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I am trying use object oriented programming style to write the code for a Tkinter app. I want to use a class method to place labels(or other widgets) to the GUI. The code I wrote is adding a character which I don't expect to the GUI. How can I write the initial add_label method so that it does not add the unwanted character. Below is my code and a screenshot. I am new to OOP, so i might be missing something.

from tkinter import *
class App:
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.widgets(root)
        self.add_label(root)

    def widgets(self, app):
        self.title = Label(app, text= 'LABEL UP').pack()
        self.btn = Button(app, text = 'BUTTON').pack()
    def add_label(self, text):
        Label(text= text).pack()

root = Tk()
App(root)
App.add_label(root, 'LABEL_1')
App.add_label(root,'LABEL_2')
root.mainloop()

enter image description here I am new to OOP and stil trying to figure out how i can benefit from code reuse in this case. My app has several widgets and functions

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  • Can you explain giving an example of what you want and what you got? May 7, 2021 at 8:57
  • @CoolCloud addes the screenshot
    – mapperx
    May 7, 2021 at 8:59
  • 2
    Remove self.add_label(root). May 7, 2021 at 9:03

1 Answer 1

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What do you expect self.add_label(root) to do? According to your method definition, it takes text as argument, so when you say self.add_label(root), you are passing root as text. And what is root? It is '.', so remove it and it'll be gone.

Though a proper way to do this will be to pass a parent argument to the method and use that while widget creation:

And the important part is, your instantiating the class wrong. Keep a reference to it, rather than creating a lot of instances.

from tkinter import *

class App:
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.widgets(root)

    def widgets(self, app):
        self.title = Label(app, text= 'LABEL UP').pack()
        self.btn = Button(app, text = 'BUTTON').pack()
    
    def add_label(self, parent, text):
        Label(parent,text= text).pack()

root = Tk()

app = App(root)
app.add_label(root, 'LABEL_1')
app.add_label(root,'LABEL_2')

root.mainloop()

Try not to get confused with both the mistakes.

How would I write this class? I don't know the true purpose of this, but I think you can follow something like this:

from tkinter import *

class App:
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.parent = parent
        
        self.title = Label(self.parent, text='LABEL UP')
        self.title.pack()

        self.entry = Entry(self.parent)
        self.entry.pack()

        self.btn = Button(self.parent, text='BUTTON')
        # Compliance with PEP8
        self.btn.config(command=lambda: self.add_label(self.entry.get())) 
        self.btn.pack()

    def add_label(self, text):
        Label(self.parent, text=text).pack()

    def start(self):
        self.parent.mainloop()

root = Tk()

app = App(root)
app.start()
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  • I would be interested to see any other option as you stated (...Though a proper way to do this will be to pass a parent argument to the method and use that while widget creation...)
    – mapperx
    May 7, 2021 at 9:14
  • 1
    @mapperx More options? The code I included is the best way current code can be modified to(IMO). Or you can surely just restructure your code. You would not need to make a method to create labels. It is just one line of code, do that manually. Functions on different widgets that are reusable can be made onto a method. And almost all variables are None in your code. May 7, 2021 at 9:16
  • 1
    @mapperx Check the updated answer to see an alternative structuring. May 7, 2021 at 9:23
  • Just for clarity, what does the 'parent' stand for in your implementation and why do you choose to add the start method. I get the basics of the code. I am really trying to understand OOP better. Gone through some materials already but challenging for me to implement it into solving real life problems.
    – mapperx
    May 7, 2021 at 9:44
  • 1
    Clear and understood.
    – mapperx
    May 7, 2021 at 9:52

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