2

I have a comma separated integers and I want to store them in std::vector<int>. Currently I am manually doing it. Is there any built-in function which did the above functionality?

Edit:

I was in hurry and forget to put full details Actually i have string (to be exact Unicode string) containing CSvs e.g. "1,2,3,4,5" Now i want to store them in std::vector<int> so in above case my vector would have five elements pushed into it. Currently i am doing this by manual but its slow as well as there is lot of mess with that code

  • 1
    Put some code to demonstrate your exact problem' – iammilind Jul 19 '11 at 4:50
  • 1
    are you storing integers as well as commas in std::vector? – Donotalo Jul 19 '11 at 4:50
  • What's the source of the comma-separated list? A stream? A string? What's the approach you're currently using? – Sven Jul 19 '11 at 5:13
  • @iammilind See Information in the "Edit" Section of my question – Jame Jul 19 '11 at 5:17
  • @ Donotalo See Information in the "Edit" Section of my question – Jame Jul 19 '11 at 5:18
3

You can do this using purely in STL for simplicity (easy to reading, no complex libs needed), which will be fast for coding, but not the fastest in terms of execution speed (though you can probably tweak it a little, like pre-reserving space in the vector:

std::vector<int> GetValues(std::wstring s, wchar_t delim)
{
    std::vector<int> v;
    std::wstring i;
    std::wstringstream ss(s);
    while(std::getline(ss,i,delim))
    {
        std::wstringstream c(i);
        int x;
        c >> x;
        v.push_back(x);
    }

    return v;
}

(no forwarding(&&) or atoi to keep the code portable).

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  • 1
    This works if the data is clean. What about 1 ghghg, 2 fjfjfjf, 3 djdjdjd, 4 Your code will read this without complaining. You need to test after reading the value x that there is nothing else (except space) on the line. – Martin York Jul 19 '11 at 7:53
4

It's probably not be the most efficient way, but here's a way to do it using the TR1 regex functionality (I also use C++0x lambda syntax in this sample, but obviously it could also be done without that):

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <regex>
#include <iterator>
#include <cstdlib>

std::vector<int> GetList(const std::wstring &input)
{
    std::vector<int> result;
    std::wsregex_iterator::regex_type rex(L"(\\d+)(,|$)");
    std::wsregex_iterator it(input.begin(), input.end(), rex);

    std::transform(it, std::wsregex_iterator(), std::back_inserter(result),
        [] (const std::wsregex_iterator::value_type &m)
            { return std::wcstol(m[1].str().c_str(), nullptr, 10); });

    return result;
}
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  • I completely forgot the regex library. +1 for proving me wrong ;). – J.N. Jul 19 '11 at 5:49
  • That's just lovely. I really need to explore boost, I am still stuck in STL since forever. – Sharath Jul 19 '11 at 6:23
  • @Sharath K Shetty: this isn't using boost, regular expressions were added to the STL. :) – Sven Jul 19 '11 at 6:29
  • Oops, that's right. Regex is now part of C++0x. I am outdated :-( – Sharath Jul 19 '11 at 6:33
2

Sadly, the STL doesn't allow you to split a string on a separator. You can use boost to do it though: (requires a recent C++ compiler such as MSVC 2010 or GCC 4.5)

#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>

#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    string input = "1,2,3,4";
    vector<string> strs;
    boost::split(strs, input, boost::is_any_of(","));

    vector<int> result;
    transform(
        strs.begin(), strs.end(), back_inserter(result),
        [](const string& s) -> int { return boost::lexical_cast<int>(s); }
    );

    for (auto i = result.begin(); i != result.end(); ++i)
        cout << *i << endl;
}
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  • 1
    If you're going to use Boost for this, you might as well use Boost Tokenizer with and Escaped List Separator: boost.org/doc/libs/1_47_0/libs/tokenizer/… – Ferruccio Jul 19 '11 at 15:04
  • 2
    This may not be the best boost usage. You are infact iterating over the input twice. Once to split the input into a vector of strings then a second time to convert the strings into numbers. If you use boost::tokenizer you can achieve the same affect in one pass. – Martin York Jul 19 '11 at 15:25
  • Thanks for the advice, very relevant indeed. I had not used boost:tokenizer before, I'll have a closer look. – J.N. Jul 19 '11 at 23:20
2

The quick and dirty option is to use the C string library strtok() function, and atoi():

void Split(char * string, std::vector<int>& intVec)
{
    char * pNext = strtok(string, ",");
    while (pNext != NULL)
    {
        intVec.push_back(atoi(pNext));
        pNext = strtok(NULL, ",");
    }
}

Insert your own input data validation as required.

See:

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstring/strtok/
http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/atoi/

As well as the wide string versions:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2c8d19sb%28v=vs.71%29.aspx
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa273408%28v=vs.60%29.aspx

EDIT: Note that strtok() will modify your original string, so pass a copy if need be.

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  • 1
    If the goal is runtime speed, then I guess this is faster. Be careful, strtok only works in a single threaded environment. Since the code will probably run during initialization, I guess that's fine though. – J.N. Jul 19 '11 at 6:56
  • Saem problem as @Necrolis above: The input 1 jjfjfjf, 2 fjfjfj, 3 gjgjgjg, 4 is parsed as if the garbage is not there. Rather than using atoi() you could use boost::lexical_cast<int>() this will convert and validate that the input is only a number. – Martin York Jul 19 '11 at 15:26
  • strtok is one of those 'evil' functions whose results may be different than what you expect. "a,b,c" loads three elements. "a,,b" only loads two elements. Keep that in mind when using the function. – EvilTeach Jan 4 '17 at 17:08
1

Try this:
It will read any type (that can be read with >>) separated by any char (that you choose).
Note: After the object is read there should can only be space between the object and the separator. Thus for things like ObjectSepReader<std::string, ','> it will read a word list separated by ','.

This makes it simple to use our standard algorithms:

#include <vector>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
    std::stringstream   data("1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9");
    std::vector<int>    vdata;

    // Read the data from a stream
    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<ObjectSepReader<int, ','> >(data),
              std::istream_iterator<ObjectSepReader<int, ','> >(),
              std::back_inserter(vdata)
             );

    // Copy data to output for testing
    std::copy(vdata.begin(), vdata.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout," "));
}

The secret class to make it work.

template<typename T,char S>
struct ObjectSepReader
{
    T value;
    operator T const&() const {return value;}
};
template<typename T,char S>
std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& stream, ObjectSepReader<T,S>& data)
{
    char        terminator;
    std::string line;

    std::getline(stream, line, S);
    std::stringstream  linestream(line + ':');

    if (!(linestream >> data.value >> terminator) || (linestream.tellg() != line.size()+1) || (terminator != ':'))
    {   stream.setstate(std::ios::badbit);
    }

    return stream;
}
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0

Personally I'd make a structure and have the vector contain instances of the struct. Like so:

struct ExampleStruct
{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
};
vector<ExampleStruct> structVec;
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0

How about this?

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <functional>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

struct PickIntFunc
{
    PickIntFunc(std::vector<int>& vecInt): _vecInt(vecInt),_pBegin(0){}

    char operator () (const char& aChar)
    {
        if(aChar == ',' || aChar == 0)
        {
            _vecInt.push_back(atoi(std::string(_pBegin,&aChar).c_str()));
            _pBegin = 0;
        }
        else
        {
            if(_pBegin == 0)
            {
                _pBegin = &aChar;
            }
        }
        return aChar;
    }

    const char* _pBegin;
    std::vector<int>& _vecInt;
};


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::vector<int> vecInt;

    char intStr[] = "1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20";

    std::for_each(intStr,intStr+sizeof(intStr),PickIntFunc(vecInt));

    // Now test it
    std::for_each(vecInt.begin(),vecInt.end(), [] (int i) { std::cout << i << std::endl;});

    return 0;
}
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