /proc filesystem to do simple process check. For vertical readability, the SC2181 has not been applied.

The script processes files with ./process and can do recovery on crash with ./process -r from its current path. It's just an example to illustrate how to use mv lock. The processing of the .txt files here is a first step to fictonnaly load data from the files into a database and a second step to produces fictionnal files for an ETL processor.

#!/bin/bash
# process factory paths, should read from a config file, LDAP source, wathever...
process_input_path="input"
process_input_etl_path="input_path_etl"
# Example of an imaginary process that load stdin into a db
load_into_db() {
  return 0;
}
# Example of an imaginary process that clean the data in the db for recovery
# Parameters : { filename }
# Returns: 0 successful recover, 1 otherwise
# filename: file path and name which require cleaning in db, mandatory
# stderr: potential cleaning erros
clean_db() {
  if [ $# != 1 ] ; then
    echo "ERROR: clean_db, wrong parameters" 2>&1
    return 1;
  fi
  return 0;
}
# Example of an imaginary process that load a file into a db
# Parameters: { filename }
# returns: 0 if successfull, 1 if failed
# filename: file's path and name of the file to process, mandatory
# stderr: potential processing errors
process_first_step() {
  if [ $# != 1 ] ; then
    echo "ERROR: process_first_step wrong parameters" 2>&1
    return 1;
  fi
  # first example step, load things from the file into a db
  cat "$1.$$_1" | load_into_db
  if [ $? = 0 ] ; then 
    # rename first the file to means step 1 was succesfully done and 
    # we go for the second
    mv "$1.$$_1" "$1.$$_2"
    if [ $? = 0 ] ; then 
      # success, the file is ready for step 2
      return 0;
    fi
  fi
  # If we're here, something went wrong in step 1, exiting with error
  return 1;
}
# Example of an imaginary process that put a file into the input path of an ETL
# Parameters: { filename }
# returns: 0 if successfull, 1 if failed
# filename: file's path and name of the file to process, mandatory
# stderr: potential processing errors
process_second_step() {
  if [ $# != 1 ] ; then
    echo "ERROR: process_second_step wrong parameters" 2>&1
    return 1;
  fi
  # the file is ready for step 2, we create the appropriate input
  # for the ETL with some sed transfomration beforehand
  cat "$1.$$_2" | sed 's/line/lInE/g' > "$1.$$_2.etl"
  if [ $? = 0 ] ; then
    # Success, the file is ready for the ETL factory process,
    # we move it in with an atomic mv to make it visible from 
    # the ETL factory process
    mv "$1.$$_2.etl" "${process_input_etl_path}/"
    if [ $? = 0 ] ; then
      # Successful, step 2 is done
      return 0;
    fi
  fi
  # If we're here, something went wrong in step 2, exiting with error
  return 1;
}
# Example of an imaginary file processor that conducts all the
# required step on the provided file
# Parameters : { filename }
# Returns : 0 if successful, 1 otherwise
# filename : file's path and name of the file to process, mandatory
# stderr: potential processing errors
process_file() {
  if [ $# != 1 ] ; then
    echo "ERROR: process_file, wrong parameters" 2>&1
    return 1;
  fi
  # Lock the file for processing step one
  mv "$1" "$1.$$_1" 
  if [ $? = 0 ] ; then
    # ok we have the file for us
    # first example step, load things from the file into a db
    process_first_step "$1"
    if [ $? = 0 ] ; then
      # first step is successful, so continue the process
      # next example step, add the loaded lines with transformations into the input path of antoher process factory (like an ETL)
      process_second_step "$1"
      if [ $? = 0 ] ; then
        # Second step is susccesful, we can now rename the file  with
        # a suffix meaning it was fully processed, a filename that would
        # not be visible for the factory process
        mv "$1.$$_2" "$1_processed"
        if [ $? != 0 ] ; then
          # if this failed, we have to return an error,
          # the current file name would be $1.$$_2, not visible
          # from the process factory and the error message will mean
          # that the file was fully processed but can't be renamed
          # at the end, so no recovering is required
          echo "ERROR: process_file, $1 can't be renamed as fully processed." 2>&1
          return 1;
        fi
        # if we're here, the file was fully processed and rename accordingly,
        # we return a success status
        return 0;
      fi
    fi
  fi
  # If we're here, something went wrong in the process, we exit with an error
  # the actual filename will be $1.$$_1 or $1.$$_2 depending of where it was
  # in the processing chain, it will not be visible from the main 
  # process factory and the rcovery process can then process it accordingly
  return 1;
}
# Example of an imaginary process recovery for orphan files due to a crash, 
# power outage, unexpected reboot, CTRL^C, etc.
# Returns: 0 for success, 1 if error(s)
# stdout: recovery operations infos if any
# stderr: potential error(s)
process_recovery() {
  if [ $# != 0 ] ; then
    echo "ERROR: process_recovery, wrong parameters." 2>&1
    return 1;
  fi
  # local variables
  local process_FILE=""
  local process_PID=""
  local process_STEP=""
  local process_CMD=""
  # flag for the file that means :
  #     0 : do not recover
  #     1 : recover
  #     2 : can't recover
  #     3 : recover successful, rename to put the file back in the process
  #     4 : recover successful, rename it as fully processed
  local recover_status=0
  # flag to check if the recover process is succesful, 
  #     0: success
  #     1: error(s)
  local recovery_status=0
  # We can only have one recovery process at a time, check for the corresponding lock, we use an atomic mkdir for that 
  mkdir "${process_input_path}/recover" &>/dev/null
  if [ $? != 0 ] ; then
    # if it fails, it means there is probably already a running recover
    echo "ERROR: process_recovery, a recovery seems to be still in progress." 2>&1
    echo "                         if there is no more running recovery (crash)," 2>&1
    echo "                        disarm manually the lock by removing the recover folder." 2>&1
    echo "                        Check also that the input folder is writable for script." 2>&1
    return 1;
  fi
  # We first have to check every files in the input path that match 
  # a *.txt.<PID>_<step> pattern
  find "${process_input_path}/" -name '*.txt.[0-9]*_[12]' | ( while read -r file_to_check || exit ${recovery_status};  do 
    # By default, do not recover
    recover_status=0
    # Get the PID and check if there is a running corresponding process
    process_PID="$(echo "${file_to_check}" | sed 's/^.*\.txt\.\([^_]*\)_[0-9]*$/\1/')"
    if [[ $? != 0 || "${process_PID}" = "${file_to_check}" ]] ; then
      # Something went wrong, we output an error on stderr and set the flag
      echo "ERROR: process_recovery, failed to parse pid from file name ${file_to_check}" 2>&1
      recovery_status=1;
      recover_status=2;
    else 
      # We check the shell process through /proc and check it is our
      process_CMD="$(cat "/proc/${process_PID}/comm" 2>/dev/null)"
      if [[ $? = 0 && "$(echo "${process_CMD}" | grep process.sh)" != "" ]] ; then
        # There is a process.sh with the same PID, no recover needed
        echo "File ${file_to_check} is processed by PID ${process_PID}..."
      else
        # There is no corresponding process, but it could have finished during
        # our operations, so we check if the file is still here
        if [ -e "${file_to_check}" ] ; then
          # The file is still here, so we need to recover
          echo "XX${process_CMD}"
          recover_status=1;
        fi
      fi
    fi
    if [ "${recover_status}" = "1" ] ; then
      # The file should be recovered, signal it
      echo "Recovering file ${file_to_check}..."
      # Get the original file name
      process_FILE="$(echo "${file_to_check}" | sed 's/^\(.*\.txt\)\.[^_]*_[0-9]*$/\1/')"
      if [[ $? != 0 || "${process_FILE}" = "${file_to_check}" ]] ; then
        # Something went wrong, we output an error on stderr and set the flag
        echo "ERROR: process_recovery, failed to parse original name from file name ${file_to_check}" 2>&1
        recovery_status=1;
        recover_status=2;
      else
        # We need to know at which step it was 
        process_STEP="$(echo "${file_to_check}" | sed 's/^.*\.txt\.[^_]*_\([0-9]*\)$/\1/')"
        if [[ $? != 0 || "${process_STEP}" = "${file_to_check}" ]] ; then
          # Something went wrong, we output an error on stderr and set the flag
          echo "ERROR: process_recovery, failed to parse step from file name ${file_to_check}" 2>&1
          recovery_status=1;
          recover_status=2;
        fi
      fi
      # Still ok to recover ?
      if [ "${recover_status}" = "1" ] ; then
        # check the step
        case "${process_STEP}" in
            "1")
              # Do database cleaning for the file, we will revert and rename the file 
              # so it will be processed next by the factory process
              clean_db "${file_to_check}"
              if [ $? != 0 ]; then
                # The cleaning process has failed, signal it
                echo "ERROR: process_recovery, failed to clean the db for ${file_to_check}" 2>&1
                recovery_status=1;
                recover_status=2;
              else
                # Cleaning was successful, rename the file so it will be 
                # visible at new from the process factory
                recover_status=3;
              fi
              ;;
            "2")
              # If the file is still here, check if it is not in the input path of the ETL 
              # or if the ETL is/has already processing/processed it
              if [[ -e "${process_input_etl_path}/${process_FILE}.etl" || -e "${process_input_etl_path}/${process_FILE}.etl_processed" ]] ; then
                # The file as fully completed step 2 then and should be marked as processed
                recover_status=4;
              else 
                # If the file has not reach the ETL input path, we just have to launch step 2 for the file
                # If there is .etl local file, we aren't sure it was completed before crash, so a redo of step will simply overwrite it,
                # as it is a local file in the current path, it has never been seen by the ETL 
                # We rename it for processing with the recovery PID
                echo "Recovering ${file_to_check} on step 2 as ${process_FILE}.$$_2..."
                mv "${file_to_check}" "${process_FILE}.$$_2"
                if [ $? != 0 ]; then
                  # The renaming failed, signal it. The file is still here, so a future recovery can handle it , nothing more to do 
                  echo "ERROR: process_recovery, failed to rename file ${file_to_check} for step 2" 2>&1
                  recovery_status=1;
                  recover_status=2;
                else
                  # File is ready for step 2
                  process_second_step "${process_FILE}"
                  if [ $? != 0 ]; then
                    # The step 2 redo failed, signal it. The file is still here, so a future recovery can handle it , nothing more to do 
                    echo "ERROR: process_recovery, failed to redo step 2 for ${file_to_check}" 2>&1
                    recovery_status=1;
                    recover_status=2;
                  else
                    # The file as fully completed step 2 then and should be marked as processed
                    recover_status=4;
                    # Need so that the processed part deals with the new filename
                    file_to_check="${process_FILE}.$$_2"
                  fi
                fi
              fi
              ;;
            *)
               # Abnormal situation, unknow step, signal it
                echo "ERROR: process_recovery, unknown step for ${file_to_check}" 2>&1
                recovery_status=1;
                recover_status=2;
                ;;
        esac;
        # If the recovery operations were successful, we can now rename the file accordingly
        case "${recover_status}" in
          "3")
            # Rename it 'back' so the file will be processed by the process factory next
            mv "${file_to_check}" "${process_FILE}"
            if [ $? != 0 ]; then
              # The renaming failed, signal it. The file is still here, so a future recovery can handle it , nothing more to do 
              echo "ERROR: process_recovery, failed to put back the file ${file_to_check}" 2>&1
              recovery_status=1;
              recover_status=2;
            else
              echo "Recovering ${file_to_check}...done, reverted."
            fi
            ;;
          "4")
            # Rename as already fully processed 
            mv "${file_to_check}" "${process_FILE}_processed"
            if [ $? != 0 ]; then
              # The renaming failed, signal it. The file is still here, so a future recovery can handle it , nothing more to do 
              echo "ERROR: process_recovery, failed to rename the fully processed file ${file_to_check}" 2>&1
              recovery_status=1;
              recover_status=2;
            else
              echo "Recovering ${file_to_check}...done, processed."
            fi
            ;;
        esac;
      fi
    fi
  done )
  if [ $? != 0 ] ; then
    # the recovery processing meets errors, we have to exit with error
    recovery_status=1;
  fi
  # Finished, we can remove the recovery lock, there'll b nop race condition if a second recovery process start now
  # We can only have one recovery process at a time, check for the corresponding lock, we use an atomic mkdir for that 
  rmdir "${process_input_path}/recover" &>/dev/null
  if [ $? != 0 ] ; then
    echo "ERROR: process_recovery, can't remove the recovery lock, you'l have to manually remove it." 2>&1
    recovery_status=1;
  fi
  # Return status
  return ${recovery_status};
}
# Example of an imaginary file processing factory
# this factory will look for all files matching '*.txt' in its input path
# Parameteres: [ -r ]
# Returns : 0 if all matching files in the input path were processed, 
#           1 otherwise
# -r : Instead of processing files, launch the recovery process, optional
# stdout : processing log
# stderr : potential processing errors
process_files() {
  if [ $# -gt 1 ]; then
    echo "ERROR: process_files, wrong parameters" 2>&1
    return 1;
  fi
  if [[ $# = 1 && "$1" = "-r" ]] ; then
    # launch the recovery process and exit its exit status
    process_recovery
    return $?
  fi
  if [ $# != 0 ] ; then
    echo "ERROR: process_files, unknown parametrs : $*" 2>&1
    return 1;
  fi
  # Parameter(s) have been processed, we are now looking for files to process
  local process_status=0;
  find "${process_input_path}/" -name '*.txt' | ( while read -r file_to_process || exit ${process_status}; do
    echo "Processing ${file_to_process}..."
    process_file "${file_to_process}"
    if [ $? != 0 ] ; then
      # Something went wrong, signal it on stderr
      echo "Processing ${file_to_process} failed, the file may has been locked by antoher process or may be in the wrong format." 2>&1
      # We set the flag for signaling trouble but we continue to process 
      # the following files
      process_status=1; 
    else
      echo "Processing ${file_to_process}...done."
    fi
  done ) 
  if [ $? != 0 ] ; then
    # the factory processing meets errors, we have to exit with error
    return 1;
  fi
  # All matching files were correctly processed or there was no
  # matching files to process, we return a success
  return 0;
}
# The main entry point
# check that we have paths before anything harmful happend..
if [[ -z "${process_input_path}" || -z "${process_input_etl_path}" ]] ; then
  echo "ERROR: $0, configuration missing..." 2>&1
  exit 1;
fi
# Before processing any file, we check for /proc
if [ ! -e "/proc/$$" ] ; then
  echo "ERROR: $0, /proc is required..." 2>&1
  exit 2;
fi
# We force a common identifier for the processing script, process.sh, so recovery can easily check for running process
echo "process.sh" > "/proc/$$/comm"
if [ $? != 0 ] ; then
  echo "ERROR: $0, can't set /proc/$$/comm..." 2>&1
  exit 3;
fi
process_files "$@"
18
  • This is highly risky because the script could be killed for one reason or another before the final mv puts the file back in place. In addition, something inside the body of the if could prevent the final mv command, for instance, a process that fills up the disk space. Thirdly, the mv could fail because the current user does not have the necessary access rights. Finally, the mv commmands are not without side-effects: for instance, they change the "last changed" information of the file (ctime).
    – Thomas
    May 5, 2021 at 10:08
  • @Thomas If the script is killed while running, you have at least a way to know that it was processing the file. You can even detect that orphan file.PID due to the fact that the PID not longer exists in the process list. For the final mv, you can also check if it is successful or not and act accordingly. And there should be no disk space trouble as it is renaming of the file, not a move between partitions. Lastly, you could restore the original "last modified" with touch if needed.
    – Zilog80
    May 5, 2021 at 10:12
  • 1
    A trap could be used to restore the state.
    – stark
    May 5, 2021 at 12:18
  • I never claimed that these problems could not be fixed - but your code does not include those fixes. Regarding "you have at least a way to know that [the script] was processing the file" -> this seems like a weak argument, I'd rather have my files back. You're right, though, about the disk space (non-)issue.
    – Thomas
    May 5, 2021 at 13:34
  • @Thomas I don't see that as a weak argument. Ability to detect abnormal situations and knowing what was the file status regarding the process in case of crash seems very useful to me. Adding the recovery code to the answer seems also out of scope regarding the question, and a bit overkill, the fact that it could be done seems enough here, no ? Adding code to restore the initial state of the file seems overkill too as it may be not needed, and should be in an another question, no ?
    – Zilog80
    May 5, 2021 at 13:40
2

The way your code is written, the if checks whether a certain file exists, and if so executes the body of the if.

Now, there's really only a race condition if the body of the if relies on the fact that the file exists (as established by the condition). This would typically be the case when the body performs some operation on the file, such as, e.g.:

  • Opening the file for reading / appending / writing (as in: only write to the file if it exists)
  • Moving or copying the file
  • Querying some properties (size, last modified, etc.) of the file

Many of these operations, however, can be executed without first checking whether the file exists. Instead, you could simply perform the operation and react on a "file not found" error.

It becomes more tricky, however, if you want to execute more than one such operation and exclude the possibility that the file in question gets changed concurrently. This cannot be done by a simple if, because the semantics are slightly different:

  • With an if like written in your question, you're checking: Does the file exists at this point in time? (the point in time being the execution of the condition)
  • What you'd need to successfully run the whole body without race conditions is a check such as Does the file exist (and remains unchanged) for the whole duration of the body?

You see that the former cannot guarantee the latter. You'd need some kind of locking mechanism instead.

2
  • The truth I thought about it but if I perform these operations on the file when the file doesn't exist using for example cat It outputs cat's error message in addition to mine which is annoying.
    – yankh18
    May 5, 2021 at 9:42
  • You can redirect undesired error output of a command to /dev/null to suppress it: cat /does/not/exist.txt 2>/dev/null || echo "this is MY file-not-found msg"
    – Thomas
    May 5, 2021 at 9:44

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